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372 [372]

Actes and Monumentes Of the Church

aduauncement of the church, he deferred it. So likewise haue they nowe doone, for they were not absent for any thing that they doubted of the conclusyōs, which they iudged most true and holy, whervnto also they will sticke euen vnto death, but because they would not be vnapt to the trety of peace, for which they came. And that which they haue not doone in their own person, they haue fulfilled by their seruauntes and houshold, whome altogether they commaunded to reuerence that sessyon. I would that I had beene then in the place of some great prelate, surely they shoulde not haue gon vnpunished, which thought to haue plaid bo pepe, for what dooth the declaration of þe truth hinder the intrety of peace? Or if it do hurt? Why is not he counted as great an offender, which consenteth to hym that declareth the truthe, as he which dothe declare it? MarginaliaThe princes ambassadors declare Eugenius an ennemye vnto the truth.What shall we nead any further testimony, for now the ambassadors of the princes, haue declared Eugenius to be an enemy vnto the truthe. But to passe ouer theese thinges, it is sufficiente that Eugenius wrote afterwarde vnto the king of Fraunce, that he dyd vnderstand the bishop of Turnoun to be become his ennemye.

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MarginaliaArelatensis commēdeth the ambassadoures.After that the bishop of Turnoun had made an end, Cardinal Arelatensis gaue thanckes vnto God, which had so defended his church. And after great stormes and cloudes, had sēt fair and clere weather, and commendinge the good wil of the Emperoure, and the kyng of Fraunce toward the churche, he also praysed the bishops of Lubeck and Turnoun, for that oftentimes in the councel. and also of late at Mentz, they had defended the autoritye of the councell. But speciallye he commended thys their present doinges, that they hadde openly confessed the truth, and hadde not sequestred them selues from the faith of the church. MarginaliaThe councell is congregate for thys purpose, that the ambition of the pope should be taken, away in þt he should not thynke he myght do all thynges according to hys own wil, and furder that their mynde should be reuoked from the care of temporall thinges vnto spirytual thynges whych now they regard not.

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Afterward, he entring into the declaratyon of the matter, saide that he was at Pysis and at Constance, and neuer saw a more quiet or deuout sessyon then this, affyrming that this decree was most necessary, to represse the ambition of the bishoppes of Rome, which exalting them selues aboue the vniuersal church, thought it lawful for them to do all thynges what they would. That no one manne from hence forth should transport the church from one place to another, as Eugenius attempted to doo. And that here after the byshoppes should withdraw their mindes from the carefulnes of temporall goodes, which as he hym selfe dyd see had no minde at all on spirytual matters. And therfore by how much this sessyon is moost holy and necessarye, By so muche the assent of the ambassadors was moost laudable and acceptable to all the fathers. These woordes thus spoken, he rose vp, and the cōgregation was dissolued. Now how the deposition of Eugenius did passe, the boke following shal declare at large.

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¶ Thus endeth the fyrst booke of
the Commentaries of Eneas Syluius,
touching the actes of the councell of
Basell, against Eugenius and
his adherentes.

The second Booke of the Commentaries of Eneas Syluius vpon the actes of the councell of Basel, faythfully translated into English. By Fabian Wythers.

THe Lord tooke vp his armor & shield, and rose vp to healpe the church, and she receiuing helpe being glad, reioysed in her God, which clothed her wyth the garmentes of saluation, and adorned her as a beutifull spowse, with the crown vowches and vesture of iustice. MarginaliaEugenius vexed the church, as a rede wyth the wynde.It is before declared in the former commentaries, in what state the church was in these our dais, which Eugenius a litle before being Pope, dyd vexe and trouble, as the winde doth a rede.

