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Edward Montague

(1480s - 1557) [ODNB]

JP Northamptonshire 1523; king's sergeant 1537

Chief justuce of the King's Bench 1539; chief justice of the Common Pleas (1545 - 53)

Edward Montague was a signatory to a letter from the council to Edmund Bonner, instructing that he cease to allow private masses in St Paul's. 1563, pp. 692-93; 1570, p. 1493; 1576, p. 1265; 1583, p. 1302.

Edward Montague was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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Edward North

(1496? - 1564) [ODNB; Bindoff]

1st Baron North of Kirtling (1554 - 64); brother of Joan Wilkinson

Edward North was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

Edward North was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

North was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

North was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

North was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 812

 
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Francis Talbot

(1500 - 1560) [ODNB]

5th earl of Shrewsbury (1538 - 60)

b. Sheffield Castle; privy councillor (1549 - death; lord president of the council in the north (1549 - death)

Francis Talbot was a signatory to a letter from the council to Edmund Bonner, instructing that he cease to allow private masses in St Paul's. 1563, pp. 692-93; 1570, p. 1493; 1576, p. 1265; 1583, p. 1302.

He was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

 
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Henry Fitzalan

(1512 - 1580) [ODNB]

Earl of Arundel (1544 - 80); deputy of Calais (1540 - 44); lord chamberlain, privy councillor

Henry Fitzalan was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

He was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

 
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Master Hampton

Of Reading.

Master Hampton was engaged by enemies of Julins Palmer to befriend and then betray him. 1570, p. 2120, 1576, p. 1842 [recte 1831], 1583, p. 1937.

 
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Nicholas Wotton

(c. 1497 - 1567) [ODNB; Fasti]

Ecclesiastical lawyer, diplomat; DCnCL; DD

Archdeacon of Gloucester (1540 - ?); secretary of state 1549; dean of Canterbury (1541 - 67) and of York (1544 - 67); ambassador to France (1553 - 57)

Nicholas Wotton was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1212; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Wotton was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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Richard Rich

(1496/7 - 1567) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Solicitor-general (1533 - 36); JP Essex, Hertfordshire (1528 - death); privy councillor (1540 - 58); MP Colchester 1529, MP Essex 1536, 1539, 1542, 1545; speaker of the House of Commons 1536

Lord chancellor (1547 - 51); 1st Baron Rich 1547

Richard Rich and Edmund Bonner attempted to persuade Anne Askew to change her views after her condemnation. Rich then sent her to the Tower. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

Rich and Sir John Baker went to Anne Askew in the Tower and tried to get her to incriminate others. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

Sir Anthony Knyvet had his jailer rack Anne Askew. When Knyvet refused to have the racking continued, Richard Rich and Thomas Wriothesley racked her themselves. She refused to give any information, but was released by Knyvet. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1239.

Richard Rich was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to Edmund Bonner, instructing that he cease to allow private masses in St Paul's. 1563, pp. 692-93; 1570, p. 1493; 1576, p. 1265; 1583, p. 1302.

Lord Rich spoke to the assembled justices of the peace, urging them to work assiduously to keep order in the realm and especially to further the king's religious reforms. 1570, p. 1493; 1576, p. 1265; 1583, p. 1302.

Lord Rich was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 821-22.

Lord Rich was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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The king sent Richard Lord Rich, Sir Anthony Wingfield and Sir William Petre to his sister, Lady Mary, to ensure she and her household complied with the new laws on religion. 1576, pp. 1296-97; 1583, pp. 1338-39.

 
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Sir Edward Wotton

(1489?-1551) [ODNB]

Administrator; JP Kent 1524 onwards; sheriff of Kent 1529, 1535

Treasurer of Calais (1540 - death)

Edward Wotton was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

Edward Wotton was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

 
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Sir John Ayleyff

Sheriff of London (1548 - 49) [PRO List of Sheriffs]

The lord mayor, the sheriffs and the council of London agreed to support the opponents of Edward Seymour and published a proclamation against him. 1570, pp. 1546-47; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

 
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Sir John Baker

(c. 1489 - 1558) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Judge, administrator; MP London 1529, 1536; MP Guildford, 1542; MP Lancaster 1545; MP Huntingdonshire 1547; MP Bramber 1553; MP Kent 1554

Attorney-general (1536 - 40); chancellor of the exchequer (1540 - 58); speaker of the House (1545, 1547)

Sir John Baker was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1212; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Baker was one of those appointed commissioner for Calais in 1540. 1563, p. 664; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1226.

