Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Dangerfield

(at least 1476 - 1556)

Mother of William Dangerfield.

Mrs Dangerfield was at least eighty years old when she died. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

She died 'through lack of comfort' around the time that her daughter-in-law and grandchild perished in prison. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

 
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Edward Sharp

(1496? - 1556)

Aged man of unknown occupation. Martyr. Born in Wiltshire.

Edward Sharp was condemned and burned in Bristol on September 1556. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1953.

 
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James Brookes

(1512 - 1560).

DD (1546). Master of Balliol (1547). Vice chancellor of Oxford (1552). Bishop of Gloucester (1554 - 1559). Deprived of his see upon the accession of Elizabeth. Committed to prison where he died. (DNB)

James Brookes was made bishop of Gloucester, c. January 1554, (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

He was deprived under Elizabeth.

James Brookes was one of those holding a commission from Cardinal Pole to disinter Peter Martyr's wife and burn her bones. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

The examinations of John Hunt and Richard White before the bishops of Salisbury and Gloucester (Brookes and Capon), Dr. Geffre (chancellor) took place on 26 April 1557. 1570, p. 2254, 1576, p. 1947, 1583, p. 2054.

Foxe says that James Brookes died before Queen Mary, but he did not die until 1560. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Joan Dangerfield

(d. 1556)

Wife of William Dangerfield. Of Wootton-under-Edge, near Bristol.

Joan Dangerfield bore William ten children. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, pp. 1859-60, 1583, p. 1953.

When the tenth child was fourteen days old she and her child were seized by the authorities and placed in jail. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

The catholic prisoners with her would not allow her and the baby to get near the fire to get warm. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

Her child starved to death and she died soon afterwards. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

 
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Joan Waste

(1534? - 1556)

A blind, unmarried woman. Of All Hallows parish, Derby.

Joan Waste was the daughter of William Waste, barber, who used occasionally to make ropes. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1951.

She learned to knit hose and sleeves when she was around twelve or fourteen years old and to help her father. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

After her parents death, she lived with her brother, Roger Waste, during the reign of Edward VI. Roger took her to church to hear sermons in the vernacular. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

She became well versed in religion during Edward VI's reign. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

She saved money to buy a New Testament. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

She became acquainted with John Hurt, a prisoner in the common hall of Derby, who read to her from her New Testament. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

When John Hurt could not read to her, Joan Waste went to John Pemberton, clerk of the parish church of All Saints, Derby. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

Foxe lists her persecutors as: Ralph Bane, Anthony Draycot and Peter Finch, with the assistance of Richard Ward, William Bainbridge, John Dethick, Richard Blackwell, Richard Parchinson, Thomas Swinerton, George Poyser, Thomas Roper and John Reyner, [1563, p. 1545] and Sir John Port and Henry Vernon. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952

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Anthony Draycot had Waste apprehended in Derby. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

Waste was brought out of prison by Peter Finch. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

Articles were brought against her. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, pp. 2137-38, 1576, pp. 1858-59, 1583, p. 1952.

Waste said that the doctrine taught and sermons given by Dr Taylor were believed by Taylor and others to be a true doctrine. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

She was condemned by Thornden and Draycot. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

On the day of her death Joan Waste was accompanied to church by Draycot, Thomas Powthread, Henry Vernon, Master Dethick of Newhall and many others. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot preached a violent sermon against Joan Waste. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot demanded that the gentlemen and bailiffs witness Joan Waste's death. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Her brother, Roger Waste, held her hand on the way to the Windmill-pit, where she was burned in August 1556. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot went to an inn and slept during her execution. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

William Bainbridge, bailiff, testified to these events. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1953.

John Cadman, curate of Derby, testified to these events. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1953.

 
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John Cadman

Curate. Of Derby.

John Cadman testified to the events surrounding the death of Joan Waste. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1953.

 
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John Hart

(d. 1556)

Shoemaker. Martyr. Of Mayfield, Sussex.

John Hart was burned with three others at Mayfield in Sussex on 24 September 1556. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1953.

 
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John Horne

(d. 1556)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origin.

John Horne was burned at Wooten-under-Edge, Gloucestershire, with a woman, in September 1556. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2139, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1953.

[His name may have been Edward Horne. See J. G. Nichols, Narratives of the Reformation, (Camden Society Old Series, 77) pp. 69-70.]

 
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Mrs Bridges

Of Wootton-under-Bridges near Bristol.