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Notwithstanding it is alwaies true, which Ihon Chrisostome hathe declared, that the Church dooth neuer cease to be impugned, & to be line in wayte for, but in the name of Christ, it hath alwaies the victory and vpper hand. And allbeit that some do lye in wait for it, and that the floudes doo strike againste it. Notwithstanding the foundatyon whyche is laid vpon the rocke neuer shaken. MarginaliaEugenius is deposed from the apostolyke sea.Wherefore iniquity hath deceiued Gabriell, and the Lord hath destroyed him in his malice, for he being throwne downe headlonge out of the Apostolike Sea, by the sentence of the councell, and the Lord is become the refuge of the Church, whiche hathe geuen a pastor vnto hys flocke, whiche wyll visyte the desolate places, seeke those thinges which are scattered abrode, and wyl not eat the flesh of suche as are fatte, but wil wisely and discreatly nourish that whych dooth stand and remain, which thing that all christians may the more plainly vnderstand, I wyl declare in this booke which foloweth, the order of the election, howe that Amodeus the most wise and discrete duke of Sebaudia, was chosen bishop of Rome.

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MarginaliaThe councel doothe delyberate vpon the popes electyon.Gabriell Condulmarius being deposed frō þe bishoprick of Rome, as we haue already declared, þe principall fathers of the councel being called together in the Chapter house of þe great churche, consulted together, whether it were expedient that a newe bishop shoulde be created oute of hande, or deferred for a time. 

Commentary  *  Close
Council of Basle [II]

In the 1563 edition, Foxe reprinted almost all of the second book of Aeneas Sylvius Picclomini's Commentaries on the Council of Basel, which describes the election of Amadeus, the duke of Savoy, as anti-pope Felix V by the Council. (Cf. Aeneas Sylvius Picclomini, De Gestis Concili Basiliensis Commentarium libri II, ed. Denys Hay and W. K. Smith, second edition, [Oxford, 1997], 189-255 with 1563, pp. 320-330). In the 1570, edition, simply to save space (and paper which was running short in this edition), Foxe made a series of cuts to this material. The editing was actually quite skillfully done; Foxe removed a considerable amount of extraneous detail - e.g., passages detailing the complicated system adopted for electing the anti-pope at Basel, the seating arrangements of the conclave and the ceremonial that took place - while preserving the substance of the theological and ecclesialogical debates.

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In the 1563 edition, Foxe also introduced a letter written by Cardinal Julian Caeserini, the papal legate in Germany to Eugenius IV, urging the pope not to dissolve the Council of Vienna. The letter was taken from Ortwin Gratius, Fasciculus rerum expetendarum ac fugiendarum (Cologne, 1535), fos. 32r-34r; Foxe's version is complete and accurate. In the same edition, Foxe also introduced a narrative of the summoning of the Hussites to the Council of Basel and of Cardinal Caeserini's oration to them. Although Foxe declares that this material came from Picclomini's Commentaries, it actually came from Picclomini's history of Bohemia. (Although Foxe definitely used the history elsewhere, in this case he was probably repeating the excerpt of it in Gratius' Fasciculus, fos. 156r-160r). Foxe continued to mine Gratius's collection by reprinting a petition from the Hussites to the Council of Basel (cf. Gratius, Fasciculus, fo. 180r-v). Significantly, Foxe did not reprint the response of the Council - whose members, because of their anti-papalism, Foxe was depicting as heroes - which defended communion in one kind and not having the Scriptures in the vernacular (see Gratius, Fasciculus, fos. 180v-181r). And a description of reforms enacted by the Council of Basel also came from Gratius (see Fasciculus, fos. 34v-35v). Ironically, one item, a letter from Martin Meyer to Picclomini, which Foxe states came from Gratius's Fasciculus, actually came from Matthias Flacius, Catalogus Testium Veritatis (Strasbourg, 1562), p. 318.

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In 1570, in addition to pruning the lengthy extract from Picclomini's Commentaries, Foxe also deleted the letter from Cardinal Caesarini to Eugenius IV. However, he added a laudatory description of Felix V, of the accession of Albert II and of the capture and rescue of the cardinal of Arles, from Conrad of Lichtenau, Abbatis Ursprengensis Chronici, ed. Caspar Hedio (Basel, 1569), pp. 392-3 and 397-8. Foxe also expanded the account of the Hussites and the Council of Basel with extracts from Johannes Cochlaeus, Historiae Hussitarum (Mainz, 1549), pp. 257-8, 260-2 and 267-71. The 1570 version was reprinted without change in the 1576 edition. The letter of Cardinal Caesarini, which had been deleted from the 1570 edition, was restored in 1583.

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Thomas S. Freeman
University of Sheffield

Such as thought good that the election shuld

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be