After the execution of Adam Damplip in Calais, John Butler and Daniel the curate were taken to England and imprisoned in the Marshalsea. They stayed there nine months and were accused of having retained Damplip by Sir John Gage, Sir John Baker and Sir Thomas Arundel. [NB: Sir John Gage is named as Sir George Gage in the 1576 and 1583 editions.] 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

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Before Henry VIII gave his oration to parliament in 1545, the speaker of the House of Commons, Sir John Baker, gave an eloquent oration to the king. 1570, p. 1412; 1576, p. 1203; 1583, p. 1233.

Richard Rich and Sir John Baker went to Anne Askew in the Tower and tried to get her to incriminate others. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

Sir John Baker was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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Sir John Baker was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 826.

 
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Sir John Gage

(1479 - 1556) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Military administrator, courtier; constable of the Tower (1540 - 56); lord chamberlain (1533 - 56); JP Sussex (1514 - 56); JP Surrey (1528 - 56); comptroller of Calais (1524 - 26); MP Sussex (1529, 1539, 1542, 1545)

John Gage was one of those appointed commissioner for Calais in 1540. 1563, p. 664; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1226.

Gage beat the shackled Calais prisoners as they boarded the ship for England. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

After the execution of Adam Damplip in Calais, John Butler and Daniel the curate were taken to England and imprisoned in the Marshalsea. They stayed there nine months and were accused of having retained Damplip by Sir John Gage, Sir John Baker and Sir Thomas Arundel. [NB: Sir John Gage is named as Sir George Gage in the 1576 and 1583 editions.] 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

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Sir John Gage was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

 
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Sir Ralph Sadler

(1507 - 87) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Diplomat, administrator; Cromwell's secretary; MP Hindon 1536 ; MP Middlesex 1539; MP Hertfordshire 1542, 1553, 1559, 1563, 1571, 1572, 1584, 1586; MP Preston 1545; JP Hertfordshire, Gloucestershire

Privy councillor (1540 - 53, 1566 - 87); principal secretary (1540 - 43); king's secretary to Henry VIII; treasurer (1544 - 53)

After the Act of Supremacy, Henry VIII attempted to improve relations with other monarchs by sending ambassadors. Sir Ralph Sadler was sent to James V, king of the Scots. Upon gaining an audience with the king, he delivered an oration. 1570, p. 1218; 1576, pp. 1043-44; 1583, pp. 1070-71.

When Thomas Cromwell was imprisoned in the Tower, Sir Ralph Sadler remained loyal to him and took a letter from him to the king. 1570, p. 1361; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1190.

Stephen Gardiner preached a sermon contrary to the king's injunctions. He was arrested and taken to the Tower by Sir Anthony Wingfield and Sir Ralph Sadler; Sadler and William Hunnings were instructed to seal off doors to his house. He was transferred to the Fleet. 1563, pp. 728, 760; 1570, pp. 1521, 1529; 1576, pp. 1297, 1304; 1583, pp. 1340, 1353-54.

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Ralph Sadler was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 806

Ralph Sadler was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

 
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Sir Richard Southwell

(1502/3 - 1564) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Administrator; JP Norfolk/Suffolk (1531 - 54); sheriff Norfolk and Suffolk (1534); MP Norfolk (1539, 1542, 1553, 1554); privy councillor (1547, 1553 - 58)

Sir Richard Southwell was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

 
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Sir Thomas Cheyne

(c. 1485 - 1558) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Administrator, diplomat; sheriff of Kent (1515 - 16), JP Kent (1526 - 58); warden of the Cinque ports (1536 - 58); treasurer of the household (1539 - 58); MP Kent (1542 - 54, 1556 - 58)

Thomas Cheyne was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

Thomas Cheyne was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

 
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Sir William Herbert

(1506/7 - 1570) [ODNB]

1st earl of Pembroke (1551 - 70); soldier and magnate; Katherine Parr's brother-in-law; MP Wiltshire 1547

Sir William Herbert was appointed to assist Sir John Russell in the west at the time of the Western Rising. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1307.

When John Russell replied to the lord protector's request for troops to combat the nobles conspiring against him, Russell said that he and William Herbert both hoped for a reconciliation between the two sides. 1570, p. 1546; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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After Stephen Gardiner had been in the Tower for nearly a year, Sir William Paulet and Sir William Petre, the earl of Warwick and Sir William Herbert delivered the king's letters to him. 1563, pp. 761-62, 766; 1570, pp. 1529-30, 1533; 1576, pp. 1304, 1306; 1583, pp. 1354, 1356.

