Navigate the 1563 Edition
PrefaceBook 1Book 2Book 3Book 4Book 5
Thematic Divisions in Book 5
1. Preface to Rubric 2. The Rubric 3. Mary's First Moves 4. The Inhibition5. Bourne's Sermon 6. The True Report7. The Precept to Bonner 8. Anno 15549. From 'The Communication' to 'A Monition' 10. Bonner's Monition11. Mary's Articles for Bonner 12. The Articles 13. From Mary's Proclamation to the 'Stile'14. From the 'Stile' to the 'Communication' 15. The 'Communication' 16. How Thomas Cranmer ... 17. Cranmer18. Ridley 19. Latimer20. Harpsfield's Forme 21. 1563's Disputational Digest22. Political Events up to Suffolk's Death 23. Between Mantell and the Preacher's Declaration 24. The Declaration of Bradford et al 25. May 19 to August 1 26. August 1 - September 3 27. From Bonner's Mandate to Pole's Oration 28. Winchester's Sermon to Bonner's Visitation 29. Pole's Oration 30. From the Supplication to Gardiner's Sermon 31. From Gardiner's Sermon to 1555 32. From the Arrest of Rose to Hooper's Letter 33. Hooper's Answer and Letter 34. To the End of Book X 35. The Martyrdom of Rogers 36. The Martyrdom of Saunders 37. Saunders' Letters 38. Hooper's Martyrdom 39. Hooper's Letters 40. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 41. Becket's Image and other events 42. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 43. Bonner and Reconciliation 44. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 45. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 46. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White47. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 48. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 49. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 50. Judge Hales 51. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 52. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 53. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 54. The Letters of George Marsh 55. The Martyrdom of William Flower 56. Mary's False Pregnancy57. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 58. John Tooly 59. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]60. Censorship Proclamation 61. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 62. Letters of Haukes 63. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 64. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain65. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 66. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 67. Bradford's Letters 68. William Minge 69. The Martyrdom of John Bland 70. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 71. Sheterden's Letters 72. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 73. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 74. John Aleworth 75. Martyrdom of James Abbes 76. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 77. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 78. Richard Hooke 79. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 80. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 81. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 82. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 83. Martyrdom of William Haile 84. Examination of John Newman 85. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 86. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 87. William Andrew 88. William Allen 89. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 90. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 91. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 92. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 93. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 94. John and William Glover 95. Cornelius Bungey 96. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 97. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 98. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 99. Ridley's Letters 100. Life of Hugh Latimer 101. Latimer's Letters 102. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed103. More Letters of Ridley 104. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 105. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 106. William Wiseman 107. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 108. John Went 109. Isobel Foster 110. Joan Lashford 111. Five Canterbury Martyrs 112. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 113. Letters of Cranmer 114. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 115. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 116. William Tyms, et al 117. The Norfolk Supplication 118. Letters of Tyms 119. John Hullier's Execution120. John Hullier 121. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 122. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 123. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 124. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 125. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 126. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 127. Thomas Rede128. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 129. William Slech 130. Avington Read, et al 131. Wood and Miles 132. Adherall and Clement 133. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 134. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow135. Persecution in Lichfield 136. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 137. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 138. John Careless 139. Letters of John Careless 140. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 141. Guernsey Martyrdoms 142. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 143. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 144. Three Men of Bristol145. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 146. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 147. John Horne and a woman 148. Northampton Shoemaker 149. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 150. More Persecution at Lichfield 151. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife152. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent153. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury154. The 'Bloody Commission'155. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester156. Five Burnt at Smithfield157. Stephen Gratwick and others158. Edmund Allen and other martyrs159. Edmund Allen160. Alice Benden and other martyrs161. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs162. Ambrose163. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper164. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs165. John Thurston166. Thomas More167. George Eagles168. Richard Crashfield169. Fryer and George Eagles' sister170. John Kurde171. Cicelye Ormes172. Joyce Lewes173. Rafe Allerton and others174. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston175. Persecution at Lichfield176. Persecution at Chichester177. Thomas Spurdance178. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson179. John Rough and Margaret Mearing180. Cuthbert Simson181. William Nicholl182. Seaman, Carman and Hudson183. Three at Colchester184. A Royal Proclamation185. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs186. Richard Yeoman187. John Alcocke188. Alcocke's Epistles189. Thomas Benbridge190. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs191. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver192. Three at Bury193. The Final Five Martyrs194. William Living195. The King's Brief196. William Browne197. Some Persecuted at Suffolk198. Elizabeth Lawson199. Edward Grew200. The Persecuted of Norfolk201. The Persecuted of Essex202. Thomas Bryce203. The Persecuted in Kent204. The Persecuted in Coventry and the Exiles205. Thomas Parkinson206. The Scourged: Introduction207. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax208. Thomas Greene209. Bartlett Greene and Cotton210. Steven Cotton's Letter211. Scourging of John Milles212. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw213. Robert Williams214. Bonner's Beating of Boys215. A Beggar of Salisbury216. John Fetty217. James Harris218. Providences: Introduction219. The Miraculously Preserved220. Christenmas and Wattes221. Simon Grinaeus222. John Glover223. Dabney224. Alexander Wimshurst225. Bosom's wife226. The Delivery of Moyse227. Lady Knevet228. Crosman's wife229. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk230. Congregation of London231. Robert Cole232. Englishmen at Calais233. John Hunt and Richard White234. Punishments of Persecutors235. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth236. The Westminster Conference237. Nicholas Burton238. Another Martyrdom in Spain239. Baker and Burgate240. Burges and Hoker241. Justice Nine-Holes242. Back to the Appendix notes243. A Poor Woman of Exeter244. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material245. Priest's Wife of Exeter246. Gertrude Crockhey
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the GlossesCommentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
984 [916]

