Navigate the 1563 Edition
PrefaceBook 1Book 2Book 3Book 4Book 5
Thematic Divisions in Book 5
1. Preface to Rubric 2. The Rubric 3. Mary's First Moves 4. The Inhibition5. Bourne's Sermon 6. The True Report7. The Precept to Bonner 8. Anno 15549. From 'The Communication' to 'A Monition' 10. Bonner's Monition11. Mary's Articles for Bonner 12. The Articles 13. From Mary's Proclamation to the 'Stile'14. From the 'Stile' to the 'Communication' 15. The 'Communication' 16. How Thomas Cranmer ... 17. Cranmer18. Ridley 19. Latimer20. Harpsfield's Forme 21. 1563's Disputational Digest22. Political Events up to Suffolk's Death 23. Between Mantell and the Preacher's Declaration 24. The Declaration of Bradford et al 25. May 19 to August 1 26. August 1 - September 3 27. From Bonner's Mandate to Pole's Oration 28. Winchester's Sermon to Bonner's Visitation 29. Pole's Oration 30. From the Supplication to Gardiner's Sermon 31. From Gardiner's Sermon to 1555 32. From the Arrest of Rose to Hooper's Letter 33. Hooper's Answer and Letter 34. To the End of Book X 35. The Martyrdom of Rogers 36. The Martyrdom of Saunders 37. Saunders' Letters 38. Hooper's Martyrdom 39. Hooper's Letters 40. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 41. Becket's Image and other events 42. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 43. Bonner and Reconciliation 44. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 45. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 46. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White47. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 48. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 49. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 50. Judge Hales 51. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 52. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 53. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 54. The Letters of George Marsh 55. The Martyrdom of William Flower 56. Mary's False Pregnancy57. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 58. John Tooly 59. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]60. Censorship Proclamation 61. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 62. Letters of Haukes 63. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 64. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain65. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 66. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 67. Bradford's Letters 68. William Minge 69. The Martyrdom of John Bland 70. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 71. Sheterden's Letters 72. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 73. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 74. John Aleworth 75. Martyrdom of James Abbes 76. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 77. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 78. Richard Hooke 79. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 80. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 81. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 82. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 83. Martyrdom of William Haile 84. Examination of John Newman 85. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 86. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 87. William Andrew 88. William Allen 89. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 90. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 91. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 92. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 93. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 94. John and William Glover 95. Cornelius Bungey 96. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 97. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 98. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 99. Ridley's Letters 100. Life of Hugh Latimer 101. Latimer's Letters 102. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed103. More Letters of Ridley 104. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 105. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 106. William Wiseman 107. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 108. John Went 109. Isobel Foster 110. Joan Lashford 111. Five Canterbury Martyrs 112. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 113. Letters of Cranmer 114. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 115. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 116. William Tyms, et al 117. The Norfolk Supplication 118. Letters of Tyms 119. John Hullier's Execution120. John Hullier 121. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 122. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 123. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 124. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 125. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 126. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 127. Thomas Rede128. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 129. William Slech 130. Avington Read, et al 131. Wood and Miles 132. Adherall and Clement 133. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 134. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow135. Persecution in Lichfield 136. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 137. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 138. John Careless 139. Letters of John Careless 140. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 141. Guernsey Martyrdoms 142. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 143. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 144. Three Men of Bristol145. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 146. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 147. John Horne and a woman 148. Northampton Shoemaker 149. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 150. More Persecution at Lichfield 151. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife152. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent153. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury154. The 'Bloody Commission'155. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester156. Five Burnt at Smithfield157. Stephen Gratwick and others158. Edmund Allen and other martyrs159. Edmund Allen160. Alice Benden and other martyrs161. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs162. Ambrose163. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper164. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs165. John Thurston166. Thomas More167. George Eagles168. Richard Crashfield169. Fryer and George Eagles' sister170. John Kurde171. Cicelye Ormes172. Joyce Lewes173. Rafe Allerton and others174. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston175. Persecution at Lichfield176. Persecution at Chichester177. Thomas Spurdance178. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson179. John Rough and Margaret Mearing180. Cuthbert Simson181. William Nicholl182. Seaman, Carman and Hudson183. Three at Colchester184. A Royal Proclamation185. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs186. Richard Yeoman187. John Alcocke188. Alcocke's Epistles189. Thomas Benbridge190. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs191. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver192. Three at Bury193. The Final Five Martyrs194. William Living195. The King's Brief196. William Browne197. Some Persecuted at Suffolk198. Elizabeth Lawson199. Edward Grew200. The Persecuted of Norfolk201. The Persecuted of Essex202. Thomas Bryce203. The Persecuted in Kent204. The Persecuted in Coventry and the Exiles205. Thomas Parkinson206. The Scourged: Introduction207. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax208. Thomas Greene209. Bartlett Greene and Cotton210. Steven Cotton's Letter211. Scourging of John Milles212. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw213. Robert Williams214. Bonner's Beating of Boys215. A Beggar of Salisbury216. John Fetty217. James Harris218. Providences: Introduction219. The Miraculously Preserved220. Christenmas and Wattes221. Simon Grinaeus222. John Glover223. Dabney224. Alexander Wimshurst225. Bosom's wife226. The Delivery of Moyse227. Lady Knevet228. Crosman's wife229. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk230. Congregation of London231. Robert Cole232. Englishmen at Calais233. John Hunt and Richard White234. Punishments of Persecutors235. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth236. The Westminster Conference237. Nicholas Burton238. Another Martyrdom in Spain239. Baker and Burgate240. Burges and Hoker241. Justice Nine-Holes242. Back to the Appendix notes243. A Poor Woman of Exeter244. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material245. Priest's Wife of Exeter246. Gertrude Crockhey
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
1610 []