When Sir William Herbert and Sir William Petre went to Stephen Gardiner in the Tower with new articles, they took with them a canon and a civil lawyer: Nicholas Ridley and Richard Goodrich. 1563, p. 768; 1570, p. 1534; 1576, p. 1307; 1583, p. 1357.

Herbert was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 825-26.

 
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Sir William Petre

(1505/6 - 1572) [ODNB]

Administrator; BCL Oxford 1526, BCanL 1526, DCL 1533

Privy councillor 1544; principal secretary to Edward VI

William Petre was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

William Petre was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

Thomas Cranmer, archbishop of Canterbury, Nicholas Ridley, bishop of Rochester, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May, dean of St Paul's, were commissioned to examine Edmund Bonner. 1563, p. 697; 1570, p. 1504; 1576, p. 1275; 1583, p. 1312.

Bonner was summoned to appear before the commissioners. He behaved haughtily, ridiculing his accusers and the commissioners, and spoke in favour of the mass. He appeared first on 10 September 1549 before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre and William May. Sir Thomas Smith was absent. 1563, pp. 698-99; 1570, pp. 1504-06; 1576, pp. 1275-77; 1583, pp. 1312-14.

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Bonner appeared for the second time on 13 September before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May and was further examined. 1563, pp. 699-704; 1570, pp. 1506-08; 1576, pp. 1277-79; 1583, pp. 1314-17.

The king sent Richard Lord Rich, Sir Anthony Wingfield and Sir William Petre to his sister, Lady Mary, to ensure she and her household complied with the new laws on religion. 1576, pp. 1296-97; 1583, pp. 1338-39.

Edward Seymour sent William Petre with a message to the lords opposing him, who kept Petre with them awaiting a reply. 1570, p. 1546; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

William Petre was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

Edward Seymour, John Russell, John Dudley and Sir William Petre visited Stephen Gardiner in the Tower at various times to attempt to get him to accept the king's reforms. 1563, pp. 766; 1570, p. 1532; 1576, p. 1306; 1583, p. 1356.

After Gardiner had been in the Tower for nearly a year, Sir William Paulet and Sir William Petre visited and urged him to admit his fault. Paulet, Petre, the earl of Warwick and Sir William Herbert delivered the king's letters to him. 1563, pp. 761-62; 1570, pp. 1529-30; 1576, p. 1304; 1583, p. 1354.

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When Sir William Herbert and Sir William Petre went to Stephen Gardiner in the Tower with new articles, they took with them a canon and a civil lawyer: Nicholas Ridley and Richard Goodrich. 1563, p. 768; 1570, p. 1534; 1576, p. 1307; 1583, p. 1357.

After Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

 
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Thomas Wriothesley

(1505 - 1550) [ODNB]

Administrator; Cromwell's private secretary; engraver of the Tower mint 1536; MP Hampshire (1539, 1542); JP Hampshire (1538 - 46)

Principal secretary to the king (1540 - 44); clerk of the crown and king's attorney (1542 - 50); privy councillor (1540 - 47, 1548 - 50); lord chancellor (1544 - 47)

Baron Wriothesley 1544; 1st earl of Southampton (1547 - 50)

Stephen Gardiner had Wriothesley and other privy councillors on his side when he reported Windsor heretics to the king. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, p. 1214.

Wriothesley took part in the examination of John Marbeck. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

Katherine Parr read and studied the scriptures and discussed them with her chaplains. The king was aware of this and approved, so she began to debate matters of religion with him. When the king became more ill-tempered because of his sore leg, her enemies, especially Stephen Gardiner and Thomas Wriothesley, took the opportunity to turn the king against her. 1570, pp. 1422-23; 1576, pp. 1212-13; 1583, pp. 1242-43.

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When Wriothesley with 40 of the king's guard came to arrest the queen and her ladies-in-waiting, he found them walking happily in the garden with the king. The king sent him away. 1570, p. 1425; 1576, p. 1214; 1583, p. 1244.

Wriothesley was one of the questioners at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

Sir Anthony Knyvet had his jailer rack Anne Askew. When Knyvet refused to have the racking continued, Richard Rich and Thomas Wriothesley racked her themselves. She refused to give any information, but was released by Knyvet. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1239.