Actes and Monumentes of the church

The churche of Christ was before any scripture written. For Mathew was the fyrst that wrote the gospell, about a dosein yeares after Christe: ergo the churche was before the Scripture. To whome Philpot aunsweryng, denied his argument. Which whan Moreman could not proue, Philpot shewed that his argumēt was (Elēchus) or a fallace, that is a deceiuable argument. For he tooke the scripture onely to be that whiche is written by men in letters, where as in very dede all prophecy vttered by the spirit of God, was counted to be scripture before it was written in paper and inke, for that it was written in the heartes, and grauen in the myndes: yea, and inspired in the mouthes of good men, and of Christes Apostles, by the spirite of Christ: As the salutation of the Aungell was the scripture of Christ, and the woorde of God, before it was written. At that Moreman cryed, fye, fye: wondring that the scripture of God should be coūted scripture, before it was written, and affyrmed that he had no knowledge, that so sayde. To whō Philpot answered, that concerning knowledge in this behalf, for þe trial of the truth about the questions in controuersie, he would wyshe hymselfe no worse matched, than with Moreman. At the whiche saying, the Prolocutor was greuously offended, saying that it was arrogātly spokē of him, that would compare with such a worshipfull learned man, as Moreman was, being himself a man vnlearned, yea a madman, meter to be sent to Bedlem, than to be amonge suche a sorte of learned and graue men, as there were, and a man that neuer would be aunswered, and that troubled the whole house: & therfore he dyd commaund him that he should come no more into the house, demanding of the house whether they woulde agree thereuppon or no. To whom a great number answered, yea. Thā saide Philpot againe, that he might think hymself happy, that was out of that company. After this Morgan rose vp and rounded the Prolocutor in the eare. And than agayne the Prolocutor spake to Philpot and saide, lest you shoulde slaūder the house, and say that we wyll not suffer you to declare your minde, we are contente, you shal come into the house, as you haue done before, so that you bee apparelled with a longe gowne and a tippet, as we be and that you shal not speake, but when I commaunde you. Than quod Philpot, I had rather be absēt altogether. Thus thei reasoning to and fro, at length about the. 13. of December, Quene Mary, to ake vp the matter, sendeth her commandement to Boner Bishop of London, that he should dissolue and breake vp the conuocation: The copye of which commaundement here foloweth.

