Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
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Commentary on the Text
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1877 [1862]

¶ Here beginneth the xij. Booke conteynyng the bloudy doynges and persecutious of the aduersaries against the faithful and true seruauntes of Christ, with the particular processes and names of such as were put to slaughter from the beginnyng of Ianuary, Anno. 1557. and the fift of Queene Mary.
The order and maner of the Cardinals visitation in Cambridge, with the condemnyng, takyng vp, and burnyng the bones and Bookes of Bucer, and Paulus Phagius, anno. 1557. Ianuar. 9. 
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The Exhumation of Bucer and Phagius

This account is almost entirely based on Conrad Hubert's volume on the exhumation, burning and reinterment of the bodies of Martin Bucer and Paul Fagius in Cambridge and of Catherine Martyr in Oxford, the Historia vera de vita, obitu, sepultra condemnatione, exhumatione D. Martin Buceri et Pauli Fagii (Strasburg: 1562). This book was almost instantly translated into English: A briefe treatise concerning the burnynge of Bucer and Phagius, trans. Arthur Golding (London: 1562), STC 3966.

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In the 1563 edition, Golding's translation was simply reprinted. (Interestingly, although a manuscript copy of sections of the the Historia vera survives among Foxe's papers - BL, MS Lansdowne 388, fos. 251r-319v - and although Foxe unquestionably consulted the Historia vera - the 1563 account is not a fresh translation of the Historia vera but a very faithful reprinting of Golding's translation). Foxe also included a poem on Bucer by John Redman and an account of the exhumation of Catherine Martyr's body which he translated from the Historia vera. (Golding had not included this in his translation).

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In the 1570 edition, Foxe once again reprinted Golding's translation but deleted substantial portions of it. Some of this material was removed because it was inflamatory or offended powerful people, and some it was probably judged superflous and too concerned with the parochial affairs of Cambridge University. A large section dealing with the reinterment of Bucer and Fagius was dropped, probably because it took up too much paper, especially in view of the material added to this edition . This material seems to have been drawn from official records of the exhumation, which were probably kept at Lambeth Palace and sent to Foxe by Matthew Parker.

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No changes were made to this account in the 1576 edition. In the 1583 edition, Foxe reprinted the material on the reinterment of Bucer and Fagius which had last appeared in the 1563 edition.

MarginaliaAnno. 1557. Ianuary. 9. MarginaliaVisitation at Cābridge, with the burnyng of Martin Bucer and Paulus Phagius bones.CArdinall Poole, three yeares after hys retourne into Englande, hauyng somewhat withdrawen his minde from other affaires of the Realme, and hauyng in all pointes established the Romishe Religion, began to haue an eye to the Vniuersitie of Cambridge, whiche place among other, espe-

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cially seemed to haue nede of reformation out of hand. MarginaliaThe Inquisitours.To performe this charge, were chosen Cuthberte Scot, not long before consecrated Bishop of Chester, Nicholas Ormanet an Italian, Archeprieste of the the people of Bodolon, 

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Bovolone.

in the Dioces of Veron, professed in both the lawes, and bearyng the name of the Popes Datary, Thomas Watson, elected Bishoppe of Lincolne, Iohn Christopherson, elected Bishoppe of Chichester, and Henry Cole Prouost of the Colledge of Eton. There was good cause why the matter was especially committed to these persons. For as touching Ormanet, it is well knowen that hee was a manne of muche estimation with Iulius the thirde, at that time Bishoppe of Rome, and was appointed to come into England with Cardinall Poole, because without hys knowledge (as in whom he put his chief trust and confidence) the Bishoppe woulde haue nothyng done that was of any importance or weight.

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These persons thus appointed (in the meane while as the visitours were addressyng them selues to their iourney) MarginaliaA Citation sent before to doctor Andrew Perne Vicechauncellor.sent their letters with the Cardinals Citation before Doctour Andrew Perne, Vicechauncellour then of Cambridge, with the other Commissioners associate, commaundyng him to warne all the Graduates of the Vniuersitie in their name, to bee in a readines against the eleuēth daie of Ianuary betwixt eight and tenne of the clocke in the church of saint Mary the virgin: willyng hym especially to bee there hym selfe in presence, and also to sette forwarde all the residue to whose charge it belonged, that they shoud search out al Statutes, Bookes, Priuileges, and Monumentes apperteinyng to the Vniuersitie, or to any of the Colledges, or finally to any of them selues, and these to present the same before them at the day appointed, and euery man to appeare there personally: for they woulde not faile, but be there at the same tyme, to lay before them suche thinges as should seeme necessarie to thys charge of reformyng the Vniuersitie, and further to geue charge of all suche thinges as should seeme most for the profite and behoue of the same, together with suche thinges as were to be done on their parte, accordyng as should seeme most agreable to the Decrees of the Canon lawe.

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This Citation of the Cardinall beyng brought to Cambridge by Master Bullocke, was firste exhibited in the Conuocation house of the Regentes, and there openly red by the Orator of the Vniuersity the eleuenth daie of december.

After this, 

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This description of the establishment of the royal commissioners in Cambridge and their commission to investigate heresy in Cambridge was added in the 1570 edition and must have been drawn from official records of the visitation.

vppon the 24. of December, whiche was Christenmasse euen, the Vicechauncellour, MarginaliaPreparation in Cambridge towarde the visitation.with the heades of houses meetyng toether in the Scholes, it was there concluded, that the visitours charges should be borne by the Vniuersity and Colledges (which then cost the Vniuersitie an hundreth pound thicke) and also that no Master of any Colledge should suffer any of the felowes, scholers, or Ministers, to go forth of the towne, but to returne before the Visitation.

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On Friday, the viij. of Ianuary, the Queenes Commissioners, videlicet, Doct Perne Vicechauncellour, Doctor Seghwicke, Doctor Haruy, M. Franck, Kust, and an other who is here nameles, 

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Surviving records reveal that the unnamed commissioner was Thomas Yale, who, at the time of the 1570 edition, was vicar-general of Canterbury and dean of the Arches [see the Oxford DNB]. It was undoubtedly Yale's prominence, and his close ties with Matthew Parker and Edmund Grindal, which induced Foxe to conceal his activities in Cambridge in 1557.

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also with sir Iames Dyer, the Recorder, M. Chapman, Euered sittyng together in the Hall, certaine were there called by the appointment of L. Hawes, and charge giuen what should be done. And firste the Commission was read. Then were all the high Constables called to bryng in their preceptes, and sworne. Also ij. of euery Parishe of x. or xij. hundredes, were sworne to inquire of heresie, lollardy, conspiracie, seditious wordes, tales, and rumors against the Kyng and Queene. Item, for hereticall and seditious bookes, for negligēces and misdemeanour in the church, for obseruation of Ceremonies, for Ornamentes, and stocke of the church.

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We sayde at the firste, that the Cardinall thought the Vniuersitie to haue neede of reformation. MarginaliaThe cause why the reformation was taken in hande.The reason why he should thinke so, was this: either because the same of long continuaunce since any manne could remember, had cast of the Yoke of the Bishoppe of Rome, and cleaued to the wholsome doctrine of the Gospell, or els by reason that both for the late Schisme, not yet worne out of memory, and for the doctrine of Martine Bucer, who not long before openly in the sayd Vniuersitie interpreted holy Scripture, they saw many so sore corrupted and spotted with this infection, that (euen as when a fire is spread in a towne) vnlesse a speedy remedie were adhibited out of hande, it

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were