The Sunday before Anne Askew was executed, Thomas Wriothesley had George Blage sent to Newgate and then to the Guild Hall, where he was condemned to be burnt. 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1245.

Wriothesley was present at Anne Askew's burning. He brought her letters offering the king's pardon if she recanted, but she refused. 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, p. 1240.

Thomas Wriothesley was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

 
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William Locke

(1480 - 1550) [ODNB]

Mercer, merchant adventurer; created sheriff of London March 1549

The lord mayor, the sheriffs and the council of London agreed to support the opponents of Edward Seymour and published a proclamation against him. 1570, pp. 1546-47; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

 
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William Parr

(1513 - 1571) [ODNB]

Brother of Katherine; courtier; earl of Essex (1543 - 53); privy councillor (1545 - 48)

Marquess of Northampton (1547 - 53, 1559 - 71)

William Parr, earl of Essex, was one of the questioners at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

Northampton was sent to quell the rebellion in Norfolk in 1549, with instructions to keep his troops out of Norwich. He disobeyed the instructions, and the rebels took Norwich. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

Northampton was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

Parr was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 812

 
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William Paulet

(1474/5? - 1572) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Lord St John 1539; earl of Wiltshire 1550; marquess of Winchester 1551

Sheriff of Hampshire 1511, 1518, 1522; JP Hampshire (1514 - death), Wiltshire (1523 - death), Somerset (1531 - death), all counties (1547 - death); lord great master (1545 - 50); privy councillor 1542; lord president of the council (1545 - 50); lord treasurer (1550 - death)

William Paulet sent a letter to Princess Mary via Lord Hussey, her chamberlain, informing her she was to move her household and omitting her title. 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1395.

Paulet was one of those appointed commissioner for Calais in 1540. 1563, p. 664; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1226.

William Paulet was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

William Paulet was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to Edmund Bonner, instructing that he cease to allow private masses in St Paul's. 1563, pp. 692-93; 1570, p. 1493; 1576, p. 1265; 1583, p. 1302.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

Paulet was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

After Gardiner had been in the Tower for nearly a year, Sir William Paulet and Sir William Petre visited and urged him to admit his fault. Paulet, Petre, the earl of Warwick and Sir William Herbert delivered the king's letters to him. 1563, pp. 761-62; 1570, pp. 1529-30; 1576, p. 1304; 1583, p. 1354.

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Paulet was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 813

 
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Hampton Court Palace

East Molesey, Surrey

OS grid ref: TQ 157 685

 
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Windsor
NGR: SU 967 768

A borough, market town and parish having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Ripplesmere, county of Berkshire. 20 mile east by north from Reading, 22.5 miles west by south from London. The castle, built by Henry I, occupies more than 12 acres of ground, comprising upper, lower and middle wards. A principal royal residence in Tudor times. The living [of the town] is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire, Diocese of Salisbury.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1392 [1368]

King Edw.6. The trouble of the Duke of Somerset. The Lord Protectours letter to the Councell.

MarginaliaAnno 1552.the eight of the sayde moneth, first lamenteth the heauie dissention fallen betwene the Nobilitye and hym, which he taketh for suche a plague, as a greater could not be sent of almighty God vpon this Realme, being the next way (saith he) to make of vs conquerors, slaues, & like to induce vpon the whole realme an vniuersal calamitye & thraldome, vnlesse the mercifull goodnes of the Lorde do helpe, & some wise order be taken in staying these great extremities. MarginaliaThe effect of the L. Russels letter aunswering to the Lord Protectour.And as touching the Dukes request in his letters, for as much as he heard before of this broile of the Lords, & feared least some conspiracie had ben meant against the kings person, he hasted forwarde with such company as he coulde make, for the surety of þe king, as to him appertained. Now perceiuing by the Lordes letters sent vnto him the same sixte day of Octo. these tumults to rise vpon priuate causes betwene him and them, he therfore thought it expedient that a couenient power should be leuied, to be in a readines to withstand the worste (what perils soeuer might ensue) for the preseruation both of the king, & state of the realm from the inuasion of forraine enemies, and also for the staying of bloudshed, if any such thing should be intended betwixt the partes in the heate of thys faction. And this hee thinking beste for discharge of his allegeance, humbly beseecheth his grace to haue þe same also in speciall regard and consideration, first that the kings Maiestie be put in no feare, & that if there be any such thing wherein he hath geuen iust cause to them thus to proceede, hee will so conforme him selfe, as no such priuate quarels do rebound to the publike disturbance of the Realme: certifying moreouer the Duke, that if it were true whyche he vnderstandeth by the letters of the Lordes, þt he should send about proclamations and letters for raising vp of the commons, he liked not the same. Notwithstanding hee trusted well, that his wisedome woulde take such a way, as no effusion of bloud should follow.

