Navigate the 1563 Edition
PrefaceBook 1Book 2Book 3Book 4Book 5
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
135 [1237]

a lawyer, with. xxx. other scholars apprehēded, and caryed to Wallingforde Castel, frō thence had in Cartes to London, where at length thorow much entreaty of þe bishops, wer brought barefote to the Legates doore, where they had their pardon, and the vniuersity released of interdiction. And thus much conerning þe Popes Legates in England.

[Back to Top]

And thus partly you haue heard and do vnderstand the miserable thraldome and captiuitie of this realme of Englande and the clergye of the same, who before refused to take parte wt king Iohn, theyr naturall prince againste the forrein power of the Pope, and now how miserably they are oppressed & scourged of the same Pope. Whose insatiable extortion and rapacitye did so excede in pilling and polling of thys realme long after this, that neither the kynge now could help them, neyther coulde the Pope with any reasonable measure be content. MarginaliaThre score thousande Florens cōtributed to the Pope in one yere of the clergy.Insomuche (as wryters record) in the dayes of Sudbury Archbyshop of Caunterbury. 1360. the Pope by his procters gat from the Clergie in lesse then one yeare more then. lx. thousande florences, of mere contribution, besydes his other auayles, and common reuenues out of benefices, prebendaries, first fruites, his tributes, his Peter pence, collations, reseruatiōs relaxations, and suche marchandise. &c.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThis yeree remembraunce is e offring p a lace in de of. &c.And yet the state of this realm of England (although moste miserable) was not so lamentable, but the case of Germanye and of the Emperour Fredericke the second 

Commentary  *  Close
Frederick II

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

was then as much or more pitiful, who in the same tyme of king Henry the third, who was so persecuted & disturbed by Pope Innocentius, Honorius, Gregorius, Celestinus, Innocentius the. iiii. that not onely with theyr curses and excommunications most wretchedly they did infame, impugne, and assault him, but also in open fielde, continually they dyd warre againste him, and all with English mennes money. Albeit concerning the troubles of this Emperoure, being a forrein story and perteining to other coūtryes, I haue not much to do nor to write therin, hauing inough already to story at home. Yet I cā not but lament and maruell to see the ambicyous presumption, and tragicall furye of those Popes against their Emperor: fyrst they made him Emperoure against Otho, whom they depriued, then for claiming his right in Apulia, and Sicilia, whereof he was king, they accursed him. Afterwarde when they had warred against him in Apulia, they sent him to the Turkes to fight, who the same time recouered Hierusalem, Nazareth, & Ioppe, frō the Souldane. In the meane time while the Emperour was occupied in these warres, these vnholly fathers inuade his landes and possessions at home, subduing Apulia vnder his owne possession, inhybiting his souldious to go ouer to him. MarginaliaNote a uche of Antichrist

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaPope Gregory the. ix.Moreouer when the Emperour had sent to the Pope & other Christian princes his letters gratulatorie, declaring what God wrought by him against the Turkes, the Pope slayeth the messengers, and kepeth the letters close, that they should gooe no farther. This was Pope Gregorius the ix. causing moreouer to be noised abroade, that the Emperour was dead. All this the Pope did because he would subdue the cities of Apulia, whiche would not otherwyse be subiect vnto him. And moreouer because the sayde Emperour should be there stayde for not comming home, the sayde Pope wryteth to the Soldane that he should in no cause rēdre the holy lande into the Emperours hand. Neuertheles the Emperour hearing this sturre of the Pope, and hauing treuse with the Soldane for x. yeres, repayreth home. Where first cōming to Apulia, driueth out the Popes armie, (the Lorde so prospering him in his doyngs:) also recouereth al the Pope had got from him before. The Pope pickyng quarell where none was geuen, laieth his curse vpon the Emperour for makyng truse with the Soldane: also maketh conspiracie with the Tusches and Lombardes against him. MarginaliaNote the price of the Popes absolution.The Emperour at the instigatiōs of his princes, glad to compose with the tyrant was faine to raunsome the absolution of the Pope for an hūdreth thousand ounces of gold.

[Back to Top]

And yet not so contented, sent to the princes of Germany, charging them to admitte none of the Emperours stocke to bee kynge of Romaynes: moreouer styrreth vp the cities of Italy against him. The Emperor hearinge this and vnderstanding the Popes subtile traines, marcheth vp to Italy, where he putteth down the rebelles, recouereth againe the cities belonging to the Empyre, Lombardy, Viterbium, Perusium, Fauentiam, Cremonā, Vicentiā, Patauium &c. Wherfore a newe excommunication was layde vpon the Emperour, and all his subiectes released of theire obedience and loyaltie to their Prince: moreouer much indulgence and euerlasting lyfe promysed to them that would fight against him. After this Gregory succeded Celestin9. 4. who reigned not long.

[Back to Top]

After hym came Innocentius the fourthe, a bitter enemy likewise against the saide Fridericke, who to aunswer the steppes of his predecessours, first calleth a generall counsel at Lyons, wherof mention is made before. In the whiche counsell the sayde Innocent standynge vp, dothe cite the Emperour. His Legate there present requireth lawfull tyme to bee geuē for him to come. whiche the Pope would in no case graunt, but in his full heate of fury & malyce, dothe denounce him accursed: moreouer dothe depriue him of his Emperial dignity, charging him with heinous crimes of periury and sacrylege, writing also letters and libels of diffamations to al kinges, princes and potentates. Vn

[Back to Top]
to
** .I. *