Mrs Bridges appeared to be imprisoned for her beliefs but survived. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

She testified to the cruel treatment and deaths of William and Joan Dangerfield, their child and his mother. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

 
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Thomas Ravensdale

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of unknown occuptation. Of Rye.

Thomas Ravensdale was accused and examined by Christopherson, Richard Briesly (chancellor), Robert Tailor (deputy), Thomas Paccard (civilian), Anthony Clarke, and Alban Langdale (BD). He was condemned and martyred at Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Dangerfield

(d. 1556)

Of unknown occupation. Of Wootten-under-Edge, near Bristol.

William Dangerfield stayed away from his home for fear of persecution by the authorities. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1953.

His neighbours seized him when he came home to see his wife who was about to give birth to his tenth child. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

He was taken to Dr Brooks and placed in prison. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

His legs were so badly injured by the irons, that he nearly lost them because of the severe injuries inflicted. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

Brooks lied to Dangerfield, saying that his wife had recanted. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

After twelve weeks in prison, he was released to go home. He appeared to get ill en route there and died shortly afterwards. 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1953.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mayfield
Mayfeld, Mayfield
NGR: TQ 584 265

A parish in the hundred of Loxfield-Pelham, rape of Pevensey, county of Sussex. 5.5 miles south-west from Wadhurst. The living is a vicarage in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wotton Vnderhedge [Wotton Under Edge]
NGR: ST 765 925

A parish in the upper division of the hundred of Berkeley, county of Gloucester. 19 miles south-south-west from Gloucester. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Gloucester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1977 [1953]

Queene Mary. The Martyrdome of Ioane Wast. The story of William Dangerfield and his wife.

MarginaliaAnno 1556.sorte as is aboue prefixed, hath bene confessed to be very true, by diuers persons of worthy credite and yet liuing: and also hath bene specially perused and examined by W. Baynbridge, tofore mentioned, Bayliffe then of Darbye: who aswell of his own knowledge, as by speciall enquiry and conference, by him made, with diuers others, hath cer tified vs the same to be vndoubted: besides the Testimoniall of Iohn Cadman Curate of the sayd towne, 

Commentary  *  Close

One suspects that there may have been elements of both self-exculpation and a desire to blame local catholics in the readiness of these officials to send Foxe more information on John Waste.

and of other also, vppon whose honesty well knowne, and theyr report herein nothing differing from such as were best acquaynted with that matter, I haue bene here the more bold to commit this story to posteritie, for all good men to consider and to iudge vpon.

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Edwarde Sharpe. 
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Edward Sharpe

This account first appeared in the 1563 edition and was unchanged in subsequent editions. There is some, not entirely reliable, corroboration of Foxe's brief account of Sharpe (see K. G. Powell, The Marian Martyrs and the Reformation in Bristol [Bristol: 1972], p. 12).

MarginaliaSeptember. 8. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Edward Sharpe at Bristowe.ABout the beginning of the next month folowing, whiche was September, a certayn godly, aged, deuout, & zelous person of the Lords glory, borne in Wiltshyre, named Edward Sharpe, of the age of lx. yeares, or thereabout, was condemned at Bristow to the like Martyrdom where he constantly & manfully persisting in þe iust quarrel of Christes Gospell, for misliking and renouncing the ordinaunces of the Romishe Churche, was tryed as pure gold, and made a liuely sacrifice in the fire: in whose death as in þe death of all hys other saynts, the Lord be glorified and thanked for his great grace of constancy: to whom be praise for euer, Amen.

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¶ Foure suffered at Mayfield. 
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Four Burned at Mayfield, Sussex

The account of these four martyrs and of the Bristol carpenter appeared in the 1563 edition and remained unchanged in subsequent editions. The fact that the Bristol carpenter and two of the Sussex martyrs were unnamed indicates Foxe's difficulties in obtaining information on martyrs in the dioceses of Chichester and Bristol.

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MarginaliaSeptember. 24. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of fowre at Mayfield in Sussex.NExte after the Martyrdome of Edward Sharpe aboue sayd, followed iiii. which suffered at Mayfield in Sussex, the xxiiii. day of September. anno. 1556. Of whose names, ii. we finde recorded, and the other two we yet know not, and therefore according to our register, here vnder they be specified, as we find them.

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Iohn Hart. MarginaliaIohn Hart Tho. Rauensdale A shomaker, and a Coriar.
Thomas Rauensdale.