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MarginaliaThe contents of the second aunswer of the L. Russell to the Lord Protector.And thus muche being contained in his former letters of the eight of October, in his next letters againe, wrytten the 11. day of Octob. the said Lord Russel 

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This is based on Inner Temple Library Petyt MS 538/46, fo. 470r-v. It is basically accurate but it drops some sharp reproaches Russell sent to Somerset for stirring up internal dissension.

reioysing to heare of the most reasonable offers of the Lord Protectour made to the Lordes, wryteth vnto him, & promiseth to doe what in the vttermost power of him (and likwise of sir W. Harbert ioyned together with him) doe lie, to worke some honorable reconciliation betwene him & them: MarginaliaThe good L. Russell a solicitor for peace betweene the Lord Protector and the Lordes. so as his sayd offers being accepted & satisfied, some good cōclusion might ensue, according to their good hope & expectation: Signifying moreouer, that as touching the leuyng of men, they had resolued to haue the same in readinesse for the benefite of the realme, to occurre all incōueniences whatsoeuer, either by forraine inuasion or otherwise might happen, & so hauing their power at hand, to drawe neare, wherby they might haue the better oportunitie to be solicitours, and a meanes for this reformation on both parties. &c. And thus much for answer of the Lord Russel to the Lorde Protectours letters.

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MarginaliaThe Lordes of the Coūcell assembled against the Lorde Protectour.But nowe to the matter of the Lordes, who together with the Earle of Warwike (vppon what occasion God knoweth) being assembled at London, as ye heard, against the Lorde Protector: when the king with his counsaile at Hampton court heard therof, first Secretarye Peter with the kings message was sent vnto them, whome the Lords notwtstanding detained still with them, making as yet no answer to the message. Wherupon the L. Protectour wryteth to them in this maner as followeth.

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A letter of the Lorde Protectour, to the Counsaile at London.

MarginaliaThe Lord Protectors letter to the Lordes of the Counsaile at London.MY Lordes, we commend 

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This is an accurate printing of Inner Temple Petyt MS 538/46, fo. 469r-v.

vs most hartily vnto you, & wheras the kings Maiestie was infourmed that you were assembled in such sorte as you doe and nowe remaine, and was aduised by vs and such other of his Counsaile as were then heere aboute his persone, to send M. Secretarie Peter vnto you, with such message as whereby mighte haue ensued the suretie of hys Maiesties persone, with preseruation of his realme and subiects, & the quiet both of vs and your selues, as maister Secretarye can well declare to you: his maiestie and we of his Counsaile heere doe not a litle maruel that you stay still with you the sayd M Secretarie, & haue not as it were vouchsafed to send aunswer to his Maiestie, neyther by him nor yet any other. And for our selues we doe much more maruell and are right sory, as both wee and you haue good cause to be, to see the manner of your doinges bente with violence, to bring the kings Maiesty and vs to these extremities. Which as we doe intende, if you wil take no other way but violence, to defend (as nature and our allegeaunce doeth binde vs) to extremitye of death, and to put all to Gods hand, who geueth victory as it pleaseth him: so that if any reasonable conditions and offers woulde take place (as hetherto none hath bene signified vnto vs frō you, nor we do not vnderstand what you do require or seeke, or what you do meane) & that you do seek no hurt to the kings Maiestiesperson: MarginaliaNo worde hetherto sent from the Lords to the Lord Protector, what they required of him to doe. as touching all other priuate matters, to auoid the effusion of Christian bloud, and to preserue the kings Maiesties person, his realme and subiectes, you shall finde vs agreeable to any reasonable conditions that you will require. MarginaliaReasonable cōditions offered by the Lord Protector. For we doe esteeme the kings wealth and tranquillitie of the realme, more then all other worldly things, yea more then our owne life. Thus praying you to send vs your determinate answer heerein by M. Secretarie Peter, or if you will not let him go, by this bearer: we beseeche God to geue both you and vs grace to determine this matter, as maye be to Gods honour, the preseruation of the king, and the quiet of vs all, which may be, if the fault be not in you. And so we bid you most heartily fare well. From the kings maiesties Castle of Windsore, the 7. of Octob. 1549.

