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Thematic Divisions in Book 5
1. Preface to Rubric 2. The Rubric 3. Mary's First Moves 4. The Inhibition5. Bourne's Sermon 6. The True Report7. The Precept to Bonner 8. Anno 15549. From 'The Communication' to 'A Monition' 10. Bonner's Monition11. Mary's Articles for Bonner 12. The Articles 13. From Mary's Proclamation to the 'Stile'14. From the 'Stile' to the 'Communication' 15. The 'Communication' 16. How Thomas Cranmer ... 17. Cranmer18. Ridley 19. Latimer20. Harpsfield's Forme 21. 1563's Disputational Digest22. Political Events up to Suffolk's Death 23. Between Mantell and the Preacher's Declaration 24. The Declaration of Bradford et al 25. May 19 to August 1 26. August 1 - September 3 27. From Bonner's Mandate to Pole's Oration 28. Winchester's Sermon to Bonner's Visitation 29. Pole's Oration 30. From the Supplication to Gardiner's Sermon 31. From Gardiner's Sermon to 1555 32. From the Arrest of Rose to Hooper's Letter 33. Hooper's Answer and Letter 34. To the End of Book X 35. The Martyrdom of Rogers 36. The Martyrdom of Saunders 37. Saunders' Letters 38. Hooper's Martyrdom 39. Hooper's Letters 40. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 41. Becket's Image and other events 42. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 43. Bonner and Reconciliation 44. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 45. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 46. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White47. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 48. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 49. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 50. Judge Hales 51. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 52. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 53. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 54. The Letters of George Marsh 55. The Martyrdom of William Flower 56. Mary's False Pregnancy57. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 58. John Tooly 59. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]60. Censorship Proclamation 61. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 62. Letters of Haukes 63. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 64. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain65. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 66. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 67. Bradford's Letters 68. William Minge 69. The Martyrdom of John Bland 70. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 71. Sheterden's Letters 72. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 73. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 74. John Aleworth 75. Martyrdom of James Abbes 76. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 77. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 78. Richard Hooke 79. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 80. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 81. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 82. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 83. Martyrdom of William Haile 84. Examination of John Newman 85. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 86. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 87. William Andrew 88. William Allen 89. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 90. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 91. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 92. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 93. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 94. John and William Glover 95. Cornelius Bungey 96. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 97. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 98. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 99. Ridley's Letters 100. Life of Hugh Latimer 101. Latimer's Letters 102. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed103. More Letters of Ridley 104. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 105. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 106. William Wiseman 107. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 108. John Went 109. Isobel Foster 110. Joan Lashford 111. Five Canterbury Martyrs 112. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 113. Letters of Cranmer 114. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 115. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 116. William Tyms, et al 117. The Norfolk Supplication 118. Letters of Tyms 119. John Hullier's Execution120. John Hullier 121. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 122. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 123. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 124. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 125. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 126. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 127. Thomas Rede128. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 129. William Slech 130. Avington Read, et al 131. Wood and Miles 132. Adherall and Clement 133. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 134. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow135. Persecution in Lichfield 136. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 137. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 138. John Careless 139. Letters of John Careless 140. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 141. Guernsey Martyrdoms 142. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 143. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 144. Three Men of Bristol145. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 146. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 147. John Horne and a woman 148. Northampton Shoemaker 149. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 150. More Persecution at Lichfield 151. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife152. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent153. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury154. The 'Bloody Commission'155. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester156. Five Burnt at Smithfield157. Stephen Gratwick and others158. Edmund Allen and other martyrs159. Edmund Allen160. Alice Benden and other martyrs161. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs162. Ambrose163. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper164. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs165. John Thurston166. Thomas More167. George Eagles168. Richard Crashfield169. Fryer and George Eagles' sister170. John Kurde171. Cicelye Ormes172. Joyce Lewes173. Rafe Allerton and others174. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston175. Persecution at Lichfield176. Persecution at Chichester177. Thomas Spurdance178. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson179. John Rough and Margaret Mearing180. Cuthbert Simson181. William Nicholl182. Seaman, Carman and Hudson183. Three at Colchester184. A Royal Proclamation185. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs186. Richard Yeoman187. John Alcocke188. Alcocke's Epistles189. Thomas Benbridge190. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs191. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver192. Three at Bury193. The Final Five Martyrs194. William Living195. The King's Brief196. William Browne197. Some Persecuted at Suffolk198. Elizabeth Lawson199. Edward Grew200. The Persecuted of Norfolk201. The Persecuted of Essex202. Thomas Bryce203. The Persecuted in Kent204. The Persecuted in Coventry and the Exiles205. Thomas Parkinson206. The Scourged: Introduction207. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax208. Thomas Greene209. Bartlett Greene and Cotton210. Steven Cotton's Letter211. Scourging of John Milles212. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw213. Robert Williams214. Bonner's Beating of Boys215. A Beggar of Salisbury216. John Fetty217. James Harris218. Providences: Introduction219. The Miraculously Preserved220. Christenmas and Wattes221. Simon Grinaeus222. John Glover223. Dabney224. Alexander Wimshurst225. Bosom's wife226. The Delivery of Moyse227. Lady Knevet228. Crosman's wife229. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk230. Congregation of London231. Robert Cole232. Englishmen at Calais233. John Hunt and Richard White234. Punishments of Persecutors235. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth236. The Westminster Conference237. Nicholas Burton238. Another Martyrdom in Spain239. Baker and Burgate240. Burges and Hoker241. Justice Nine-Holes242. Back to the Appendix notes243. A Poor Woman of Exeter244. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material245. Priest's Wife of Exeter246. Gertrude Crockhey
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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1153 [184]