[Back to Top]
¶ The precept of the Quene to Boner B. of London, for the dissoluynge of the foresayde Conuocation. 
Commentary  *  Close
Block 7: Bonner's Precept and the end of 1553

Generally, if Foxe quotes a document in the 1563 edition which pertains to the London diocese, it came from the London diocesan records, one of the few archival collections which Foxe systematically exploited before the 1563 edition. Mary's precept to Bonner to dissolve Convocation probably came from these records.

[Back to Top]

MAria. &c. Reuerendo in Christo patri & domino, domino Edmūdo London. Episcopo, salutem. Cū præsens conuocatio cleri Cātuariensis prouinciæ, apud Sanctū Paulū London. iā modo tenta & instans existit, certis tamen vrgentibus causis & considerationibus nos specialiter mouentibus, de aduisamento concilij nostri ipsam præsentem conuocationē duximus dissoluendam. Et ideo vobis mandamus quod eandem præsentem conuocationem apud Sanc-

[Back to Top]

tum Paulum prædictum debito modo absque aliqua dilatione dissoluatis, dißoluiue faciatis prout cōuenit significantes ex parte nostra vniuersis & singulis episcopis, necnon Archidiaconis, Decanis, & omnibus alijs personis ecclesiasticis quibuscunque, dictæ Cantuariensis prouinciæ, quorum interest vel intereße poterit, quod ipsi & eorum quilibet huic mandato nostro exequendo intendentes sint & obedientes prout decet. Teste meipsa apud Westmonasteriū. 13. die Decembris, Anno regni nostri primo.  

Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
The Precept to Bonner

The wording and close linking of reform to the queen can be seen in the glosses 'Good Byshops displaced' and 'Popish Prelates intruded by Q. Mary'. These are contrasting glosses: the 'displaced' (a word which suggests fault if not illegality) good bishops and the 'intruded' (roughness of dealing, but, again, no illegality suggested by this term) popish prelates.

[Back to Top]

[Back to Top] Marginalia Nouēber.

In Nouember the Archebishop Cranmer, (notwithstanding he had earnestly refused to subscribe to the kynges wyll:, in disheritynge his Sister Mary, alleging many and pithy reasons for her legitimation) was in the Guylde hall of London, arraygned and attaynted of high Treason, with the Lady Iane, and three of the Duke of Northumberlandes Sonnes, which al at the entreatie of certain persōs wer had againe to the Tower. 

Commentary  *  Close

The description of the arraignment of Cranmer, Jane Grey and Northumberland's sons is taken from Crowley's chronicle (cf. Crowley, Epitome, sig. Ffff2v with 1563, p. 916; 1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; 1583, p. 1418) except for the passage which reads: 'which at the intreatye of certayne persons were had againe to the Tower and there kept for a time'. This passage is excerpted from Thomas Cooper, Coopers chronicle ... vnto the late death of Quene Marie (London, 1560), STC 15218, sig. Yyyy2r. This is Foxe's only borrowing from Coopers chronicle in Book 10 (or, as far as is known, anywhere in the Actes and Monuments).

[Back to Top]

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaCardinall Poole sent for.In this meane whyle Cardinal Poole being sent for by Quene Mary, was by the Emperor requested to stay with him, to thintent (as som thinke) that his presence in Englād should not be a let to the mariage, which he entended betwene Philip his sonne & Quene Mary: for þe making wherof, he sent a most ample Ambassade, with full power to make vp the mariage betwixt them: MarginaliaMaryage betwixte Philip and Mary concluded.which toke such successe, that after they had commoned of the matter a fewe dayes, they knitte vp the knot. 

Commentary  *  Close

The detaining of Pole by the emperor and the coming of an embassy sent to arrange the marriage of Philip and Mary are recounted by Crowley and reprinted by Foxe (cf. Crowley, Epitome, sig. Ffff2v with 1563, p. 916; 1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; 1583, p. 1418).

[Back to Top]

Marginalia1554.  