A Shomaker.
And a Coriar.

Which sayd. 4. being at the place where they shoulde suffer, after they hadde made theyr prayer, and were at the stake, ready to abide the force of the fire, they constantlye & ioyfully yelded their liues for the testimony of the glorious Gospell of Iesus Christ, vnto whome be prayse for euer, and euer. Amen.

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MarginaliaSeptember. 25. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of a Carpenter at Bristowe.The day after the Martyrdome of these foresayde at Mayfield, which was the 24. of September, an. 1556. was a young man (which by science was a Carpenter, whose name we haue not) 

Commentary  *  Close

There is no reliable confirmation of any carpenter being burned in Bristol.

put to death for the like testimonye of Iesus Christe at Bristowe, where he yelding himselfe to the tormentes of the fire, gaue vp his life into the handes of the Lord, with such ioyfull constancye and triumphe, as all the Church of Christe haue iust cause to prayse God for him.

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The martyrdome of Iohn Horne and a woman. 
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John Horne

This account first appeared in the 1563 edition and was unchanged in subsequent editions. Probably it should have been changed; it is certain that someone named Horne was burned at Wotton-under-Edge, but when this happened and the other circumstances of the execution are far from clear. A letter, which was probably sent to one of Foxe's sons, survives among Foxe's papers, correcting Foxe'saccount of this incident. The letter states that an Edward Horne was burned at Wotton-under-Edge in 1558 (not 1556). The letter, drawing on the testimony of Edward's septuagenarian son Christopher, states that Edward Horne's wife was condemned with him but she recanted and her life was spared (BL, Harley MS 425, fo. 121r; printed in J. G. Nichols, Narratives of Days of the Reformation, Camden Society, original series 77 [1859], pp. 69-70). This letter was probably correct about the martyr's name but wrong about the date; the writ authorizing Edward Horne'sexecution is dated 10 August 1556 (PRO C/85/203/3).

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Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Addenda: ref page 251

A communication from one John Deighton to Foxe ... stat[es] that no such person as John Horne suffered at Wootton-under-Edge; but that one Edward Horne suffered at Newcut, in the same diocese, about eight weeks before Queen Mary's death: this would be about Sept. 25th (the date assigned by Foxe in his Latin "Rerum Gestarum," &c., p. 730, and edit. 1563, p. 1546), but in A. D. 1558 not 1556. Deighton states that Horne's wife, who was condemned with him, recanted and escaped.

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MarginaliaSeptember. 27. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Iohn Horne, and a woman, at Wotton vnderhedge in Glocestershire.NOw, not long after the death of the sayde young man at Bristow, in the same moneth were two mo godly Martyrs cōsumed by fire at Wotton Vnderhedge in Glocestershyre, whose names are aboue specified, which dyed very gloriously in a constaunt fayth, to the terrour of the wicked, and comforte of the Godly. So graciously did the Lord worke in them, that death vnto them was life, and life with a blotted conscience was death.

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¶ A pitifull story concerning the vnmercifull handling of W. Dangerfield, and Ioane hys wife beyng in childbed, taken out of her house, wyth her sucking infant of 14. daies old, & layd in the common Iayle amongest theeues and murderers. 
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William Dangerfield

This account first appeared in the 1570 edition and was based on the accounts of individual informants in Wotton-under-Edge. It remained unchanged in subsequent editions.

MarginaliaThe cruell handling of W. Dangerfield and Ioane his wyfe in prison.WHen I had written and finished the story of þe Garnsey women, with the young infant there with them burned, and also had passed the burning of the poore blind woman Ioane Wast at Darby, I well hoped I shoulde haue found no moe such stories of vnmerciful cruelty shewed vppon seely 

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I.e., innocent.

women with theyr children and young infantes: but now cōming to the persecution of Glocester shyre about the partes of Bristow, I finde an other story of such vnmercifulnes shewed agaynst a woman in childbed, as farre from all charitie and humanitie, as hath ben

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anye other storye yet hetherto rehearsed, as by the sequele hereof may appeare.

In the Parish of Wotton Vnderhedge, not farre from Bristow, was dwelling one W. Dangerfield a right honest and godly poore man, who by Ioane Dangerfield his wife had ix. Children, and she nowe lying in childbed of the tenth. Thys William after he had bene abroad from his house a certayne space, for feare of persecution, hearing that his wife was brought to bed, repayred home to visite her, as naturall duety required, and to see his children, she being now deliuered foure dayes before.

