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124 [1141]

Actes and Monumentes of the churche

buried at Worcester, and not by testament. for that place of the realme in those daies appered most sure and safe, wher they which wer frēds to the crowne might best deliberate with them selfes in that matter, what was best to be done. So went they from thence to the town of Gloster, with William Marshall Earle of þe same, and there was he annoynted & crowned king, by the Legate Gnalo, assisted by Peter Bishop of Winchester, and Ioceline þe bishop of Bath, with other which then were in the realme, and called Henry the thyrd, and this was doone on the feastfull day of the Apostle Simon & Iude. The court of Rome that tyme, not beyng to slacke in theyr affayres, sente hither with all spede, commaunding that they should mightely stande by the yong king, than being not fully ten yeares of age, and to defend England wt armour, and his thūdryng curses, as holy churches patrimony, against Ludouicke and his cōplices, and then new Pope Honorius þe thyrd, not onely confirmed his Legate Gnalo, but also committed to his discretion, all that appertayned to that office of his, no appellations to the contrary admitted. Vppon this authoritye the Legate being bold, compelled the Prelates of Englande to bee sworne true to the younge king: and those that refused to take that othe, he punished very sore. And Peter the Bishop of Winchester was not all behinde in that cōmission for his part, but brought a greuous tallage vpon the beneficed men and priests of his dioces, to helpe the king in his warres against Lewis, which was not al amisse, suche as wer great beneficed priestes, and might well pay þe saide Gnalo reserued to his own authoritye, & for great summes of money, at the latter dispēsed with them. Some that were obstinate & frowarde, he disgraded: some he excommunicated and sēt to Rome for theyr absolutions, not leauing one priest vnpunished, that had takē part with Lewis, hauing euery where his searchers and spies to finde them out. MarginaliaHouedenusAnd the next yere after, whiche was. 1218. from Christes incarnation, he made a generall inquisition nigh al the realm ouer, for them which did not obserue the interdiction published for rebelles, in the fyrste yeare of this yong king: for whose transgressiō bothe to Priestes and Monkes he appoynted diuers and many penalties greuous, some suspēded from theyr offices, and some depriued from theyr benefices. So that bothe as well the vngilty as the gilty, were compelled largelye to pay.

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The nexte yeare after that, whiche was in an. 1219. was Gnalo called home vnto Rome again for the holy father, as Matheus Paris reporteth, then greatly laboured of a spirituall dropsy, whome he thought his Legate to be able some what to remedy, hauing so large occupiynges in Englande, and for so long time. forthat Legate by that tyme had wel fauouredlye vnloden the purses of the beneficed fathers and Cloysterers. So that he retourned with all hys bagges well stuffed, leauing Pandulphe behinde him to supplye that Baillywicke of his great graundfather Iudas. Hugh Welles then B. of Lincolne, not long afore, payed a thousād markes for recoueraunce of his office, & a hundred marke to the Legate for his fauoure also in that case: other holy Bishops and Prelates lykewyse were taughte by his good exaumple to qualify that great heat, or dry thrust of the Pope, Robert Curson that time beynge a Priest Cardinall in Rome.

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MarginaliaThe death of king IhōManye opinions are among the Chronycle writers of the death of king Iohn. Some of thē dothe wryte that he died of sorrowe and heauines of heart, as Polidorus: some of surfetynge in the nighte, as Radulphus Niger: some of a bloudy flixe, as Roger Houeden: some of a burning ague, some of a colde sweate, some of eating appels, somme of eatinge peares, somme plummes. &c.

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MarginaliaMat. Parisi. in vita Ioannis Regis.Thus you see what varietie is among the wryters concerning the death of Iohn, king of Englande. Of whiche wryters althoughe the most agree in this that he was poysoned by the Monke aboue named: yet Math. Parisiensis somethynge differinge from the other, writeth thus concerning his death: that he going from Lin to Lincolnshire, and there hearyng of the losse of his cariage, and of his treasures vppon the washes, fell in great heauines of minde, in so muche that he fell thereby into a feruent feuer, being at the Abbey of Swinested. Thys ague hee also increased throughe euill surfetting and noughty diet, by eating Peaches and drinking of newe Ciser, or as we call it Sidar. Thus being sick, was caryed from thence to þe Castell of Laford, and from thence to the Castell of Newerke, where callinge for Henrye his sonne, gaue to him þe successiō of his crown and kingdome, wryting to all his Lordes and nobles to receue him for their king. And shortly after vpon sainct Lucies euen, departed this lyfe, being buryed at Worcester &c.

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MarginaliaPope Innocētius. 3The lyfe and Actes of Pope Innocentius the thyrde, are partly descrybed before, how he intruded Stephen Langton against the kyngs wil, into tharchbishoprick of Canterbury, styrring vp also. lxiiii. Monkes of the same church of Canterbury, priuily to worke agaynste the Kyng. Moreouer how he did excommunciate þe sayde kyng as a publike enemy of the churche, so long as the sayde kyng withstode his tyrannical doinges, putting him and his whole kingdome vnder interdiction, for the space of syxe yeares, and thre monethes. And at lengthe deposed and depriued him from his scepter, keping it in his owne handes for fiue dayes. how he absolued all his subiectes from theyr dewe

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obedience