Actes and Monumentes of the church

vnto their parishioners, and exhorte them that they esteme this grace accordingly, and recōcile them selues to the church before the first sonday after Easter next ensuing, whiche thing I also do cōmaunde by the tenour hereof, with intimation that the sayde tyme being ones past, & they not so reconciled, euery one of them shall haue processe made against him, according to the Canons, as the cause shall require: for which purpose the pastours and Curates of euery parish shalbe commaunded by their Archdeacon, to certifie me in wryting, of euery man and womans name, that is not so reconciled. Further, herewith I do signifie and declare vnto you, that our holy father the Pope Iulius the thirde, of that name, lyke a moste tender and naturall father, hearing of the retourne and recouerye of his prodigall childe this Realme of Englande, hath him self made much ioye & gladnes hereat, and also all other true Christen Realmes haue done the lyke. Exhorting you therefore in oure Lord, not to be vnthankeful your selues, or negligent in this behalfe, but diligētly to seke for it, ioyfully to embrace it, and fruictfully to vse it, remembring with al the monition & charge whiche came from me the last yeare, concerning your comming to confession in Lent, and receiuing the Sacrament at Easter, whiche moniciō to all effectes and purposes, I haue nowe here for repeted and renewed, charging you, and also all your Curates therewith. And because all our duties is, earnestly and deuoutly to praye for the prosperous estate of oure soueraignes, the Kyng and Quene of this Realme, I do finally require and praye you, as heartely as I can, to pray for their maiesties accordingly, and specially that it may please almightie God, to sende vnto her grace a good tyme, and to make her a glad mother, whiche can not bee but vnto vs all great ioye, muche comfort, and inestimable profite. Geuen at London, the. 19. daye of the moneth of February, in the yeare of oure Lord God, after the computation of the church of England. 1554. and of my translatiō the. 16.

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¶ The fourme of absolution, to be kept by the pastours and Curates, in priuate confessions, concerning this reconciliation.

OVr Lord Iesus Christ absolue you, and by the Apostolike autoritie to me graunted & committed, I absolue you from the sentēces of excommunication, and from all other censures and paines, into the which you be fallen, by reason of heresie, or schisme or any otherways, & I restore you vnto the vnitie of our holy mother the church, and to the communion of all Sacramentes, dispensing with you for al maner of irregularitie. And by the same autoritie, I absolue you from all your sinnes, in the name of the father, & of the sonne, & of the holy gost. Amen.