At my retourne into England agayne, my chaunce was to meete with Palmer in Paules, where a roode was set vp. (This our meting was in the beginning of Quene Maryes reigne, and our myserable departing not longe before thende of Kinge Edwardes days). Then after our greting, thus sayd Palmer. Bullingham, is this our god, for whome we haue smarted? No Palmer (quod I): it is an image of him. An Image quod he? I tel the plainely Bullingham, Ihon Caluine (whose institutions I haue perused sith our departure) telleth mee plainly by Gods worde that it is an Idole, and that the Pope is Antichrist, and his clergy the fylthy sink hole of hell: and now I beleue it. For I feele it sensibly. O that God had reueled these matters vnto me in times past. I woulde haue bequeathed this romish religion or rather irreligion to the Deuil of hel from whence it came. Beleue them not Bullingham. MarginaliaBeholde his earnestnes nowe he is turned to the truth.I wyl rather haue these knees pared of, then I wil kneele to yonder iacknapes (meaning the rode) God healpe me I am borne to trouble and aduersity in this world. Wel Palmer (sayd I) is the wind in that corner with you? I warrant you it wyl blow you to litle ease 

Commentary  *  Close

This was the name of a notorious dungeon in the Tower of London.

at thend. I wil neuer haue to do with you agayne. So I lefte Pamer walking in Paules, who thorow the element of fyer is exalted aboue the elementes, where eternall rest is prepared for persecuted martires. Thus much is true: and let it be knowen that I Bullingham affirme it to be true. More I haue not to saye. I these wordes and dedes it appereth that God had elected him. From Bridgewater. April. 25. Anno. 1562.

[Back to Top]

By mee Ihon Bullingham.

Albeit that we know not, nor can herebye gather certainely whether he was conuerted before the visitors did restore him to his felowship agayne or after, yet in these letters among many things els besides, we may note that in Qnene Maryes reigne he became of an obstinate papist, an earnest Gospeller, which thing is confirmed by farther reporte of those that did then knowe hym wel. For they saye þt he neuer hated the truth more stubbernely then he embraced the trueth willingly, when it pleased God to open his eyes, and to shew vnto him the light of his word. And now agayne, when he should come to church at this time, there to be occupied among the reste in singing of respondes, reding of legendes, and suche like duties as were allotted vnto hym, he had as much pleasure to be at them as a beare to bee bayted and vexed with dogges. When he cam, it was more to auoyd displeasure and suspicion, then for any good wil and ready affection. When he should kepe his bowing measures at the Confiteor, in turninge of him selfe vpward and downward, and knock his brest with idolatrous adoration at the eleuation tyme, his hart dyd so vehemently ryse against it, that euen then he wold get him out of the church to auoid those vngodly gestures. To be short, because he would not ioyne quietnes of conscience and that liuing together

[Back to Top]

he addresseth him selfe to departe the house, only requiring maister Cole (then president) 

