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Thematic Divisions in Book 5
1. Preface to Rubric 2. The Rubric 3. Mary's First Moves 4. The Inhibition5. Bourne's Sermon 6. The True Report7. The Precept to Bonner 8. Anno 15549. From 'The Communication' to 'A Monition' 10. Bonner's Monition11. Mary's Articles for Bonner 12. The Articles 13. From Mary's Proclamation to the 'Stile'14. From the 'Stile' to the 'Communication' 15. The 'Communication' 16. How Thomas Cranmer ... 17. Cranmer18. Ridley 19. Latimer20. Harpsfield's Forme 21. 1563's Disputational Digest22. Political Events up to Suffolk's Death 23. Between Mantell and the Preacher's Declaration 24. The Declaration of Bradford et al 25. May 19 to August 1 26. August 1 - September 3 27. From Bonner's Mandate to Pole's Oration 28. Winchester's Sermon to Bonner's Visitation 29. Pole's Oration 30. From the Supplication to Gardiner's Sermon 31. From Gardiner's Sermon to 1555 32. From the Arrest of Rose to Hooper's Letter 33. Hooper's Answer and Letter 34. To the End of Book X 35. The Martyrdom of Rogers 36. The Martyrdom of Saunders 37. Saunders' Letters 38. Hooper's Martyrdom 39. Hooper's Letters 40. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 41. Becket's Image and other events 42. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 43. Bonner and Reconciliation 44. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 45. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 46. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White47. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 48. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 49. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 50. Judge Hales 51. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 52. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 53. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 54. The Letters of George Marsh 55. The Martyrdom of William Flower 56. Mary's False Pregnancy57. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 58. John Tooly 59. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]60. Censorship Proclamation 61. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 62. Letters of Haukes 63. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 64. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain65. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 66. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 67. Bradford's Letters 68. William Minge 69. The Martyrdom of John Bland 70. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 71. Sheterden's Letters 72. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 73. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 74. John Aleworth 75. Martyrdom of James Abbes 76. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 77. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 78. Richard Hooke 79. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 80. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 81. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 82. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 83. Martyrdom of William Haile 84. Examination of John Newman 85. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 86. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 87. William Andrew 88. William Allen 89. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 90. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 91. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 92. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 93. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 94. John and William Glover 95. Cornelius Bungey 96. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 97. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 98. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 99. Ridley's Letters 100. Life of Hugh Latimer 101. Latimer's Letters 102. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed103. More Letters of Ridley 104. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 105. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 106. William Wiseman 107. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 108. John Went 109. Isobel Foster 110. Joan Lashford 111. Five Canterbury Martyrs 112. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 113. Letters of Cranmer 114. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 115. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 116. William Tyms, et al 117. The Norfolk Supplication 118. Letters of Tyms 119. John Hullier's Execution120. John Hullier 121. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 122. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 123. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 124. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 125. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 126. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 127. Thomas Rede128. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 129. William Slech 130. Avington Read, et al 131. Wood and Miles 132. Adherall and Clement 133. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 134. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow135. Persecution in Lichfield 136. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 137. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 138. John Careless 139. Letters of John Careless 140. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 141. Guernsey Martyrdoms 142. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 143. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 144. Three Men of Bristol145. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 146. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 147. John Horne and a woman 148. Northampton Shoemaker 149. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 150. More Persecution at Lichfield 151. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife152. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent153. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury154. The 'Bloody Commission'155. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester156. Five Burnt at Smithfield157. Stephen Gratwick and others158. Edmund Allen and other martyrs159. Edmund Allen160. Alice Benden and other martyrs161. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs162. Ambrose163. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper164. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs165. John Thurston166. Thomas More167. George Eagles168. Richard Crashfield169. Fryer and George Eagles' sister170. John Kurde171. Cicelye Ormes172. Joyce Lewes173. Rafe Allerton and others174. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston175. Persecution at Lichfield176. Persecution at Chichester177. Thomas Spurdance178. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson179. John Rough and Margaret Mearing180. Cuthbert Simson181. William Nicholl182. Seaman, Carman and Hudson183. Three at Colchester184. A Royal Proclamation185. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs186. Richard Yeoman187. John Alcocke188. Alcocke's Epistles189. Thomas Benbridge190. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs191. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver192. Three at Bury193. The Final Five Martyrs194. William Living195. The King's Brief196. William Browne197. Some Persecuted at Suffolk198. Elizabeth Lawson199. Edward Grew200. The Persecuted of Norfolk201. The Persecuted of Essex202. Thomas Bryce203. The Persecuted in Kent204. The Persecuted in Coventry and the Exiles205. Thomas Parkinson206. The Scourged: Introduction207. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax208. Thomas Greene209. Bartlett Greene and Cotton210. Steven Cotton's Letter211. Scourging of John Milles212. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw213. Robert Williams214. Bonner's Beating of Boys215. A Beggar of Salisbury216. John Fetty217. James Harris218. Providences: Introduction219. The Miraculously Preserved220. Christenmas and Wattes221. Simon Grinaeus222. John Glover223. Dabney224. Alexander Wimshurst225. Bosom's wife226. The Delivery of Moyse227. Lady Knevet228. Crosman's wife229. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk230. Congregation of London231. Robert Cole232. Englishmen at Calais233. John Hunt and Richard White234. Punishments of Persecutors235. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth236. The Westminster Conference237. Nicholas Burton238. Another Martyrdom in Spain239. Baker and Burgate240. Burges and Hoker241. Justice Nine-Holes242. Back to the Appendix notes243. A Poor Woman of Exeter244. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material245. Priest's Wife of Exeter246. Gertrude Crockhey
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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969 [91]