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The returne of this man was not so soone known to some of his vnkinde & vncharitable neighbours, but they incensed with the spirite of MarginaliaNo charity in Popery to be noted.Papistrye, eftsoones beset the house about, MarginaliaW. Dangerfield apprehended his owne in house.and there tooke the sayd W. Dangerfield. & caryed him to prison, and so at length hee was brought to the Bishop, being then Doctor Brookes: in whose cruell handling he remayned a certayne space, so longe till hys legges almost were freated off with yrons.

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MarginaliaIoane the wyfe of W. Dangerfield taken with her young infant out of childbed, and had to prison.After the apprehension, of the Husband, the wife likewise was taken, with her younge borne childe, being but 14. dayes olde (as is sayde) out of her childbed, and caryed into the common Iayle, and there placed amongst theues and murderers, where both shee and her poore innocent found so small charitie amongest the catholicke men, that she neuer could come to any fire, but was driuen to warm the clothes that she should put about the childe, in her bosome.

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In the meane season while they lay thus inclosed in seuerall prisons, the husband and the wife, the Bishop beginneth to practise not with the woman first, as the serpent did with Eue, but with the man, craftily deceiuing his simplicitie, with fayre glosing wordes, MarginaliaDangerfield made to beleeue falsely, that his wyfe had recanted.falsely perswading him that his wife had recanted, and asking him, wherfore he should more stande in his owne conceate, then shee being as well learned as he, and so subtilly drew out a form of recantation, wherewith hee deceiued the simple soule. MarginaliaDangerfield vppon hope of his wiues recātation, consented to the Bishop.Whereunto after þt he had once graunted that hee would consent, although hee had not yet recanted, they suffered hym to go to his wife, where shee laye in the common Iayle.

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Then they with melting hartes opening their minds one to an other, when he saw hys wife not released, & perceauing that he had not done well, he declared vnto her þe whole matter, how falsely he was circumuented by þe subtile flatteringes of the Byshop, bearyng him in hand that certaynly she had recanted: and thus deceiuing me (sayde he) brought this vnto me, and so plucked out of hys bosome the copy of the recantation, whereunto he had granted his promise. MarginaliaThe wyfe lamented the fall of her husbād.At the sight whereof the wife hearyng what her husband had done, her hart claue a sunder, saying: Alacke, thus long haue we continued one, and hath Satan so preuayled, to cause you to breake your first vow made to Christ in Baptisme? And so departed the saide W. and Ioane his wife, with what heartes the Lorde knoweth. MarginaliaDangerfield lamenteth his promise made to the Bishop.Then began hee not a little to bewayle his promyse made to the Bishop, MarginaliaThe prayer of Dangerfield to God.and to make hys prayer to almighty God, desiring him that he might not liue so long as to cal euill good, and good euill: or light darkenes, or darkenes light, and so departed he home toward hys house: MarginaliaThe death of the husband.where by the way homeward (as it is affirmed) he took his death and shortly after departed according to his prayer, after he had endured in prison xii. weekes.

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After this, Ioane his wife continued still in prison with her tender infant, till at last she was brought before that Bishop to be examined. Whereunto what her aunswers were, it is not certainely knowne. Howbeit most like it is what soeuer they were, they pleased not the Bishoppe, as appeared by his ire increased agaynst the poore woman & her long continuance in the prison, together with her tender babe, which also remayned with her in þe Iayle, partaker of her Martyrdome, so long as her milke would serue to geue it sucke, till at length the childe being starued for colde and famine, was sent away when it was past al remedie, MarginaliaThe young infant famished in prison.and so shortly after dyed. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of the mother.And not long after þe mother also followed, MarginaliaThe death of the olde woman.besides the olde woman whiche was mother of the husband, of the age of 80. yeares and vpwarde. Who being left in the house after their apprehēsion for lacke of comfort there perished also.

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And thus haue ye in one story the deathe of foure together: first of the old woman, then of the husband, after that of the innocent childe, and lastly of the mother. What became of the other nine children, I am not perfectly sure, but that I partly vnderstand, that they were all vndone by the same.

This story is reported and testified as well by other as namely by MarginaliaM. Bridges persecuted the same tyme for Gods word, and witnes of this story.Mistres Bridges, dwelling in the same town,

and