Commentary  *  Close

Note that in 1563 Foxe credited Cole with a desire to aid Palmer and 'agood civill disposition'. As Foxe become more aware of Cole's Marian activities, this praise was removed.

to write commendatory letters in his behalfe for the obtayning of a schole, which he much desired to haue for quietnes sake. M. Cole (being to say the truth a man of a good ciuill nature) though he halfe suspected that he was no sound catholicke: yet hopinge the best, perfourmed his desire. So he getteth him awaye: and the next word that men heard was, that by doctor Geoffrey he was imprisoned, either for certayne wordes boldly by him spoken, of which he was accused vnto the said Geoffrey at his visitation at Newbery: or els (whiche we thinke more true) because he procured a certaine protestation of his faith to be exhibited to the visitours ther. for (as it is thought) partly by his priuate reading, and partly by conference with other, his conscience so boyled for remembraunce of his wickednes, with participating wt them at the popish supersticions afore time committed, and with the consideration of the present misery, and cruelty shewed to the christians, in that raginge and violent tyme of persecution, that he both labored and soughte by all meanes to geue some testimony of his faith, either by writinge or other wise, and to acknowlege his transgressing of the commaundementes of God by his dissimulation. Whereupon certified of doctor Geoffreys visitation at Newbery, he neuer cessed till he had procured a testimony of hys faith (the copy whereof we cannot get) to be deliuered to Geoffrey, who reading the same, put him in prison, and within a forthnight after, or there aboute, like a most cruel tiraunt burned him wt two other at one stake, who being resolued into ashes, yelded vnto God as ioyful a soule, (confirmed with the swete promises of Christ) as any one that euer was called beside to suffer for his blessed name. God graunt vs all to be moued with the like spirit when soeuer gods gospell is oppugned of the adueraries. Amen.

[Back to Top]
A lamentable, horrible, and pitifull history, ful of most cruell and tirannical murder, done of the wretched papists, vpon three women and an Infant to wyt, the Grandmother, the Aunt, the Mother, and the chylde, in the Isle of Garnesey, for Christes true religion, the yeare of our Lord. 1556. Iuly: 18. 
Commentary  *  Close
The Guernsey Martyrs

Almost from the moment it was printed, the veracity of Foxe's account of this horrible episode was challenged. The reader seeking to understand both this episode, and the context in which it occurred, can do no better than consult D. M. Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk: 1996), esp. pp. 55-83.

[Back to Top]

Foxe's basic account of this tragedy first appeared in the 1563 edition. It was based on the petition of Mathieu Cauches (the brother of Catherine Cauches) made to the privy council asking for the punishment of those who burned his sister and his nieces (see Cal. of State Papers Domestic Add. VI, p. 484). Someone on the privy council, probably William Cecil, supplied Foxe with a copy of this document.

[Back to Top]

In 1567, the catholic polemicist Thomas Harding printed a brief but stinging attack on Foxe's account of the incident, which accused Foxe of lying and the three women who were executed as being immoral criminals who received a deserved punishment (Thomas Harding, The Reiondre to Mr Jewels replie against the sacrifice of the Masse [Louvain: 1567], STC 12761, fos. 184r-185v).

[Back to Top]

In the 1570 edition, Foxe responded to this, first by adding additional documentation, which confirmed the accuracy of his first account. (It also enabled him to add the names of the martyred women and of Jacques Amy). Most of this documentation sprang from the successful efforts of Thomas Effart, a Guernsey jurat (one of twelve people who, under the baliff, formed Guernsey's royal court, which administered the internal affairs of the island) to secure a pardon for JacquesAmy and the other officials responsible for the burnings, and from the pardon itself. In response to Harding's claims that Massy was unmarried and her son illegitimate, Foxe obtained testimony from a Huguenot minister living in London who had conducted Massy's marriage. (This, by the way, is a good example of the ways in which catholic attacks on the first edition spurred Foxe on to greater research). Foxe then added a direct rebuttal of Harding's arguments.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaIuly. 18.AMong al and singular histories touched in this booke before, as there be many pitifull, diuers lamentable, some horryble & tragicall: so is there none almoste to bee compared 

Commentary  *  Close

This is a rare example of the language of a passage being less restrained in the 1570 edition than in the 1563 edition; this is another result of Foxe responding to Harding.

to thys cruell and furious facte of the homicide Papists, done in the Isle of Garnsey, as in this story here folowing is comprehended. The case is thus.

[Back to Top]
The
* VVVv.iii.