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The Martyrdom of Robert Ferrar

In Foxe's presentation, Ferrar's sufferings under Mary are almost an anticlimax to what he endured in the reign of Edward VI. This emphasis is already apparent in the Rerum, where Foxe blames Ferrar's troubles solely on the malice of George Constantine and on the duke of Northumberland, who, Foxe maintained, hated Ferrar because he was favoured by the duke of Somerset. (These charges against Northumberland would not be repeated in any of the editions of the Acts and Monuments. This is undoubtedly due to the power and influence of Northumberland's two sons Ambrose and Robert, in Elizabeth's reign). According to Foxe, Ferrar was stripped of his bishopric and imprisoned in the Fleet until the beginning of Mary's reign. (This is demonstably inaccurate; see Brown, pp. 216-18). He remained in prison under Mary until the end of January 1555, when he was sentenced to death. He was taken to Carmarthen and burned, dying a slow death because the wood for the fire was taken from a bog and was wet. The account ends with an interesting physical description of Ferrar, describing him as short, stout and swarthy (Rerum, pp. 423-25). Unlike many detailed accounts in the Rerum, there are no documents. All of this information seems to have come from a person familiar with St David's (the burning suggests an eyewitness account) and sympathetic to Ferrar.

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It is reasonable to suppose that this person was responsible for the flood of information about Ferrar that washed over Foxe before the 1563 edition was printed. Except for the detail of Ferrar being burned with wet wood, nothing from the Rerum account was reprinted in 1563. The reason for this was that Foxe had an enormous cache of papers pertaining to Ferrar's case to work from. Someone had copied these papers (probably from Ferrar's records) and sent them to Foxe, presumably in an effort to vindicate the bishop. (BL, Harley 420 consists largely of the papers in this collection which Foxe did not print. They all are written in a single hand, indicating that they were copied and sent to Foxe). Foxe constructed his narrative of Ferrar in Edward VI's reign entirely from these documents. The same individual was probably also responsible for sending Foxe copies of the official documents on which Foxe based his account of Ferrar's examinations in Wales in 1555 and his degradation there. An eyewitness seems to have supplied Foxe with his account of Ferrar's examination by Gardiner.

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Whoever Foxe's sources for the Rerum and 1563 accounts were, they succeeded in making Foxe an ardent champion of Ferrar. Foxe's printing of thedocuments in Ferrar's case is not only detailed, but it is very partisan. Foxe printed the basic complaint which Ferrar's opponents made to the privy council, but he did not even mention a further complaint (BL, Harley 420, fol. 90r-v charging Ferrar with sedition) and an affadavit supporting it (BL, Harley 420, fol. 92r), as well as Ferrar's denial of the charge (BL, Harley 420, fol. 93r). Nor did Foxe print many of the depositions against Ferrar (BL, Harley 420, fos. 80r-89v and 95r-104v) or the depositions of 124 witnesses testifying against Ferrar (BL, Harley 420, fos. 111r-178r). Even more striking is the fact that he printed this detailed pro-Ferrar account at all; he could have simply omitted this unsavoury feud and focused on Ferrar's martyrdom under Mary. One of Ferrar's opponents was Thomas Young, the first Elizabethan archbishop of York, and this could only have increased the pressure on Foxe for silence. (One of Foxe's friends wrote to the martyrologist begging him not to discuss this aspect of Ferrar's history; the best that Foxe would do was not name Young while the archbishop was alive). Foxe seems to have been genuinely outraged at Ferrar's treatment by his canons; perhaps Foxe's friendship with John Parkhurst - Elizabeth's first bishop of Norwich and another prelate circled by sharks - influenced him. (Foxe would know about Parkhurst's troubles; he lived at Parkhurst's palace in Norwich from 1560 to 1562 and his family resided there until 1563).