Commentary  *  Close
Block 8: Anno 1554

Much of the material in this section is reprinted from Crowley's chronicle. Later in Book 10, after the Oxford disputations, Foxe would draw on yet another chronicle or chronicles to form a political narrative of the early years of Mary's reign. Because he was drawing on different sources which covered roughly the same chronological period, there was a good deal of repetition (and a certain amount of inconsistency) between these different sections of Book 10. For example, Foxe gave one account of the capture of the Duke of Suffolk here (1563, p. 916; 1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; and 1583, p. 1418) and another, different, account of the same events later in Book 10 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1396; and 1583, p. 1467). Foxe made no attempt, at any time, to reconcile any of these differing versions of the same events.

[Back to Top]
This was done aboute the beginning of Ianuarie, and was verye euill taken of the people, and of many of the Nobilitie: who for this and for religion, conspiring among thēselues, made a rebellion, whereof sir Thomas Wyat knight was one of the chief beginners: who being in Kēt, said, as many els perceiued, that þe Quene and the counsell would by foreine mariages bring vpon this realme most miserable seruitude, and establish popish religion. Aboute  
Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
Anno 1554

Foxe seems to have been especially concerned to defend the Wyatt rebels against Mary's account of their intentions ('Demaundes pretended to be sent from M. Wyat and hys company to Queene Mary' and 'How he pretended the spoyle of theyr goodes it appeareth in that he comming to Southwarke, did hurt neither man, woman, nor childe, neyther in body nor in a penny of their goodes'). The later dropping of the gloss 'Duke of Suffolke forsooke Quene Mary' (1563) is a possible example of Foxe striving to discredit Mary without explicitly speaking against her.

[Back to Top]
MarginaliaIanuary. 25.the. 25. of Ianuary, newes came to London of this sturre in Kent, and shortly after of the. MarginaliaDuke of Suffolke forsooke Quene Mary. D. of Suffolk, who was fled into Warwickshire and Leicestershire, there to gather a power. The Quene therfore caused them bothe wyth the two Carewes of Deuonshyre to be proclamed Traitors: and sente into Kente againste Wyat, Thomas Duke of Northfolke, who beinge aboute Rochester bridge, forsaken of them that wēt with hym, returned safe again to Londō, without any harme done vnto him, and without bloudshed of either partye. 
Commentary  *  Close

It might be noted here that in the Appendix of 1563 (p. 1731), Foxe prints a letter from Mary to the third Duke of Norfolk, informing the Duke of Wyatt's defeat. (This letter was removed from the editions of 1570 and 1576, but was reprinted in the 1583 edition). This letter was almost certainly loaned or given to Foxe by the fourth Duke of Norfolk.

[Back to Top]

The brief description of Wyatt's rebellion, Suffolk's capture and the flight of Sir Peter Carew are all taken from Crowley (cf. Crowley, Epitome, sigs. Ffff2v - Ffff3 with 1563, pp. 916-17; 1570, pp. 1579-80; 1576, pp. 1347-48; 1583, p. 1419).

There is one interesting piece of re-writing here, however. Crowley described the fate of the Duke of Norfolk's expedition against Wyatt: 'Thomas Duke of Norfolk, who beynge forsaken of them that went with hym, escaped to London agayne with great difficultie, as he thought, although no man followed him' (cf. Crowley, Epitome, sig. Ffff2v). Foxe, apparently thinking that this made the Duke of Norfolk sound too much like the Duke of Plaza Toro, rendered this: 'Thomas D. of Norfolke, who being aboute Rochester Bridge, forsaken of them that went with him, returned safe to London with out any more harme done unto him, and withoute bloudshed on either partie' (1563, p. 916; 1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; and 1583, p. 1418). Once again Foxe's loyalty to the Howard family shaped his narrative.

[Back to Top]
After the Duke of Suffolke was sent the Earle of Huntington in Post, who entryng the citie of Couentrye before the Duke, dysappoynted hym of hys purpose. Wherefore the Duke in great distresse commytted himselfe to the kepyng of a seruaunte 
Commentary  *  Close

While Foxe reprinted the account of Suffolk's capture directly from Crowley, in the 1570 edition, he added one detail not in Crowley's account: that the name of the servant who betrayed the duke was Underwood.

of his owne in a Parke, who lyke a false Traytour bewrayed hym. MarginaliaDuke of Suffolke apprehēded. And so he was broughte vp to the Tower of London.

[Back to Top]

In