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Your Lordships louing frend,
E. Somerset.

After these letters receiued, and the reasonable condition of the Lorde Protectour, and yet not much regarded condition of the Lordes, 

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This passage is a fairly clear indication of Foxe's pro-Somerset bias.

they persisting still in their pretended purpose, tooke this aduise: first to keepe them selues in the Citie of London, as strong as they might: and therfore calling vpon the Maior and the Aldermen, they willed them in any case to promise a good and substantiall watch by nyght, MarginaliaA solemne watch commaūded in London. and a good warde by day, for the safegard of their Citie, and the portes and gates thereof: which was consented vnto, and the Cōpanies of London in theyr turnes warned to watch and warde accordingly. 
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Foxe not only obtained two letters to the Lord Mayor and Common Council of London, he also has an account of their debates on whether to support efforts to topple Somerset. Clearly Foxe's source was a member of London's governing elite at the time.

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MarginaliaThe Citye of London pressed with 500. men to fetch the L. Protector.Then the sayd Lordes and Counsailours demaunded of the Lorde Maior and hys brethren 500. menne to ayde them to fetche the Lorde Protectour out of Windsore from the king: but therunto the Maior answeared, MarginaliaThe aunswere of the Lorde Maior to the Lordes.that he could graunt none aide without the assent of the common Counsaile of the cittie: wherupon the next day a common councell was warned. But in this meane time the said Lordes of the Counsaile assembled thēselues at the Lorde Maiors house of London, MarginaliaThe Lordes assembled in the L. Maiors house. who then was Syr Henrye Amcottes Fishmonger, and W. Locke Mercer, and sir Iohn Aileph Sheriffes of the said citie, and there the said Counsaile did agree and publishe a Proclamation foorthwith agaynst the Lorde Protector, the effect of which Proclamation was as followeth.

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MarginaliaThe effect of the proclamation set out agaynst the Lord Protector. 

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This is an abridged, but essentially accurate version of a proclamation issued by Edward VI. (For the full text see Troubles Connected with the Prayer Book of 1549, ed. Nicholas Pocock, Camden Society, First series 38 (London, 1884), pp. The proclamation was printed by Foxe's friend Richard Grafton and it is possible that he provided Foxe with a copy.

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1 First, that the Protector by his malitious and euill gouernment, was the occasion of all the sedition that of late happened within the realme.

2 The losse of the kings peeces in France.

3 That he was ambitious and sought his owne glorye, as appeared by building of most sumptuous & costly houses; in the time of the kings warres.

4 That hee esteemed nothinge the graue Counsell of the Counsailours.

5 That he sowed diuision betwene the Nobles, the gentlemen, and the commons.

6 That the Nobles assembled them selues together at Londō for none other purpose, but to haue caused the protectour to haue liued wythin limites, and to haue put such order for the suretie of the kings maiestie as appertained: what soeuer the Protectours doinges were, whyche they sayd were vnnaturall, ingrate, and traiterous.

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7 That the Protectour sclaundered the Counsaile to the king, and did that in him lay, to cause variaunce betweene the king and the nobles.

8 That hee was a great traitor, and therefore the Lordes desired the citie & commons to aid them, to take hym from the king.

And in witnes testimonie of the contents of the said Proclamation, the Lordes subscribed theyr names, whych were these.

The Lorde Rich, Lord
Chauncellour.
The Lord S. Iohn, lord
great maister, & pre-
sident of the Coun-
saile.
The Lord Marques of
Northampton.
The Earl of Warwike,
Lord great Cham-
berlaine.
The Earle of Arundel,
L. Chamberlaine.
The Earle of Shrews-
burie.
The Earle of South-
hampton, Wriothe-
sley.
Sir Thomas Cheyney
knighte, treasurer of
the kings house, and
Lord Warden of the
Cinque portes.
Syr Iohn Gage knight,
Constable of the
Tower.
Syr Wil Peter knight,
Secretarie.
Syr Edwarde North
knight.
Syr Edwarde Monta-
gue, chief Iustice of
the common place.
Syr Rafe Sadler.
Syr Iohn Baker.
Syr Edw. Wootton.
Doctour Wootton.
Deane of Cant.
Syr Rich. Southwell.
After
GGGg.ij.