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Except for details about Ferrar's death, all the information which Foxe would ever print on Ferrar was in the 1563 edition. In the 1570 edition all the documents pertaining to Ferrar's Edwardian ordeals were omitted except for two letters which Foxe moved to the end of his account of Ferrar. (In this edition, Foxe also erroneously declared that Bishop Goodrich of Ely was the recipient of these letters). Foxe replaced the deleted documents with a brief narrative of Ferrar's troubles under Edward VI. He also replaced the account of Ferrar's execution with a new version, obviously drawn from an eyewitness, which gave the precise date of Ferrar's death and the story that, in a demonstration of stoicism, the martyr did not move in the flames. The 1570 account of Ferrar was reprinted in the 1576 edition without change.

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But in the 1583 edition, Foxe restored all of the documents that had appeared in 1563 and were deleted afterwards. This appears to have been done without much care since the two letters Ferrar purportedly wrote to Goodrich were restored along with the other documents from the first edition but also printed at the end of the account, as they were in the 1570 edition. As result the letters are printed twice in 1583 (on pp. 1552-53 and 1555-56).

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¶ The history of Maister Robert Farrar Bishop of Saint Dauids in Wales, who most constantly gaue his life for the testimony of the truth in the yere of our Lorde 1555. the xxii. of February. 
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The date is incorrectly given as 22 February in 1563.

THe next bishop, that suffered in this cataloge of blessed Martirs, after the passion of Maister Hoper, was Maister Farrar, bishop of saint Dauids in Wales, who by the fauour & good will of the

Lord Protector, was first called and promoted to that dignitye. This man I maye well call twise a martyr, not onlye for those thinges which he suffered most cōstantly in the dayes of Quene Mary, vnto the very fire, & the sheding of bloud: but also for diuers other iniuries & molestations in king Edwards time whiche this firm & constant champiō suffered most vnworthely of his enemies, after the fall of the Duke of Somerset. Of these his vexations, and troubles what was the true cause and matter therof, and what were the procedinges of both the parties, as wel of the bishop as of his aduersaries, and what his aduersaries were, the full declaration hereof here foloweth.

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The principall aduersaries, against Maister Ferrar Bishop of Saint Dauids in the time of King Edward were:

1. Firste, George constantine to whome the sayd bishop gaue thoffice of Registershippe by patent.

2. The second was a Doctor of law,  

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On 29 January 1561 Richard Pratt, a friend of the martyrologist, wrote to Foxe and asked him not to discuss Ferrar's feud with his canons as it would create scandal and encourage the catholics, particularly since Thomas Young was about to become archbishop of York (BL, Harley 416, fol. 170r-v). Foxe obliged to the extent of witholding the names of Meyricke and Young from his first edition. In the second edition, with both men dead, he supplied their names and even identified Meyricke ashaving been bishop of Bangor and Young as having been archbishop of York.

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and Canon of the cathedrall church.

3. The Chaunter 

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On 29 January 1561 Richard Pratt, a friend of the martyrologist, wrote to Foxe and asked him not to discuss Ferrar's feud with his canons as it would create scandal and encourage the catholics, particularly since Thomas Young was about to become archbishop of York (BL, Harley 416, fol. 170r-v). Foxe obliged to the extent of witholding the names of Meyricke and Young from his first edition. In the second edition, with both men dead, he supplied their names and even identified Meyricke ashaving been bishop of Bangor and Young as having been archbishop of York.

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of the cathedral churche of Saint Dauids.

THrough the procuremente and instance of these his aduersaries, ioyning and confederate together, one Hugh Raulins priest, and Thomas Lee brother in law to the said George Constantine, did exhibit to the kings most honorable coūsell certein articles and informations, 

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Foxe does not supply any details of a quarrel which been festering between Ferrar and his canons long before this denunciation of Ferrar was sent to the privy council. Over a year before this document was written, Ferrar had suspended some of his leading opponents from their diocesan offices and they had appealed to the Council of the Marches. And along with the complaint made against Ferrar to the privy council, another complaint had been brought against Ferrar in the Court of Great Sessions in Carmarthen. (For the details of the feud between Ferrar and his canons, see Brown, pp. 82-185).

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conceiued and deuised by the persons before named, to the intent to blemish þe bishops credit, and vtterly (as they thought and made their boste) to pul him from his bishoprike, and to brīg him in a premunire. 
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This was originally a series of statutes enacted in 1353, 1365 and 1393, limiting appeals to the papacy by English clerics and prescribing penalties for those promoting a papal bull or excommunication in England. By Ferrar?s day it had come to be used as a legal term for any clerical usurpation of royal power or authority.