The fyrste entryng of Quene Mary to the crowne, wyth the beheadynge of the Duke of Northumberland, and other perturbations happening the same tyme in the Realme. 
Commentary  *  Close
Block 3: Mary's first moves

This is the first example of what will be a recurring pattern throughout Book 10 (and not typical of any other section of the Actes and Monuments) - extended theological discussion followed by bald political narrative. This section of narrative had a purpose: it emphasises Mary's 'perjury' to the protestants who supported her and it is as close as Foxe ever came to directly criticising her.

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The section of Book 10, from Edward VI's illness and Jane Grey's marriage to Mary's arrival in London, is based on Foxe's Rerum, pp. 232-34 (translated with varying degrees of fidelity). Essentially the sources for this section were reports from protestants in England during Mary's reign to English protestants in exile and continental reformers, which Foxe gathered while he was overseas. Some new material was added in later editions (notably Mary's letter to the Privy Council and the Council's response), but on the whole, there was little new information added to this section. Many of the remaining changes to the substance of this section (e.g., the accounts of Northumberland's death) reflect the changing circumstances in which Foxe's work was written.

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Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
Mary's First Moves

Political events predominate here. Foxe has to decide what titles to give the competing queens at crucial moments. The glosses 'Queene Iane proclamed at London' and 'Comparisō betweene young king Edward & young Lady Iane' may be examined: the first notes the proclaiming of 'Queene Iane' while the second, by pointing to a passage concerned with her upbringing and therefore using 'Lady Iane', allows the transition back to Lady Jane for the rest of the section (except for 'Bishop Ridley preacheth in Queene Maryes time' which recalls Ridley preaching in Queen Jane's time) without having to say anything explicit about legitimacy.

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Another interesting titular contrast comes at the gloss 'Breach of promise in Queene Mary': immediately before this is a gloss in all editions, 'The Lady Mary promiseth faithfully that she would not alter religion'. The contrast between 'Lady' and 'Queen' appears to suggest a willingness to promise anything to gain power followed by indifference to promises.

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Another contrast between Jane and Mary can be found in the glosses: while 'Two things feared in Queene Mary' points to two things feared from Mary, 'Comparisō betweene young king Edward & young Lady Iane' points to a favourable comparison between Jane and King Edward. Two glosses do not appear after 1563. Perhaps the reference to the king's will in the gloss 'Lady Iane made heire by þe kings will' was too sensitive a point with Elizabeth to risk retaining the gloss. Another to be removed was 'Tokēs that quene Mary wold not kepe touch with the Suffolke menne' which considers the executions of various protestant nobles as 'tokens' that Mary would not 'kepe touch with the Suffolke men': perhaps this was later removed as ceding too much to the popular will (the Northern Uprising of 1569 may have heightened Foxe's awareness of the sensitivity of rebellion). Foxe's glosses report but do not comment upon Northumberland's recantation ('The Duke of Northumberlād condemned to dye', 'The Duke of Northumberland reuoketh his religion' and 'The Duke of Northūberland beheaded',) although the juxtaposition of the confessions and deaths of two protestant gentlemen, 'Syr Iohn Gates and Sir Thomas Palmer confessing their fayth were beheaded', was perhaps designed to offer contrast.

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Marginalia1553. WHat tyme kyng Edward being now long diseased, began to appeare more feable and sycke, in the meane whyle durynge the tyme of this his syckenes, there was a certayne mariage prouided, concluded, and shortly also vpon the same solemnised, in the moneth of Maye, betwene the Lord Gilforde, sonne to the Duke of Northumberland, and the lady Iane the Duke of Suffolkes daughter, whose mother beyng thē alyue, was daughter to Mary, kyng Henryes seconde syster, who fyrste was maryed to the French kyng, and after to Charles Duke of Suffolke. But to make no longe tariaunce hereupon, the mariage beinge ended, and the kyng waxing euerye daye more sycke then other, where as in deede there seemed to bee no hope of recouerye, it was brought to passe by the consent not onely of the Nobility, but also by al the chief Lawyers of the realme, that the kyng by his testament dyd appoynt the aforesaid Lady Iane, daughter to the Duke of Suffolke, to be Inheretrice vnto the crowne of Englande, MarginaliaLady Iane made heire by þe kings will. passinge ouer hys two systers, Marye and Elizabeth. To this order subscribed al the kynges Counsell, and chiefe of the Nobility, the Maior and City of London, and almost all the Iudges and chiefe Lawiers of the Realme, sauing onelye Iustice Hales of Kent, a mon bothe fauouringe true religion, and also a Iudge: I saye as vpright a Iudge as anye was in thys realme, Marginalia standeth with Q. Mary.geuing his consent vnto Lady Marye, would in no case subscribe to Lady Iane. Of this man (God wyllyng) you shall perceyue more in the sequele of this story. The causes layd agaynst Ladye Mary, were as wel for that it was feared she would mary with a straunger, and therby entangle the crowne, as also that shee woulde cleane alter religion, vsed both in kyng Henry her father, and also in kynge Edwarde her brothers dayes, and so bryng in the Pope, to the vtter destruction of the realme, whyche in dede afterward came to passe, as by the course and sequele of thys storye maye wel appeare. Much probable matter they had thus to coniecture of her, by reason of her great stubbernes, which she shewed and declared in her brothers dayes, as in the letters before mencioned, passyng betwene her and kyng Edward, and the Counsell, maye appeare. Matters being thus concluded, and after confirmed by euery mans hand, kyng Edwarde an Impe of so great hope, not long after this departed by the vehemency of hys syckenes, at which time

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he was. xvi. yeares of age, wyth whom also decayed in maner þe whole flourishyng estate and honour of the Englysh nation. Therfore whē kyng Edward was dead, this Iane was established in the kyngdome by the Nobles consent, and was foorthwith published quene by proclamation at London, and in other Cities, where was anye great resorte, and was ther so taken and named. Betwene this yong Damosel and kyng Edwarde, there was lytle difference in age, though in learning and knowledge of the tounges she was not onely equall, but also superiour vnto him, being instructed of Maister Aelmer, a man notablye well lerned. If her fortune had bene as good as was her bringing vp, ioyned with trimnes of witte: vndoubtedly shee mighte haue bene compared not only to the house of the Aspasians, Sempronians, or mother of the Grachies, yea to any other women beside that deserued highe praise for their singuler learning: but also to the Vniuersity men, which haue taken many degres of the scholes. MarginaliaMary flieth to the commons. In the meane time while these things were adoing at Londō, Mary which had knowledge of her brothers death, maketh awaye secretelye, farre of from the City, hoping chieflye vpon the good wyl of the Commons, and yet (perchaūce) not destitute all together of the secrete aduertisements of some of the Nobles. When the Coūsell heard of her soddain departure, and perceiued her stoutnes, and that al cam not to passe as they supposed: they gathered spedelye a power of men together, appointed an army, and fyrst assigned that the Duke of Suffolk shuld take that enterprise in hande, and so haue the leading of the band. But afterward altrynge their myndes, they thought it best to sēd forth the Duke of Northumberland, wyth certayn other Lordes and Gentlemen.

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When al thinges thus were concluded, and that it myght be certayne that thys enterprise was not onely of the Dukes doing: he dyd nothing therin, but by warrant of the said Coūsail, hauing both his tymes and iourneys appointed, whiche order it was neither lawful, nor yet much for his ease to breake. Marye in the meane whyle, tossed with much trauel vp and downe, and nowe going the surest waye to worke, getteth her at last into þe quarters of Norfolk & Suffolk, wher she vnderstode that the Dukes name was had in much hatred for the seruice that he had done there vnder King Edward, in subduing the Rebels: & there gathering to her such ayde of the commons on euery side as she mighte, kepeth her selfe cloase for a space within Freminghā castle: to whō first of all the Suffolke men came, that alwaies haue bene men forward in promoting the procedinges of the gospel, promisinge her their ayde and helpe herin, so that shee would not attempte the alteration of the religion,

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which
MMm.i.