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The copy of which articles, we thought good here to expresse, and so after them to set his aunswers to the same.

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Articles and informations to the kynges honorable counsel, put vp and exhibited by Hugh Raulins, and Thomas Lee, against the blessed man of God, Maister Ferrar, byshop of saynt Dauids. 
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This is an indictment Ferrar's opponents sent to the privy council accusing the bishop (in no less than 56 articles) of praemunire and other misdeeds. The first 18 articles consist of actual charges of praemunire (i.e., the bishop having usurped royal perogatives) and these take two forms: cases where Ferrar allegedly overrode vested rights of patronage (articles 2-4, 7, 14 and 15) and cases where Ferrar, either through ignorance or willfulness, acted illegally (articles 1, 5-6, 8-13 and 16-18). The remaining articles are intended to show that Ferrar was an unfit bishop because of a failure to enforce the religious reforms enacted by the government (articles 19-24), greed (articles 25-47) or sheer incompetence (articles 48-56). None of these were legal reasons to deprive a bishop (whereas praemunire was) but they were intended to convince the privy council that depriving Ferrar was desirable and thus reinforcea weak case. Readers desiring more background on the details behind these charges should consult Andrew J. Brown's superb monograph on Ferrar.

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¶ Abuse of the autority to him committed.

 

Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
Farrar

There is a long section dealing with the stirring in Farrar's diocese under Edward. This precedes the account of Farrar's troubles under Mary and leads to a different balance in the glosses from the previous few martyrs. The many articles against Farrar are noted in the 1563 and 1583 editions only; readers are advised in 1570 and 1576 to consult a copy of 1563. The 1583 glosses seem to have been set from the 1563 version. In these glosses, Foxe occasionally uses terms supportive of Farrar, describing the charge of Praemunire against him as 'pretensed' ('Premunire pretended agaynst B. Farrar') and noting the 'crafty packing' of his opponents ('Crafty packing agaynst Farrar'). Stoical phrases such as 'stoutly standeth' are used, along with commendation of constancy ('B. Farrar stoutly stādeth vpon his truth'; 'B. Farrar standeth to his oth made to the K. agaynst the Pope'; 'A memorable example of constancie in this blessed B. & Martyr'). The familiar charge that Winchester once supported the royal supremacy is introduced when opportunity serves ('Winchesters periury touched'), and there is a repeat of the restrained drawing attention to an appeal to the cardinal ('B. Farrar appealeth from the B. of S. Dauids to the Cardinall'). There is a mistaken date in 1583 (March 32) which was correctly given as March 30 in 1570 and 1576.

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Marginalia1.IN primis when the sayde byshop fyrste came to hys dyocesse, he appoynted hys chauncelor by hys letters of commyssyon, omytting the kynges maiestyes style and autoryty, and groundyng his said commissiō vpon forrein vsurped lawes and autoritie: 
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This is a good example of the desperate efforts of Ferrar's opponents to make a case for praemunire. Because a reference to the royal supremacy had been inadvertantly omitted from a commission Ferrar issued, his opponents were maintaining that he based his claim to episcopal authority upon 'foreign usurped laws' (i.e., papal, rather than royal, authority). This is ridiculous; Ferrar was a controversial bishop, but he was a thoroughgoing reformer.

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by force of whiche autoritie his sayde Chauncelour did visite certeyn deanries of his saide diocesse, and monished the Chauntor and chaptre of the cathedrall churche of Saint Dauids afore sayde, against a certaine daye and place, for lyke entent and purpose, contrary to the kinges highnes lawes and statutes, and in derogation of his highnes supremacie.

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Marginalia2.Item, 

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Details of this dispute are in Brown, pp. 151-52.

that the said Chauntour and chaptre, perceiuyng the faultes of the saide commission, tooke the same from the Registre into their custodye, refusyng to appeare by vertue thereof, and by secreate and charytable wayes and

meanes