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Thematic Divisions in Book 5
1. Preface to Rubric 2. The Rubric 3. Mary's First Moves 4. The Inhibition5. Bourne's Sermon 6. The True Report7. The Precept to Bonner 8. Anno 15549. From 'The Communication' to 'A Monition' 10. Bonner's Monition11. Mary's Articles for Bonner 12. The Articles 13. From Mary's Proclamation to the 'Stile'14. From the 'Stile' to the 'Communication' 15. The 'Communication' 16. How Thomas Cranmer ... 17. Cranmer18. Ridley 19. Latimer20. Harpsfield's Forme 21. 1563's Disputational Digest22. Political Events up to Suffolk's Death 23. Between Mantell and the Preacher's Declaration 24. The Declaration of Bradford et al 25. May 19 to August 1 26. August 1 - September 3 27. From Bonner's Mandate to Pole's Oration 28. Winchester's Sermon to Bonner's Visitation 29. Pole's Oration 30. From the Supplication to Gardiner's Sermon 31. From Gardiner's Sermon to 1555 32. From the Arrest of Rose to Hooper's Letter 33. Hooper's Answer and Letter 34. To the End of Book X 35. The Martyrdom of Rogers 36. The Martyrdom of Saunders 37. Saunders' Letters 38. Hooper's Martyrdom 39. Hooper's Letters 40. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 41. Becket's Image and other events 42. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 43. Bonner and Reconciliation 44. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 45. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 46. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White47. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 48. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 49. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 50. Judge Hales 51. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 52. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 53. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 54. The Letters of George Marsh 55. The Martyrdom of William Flower 56. Mary's False Pregnancy57. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 58. John Tooly 59. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]60. Censorship Proclamation 61. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 62. Letters of Haukes 63. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 64. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain65. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 66. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 67. Bradford's Letters 68. William Minge 69. The Martyrdom of John Bland 70. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 71. Sheterden's Letters 72. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 73. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 74. John Aleworth 75. Martyrdom of James Abbes 76. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 77. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 78. Richard Hooke 79. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 80. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 81. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 82. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 83. Martyrdom of William Haile 84. Examination of John Newman 85. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 86. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 87. William Andrew 88. William Allen 89. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 90. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 91. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 92. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 93. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 94. John and William Glover 95. Cornelius Bungey 96. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 97. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 98. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 99. Ridley's Letters 100. Life of Hugh Latimer 101. Latimer's Letters 102. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed103. More Letters of Ridley 104. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 105. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 106. William Wiseman 107. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 108. John Went 109. Isobel Foster 110. Joan Lashford 111. Five Canterbury Martyrs 112. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 113. Letters of Cranmer 114. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 115. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 116. William Tyms, et al 117. The Norfolk Supplication 118. Letters of Tyms 119. John Hullier's Execution120. John Hullier 121. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 122. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 123. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 124. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 125. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 126. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 127. Thomas Rede128. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 129. William Slech 130. Avington Read, et al 131. Wood and Miles 132. Adherall and Clement 133. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 134. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow135. Persecution in Lichfield 136. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 137. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 138. John Careless 139. Letters of John Careless 140. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 141. Guernsey Martyrdoms 142. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 143. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 144. Three Men of Bristol145. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 146. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 147. John Horne and a woman 148. Northampton Shoemaker 149. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 150. More Persecution at Lichfield 151. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife152. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent153. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury154. The 'Bloody Commission'155. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester156. Five Burnt at Smithfield157. Stephen Gratwick and others158. Edmund Allen and other martyrs159. Edmund Allen160. Alice Benden and other martyrs161. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs162. Ambrose163. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper164. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs165. John Thurston166. Thomas More167. George Eagles168. Richard Crashfield169. Fryer and George Eagles' sister170. John Kurde171. Cicelye Ormes172. Joyce Lewes173. Rafe Allerton and others174. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston175. Persecution at Lichfield176. Persecution at Chichester177. Thomas Spurdance178. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson179. John Rough and Margaret Mearing180. Cuthbert Simson181. William Nicholl182. Seaman, Carman and Hudson183. Three at Colchester184. A Royal Proclamation185. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs186. Richard Yeoman187. John Alcocke188. Alcocke's Epistles189. Thomas Benbridge190. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs191. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver192. Three at Bury193. The Final Five Martyrs194. William Living195. The King's Brief196. William Browne197. Some Persecuted at Suffolk198. Elizabeth Lawson199. Edward Grew200. The Persecuted of Norfolk201. The Persecuted of Essex202. Thomas Bryce203. The Persecuted in Kent204. The Persecuted in Coventry and the Exiles205. Thomas Parkinson206. The Scourged: Introduction207. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax208. Thomas Greene209. Bartlett Greene and Cotton210. Steven Cotton's Letter211. Scourging of John Milles212. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw213. Robert Williams214. Bonner's Beating of Boys215. A Beggar of Salisbury216. John Fetty217. James Harris218. Providences: Introduction219. The Miraculously Preserved220. Christenmas and Wattes221. Simon Grinaeus222. John Glover223. Dabney224. Alexander Wimshurst225. Bosom's wife226. The Delivery of Moyse227. Lady Knevet228. Crosman's wife229. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk230. Congregation of London231. Robert Cole232. Englishmen at Calais233. John Hunt and Richard White234. Punishments of Persecutors235. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth236. The Westminster Conference237. Nicholas Burton238. Another Martyrdom in Spain239. Baker and Burgate240. Burges and Hoker241. Justice Nine-Holes242. Back to the Appendix notes243. A Poor Woman of Exeter244. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material245. Priest's Wife of Exeter246. Gertrude Crockhey
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995 [927]

dours, as be liegers here from the Princes and states ioyned in leage with her grace, shal with in. xxiiii. daies after this proclamation auoyde the realme, vpon payne of most greuous punishment by enprisonment, and forfeyture and confiscation of all their goods and moueables and also to be deliuered vnto theyr naturall Princes or Rulers, agaynst whose persons or lawes they haue offended. Giuing to all Maiours, Shiriffes, Bayliffes, Constables, and all other her ministers, officers, and good Subiectes streightly also in charge, if they knowe any such person not borne in the Quenes highnes dominiōs (except before excepted) that shal after the tyme and daye limitted in this Proclamation, tary within this realme, that they shall apprehende the same person or persons, & committe hym or them to warde, there to remayne without bayle or mayneprise, til her graces pleasure or her Counsayles be signified vnto them, for the further ordering of the sayde person or persones. And that, if any of her sayd officers, after the sayd, xxiiii dayes, apprehend, take, or knowe of any such, that they shal with diligence immediatly certify her sayd counsayll therof, to thintent ordre may furthwith be giuen for theyr punishment according. 

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Foxe's description of the diaspora of religious exiles from England was copied in the 1563 edition from Crowley's chronicle (cf. Crowley, Epitome, sig. Ffff3v with 1563, p. 927) (This was the last borrowing Foxe made from Crowley's chronicle in Book 10). Foxe added details to it in subsequent editions (see textual variant 30).

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IN the meane whyle, vpon the proclamation before mencioned, not onely the straungers in king Edwardes tyme, receaued into the realme for religion, (among whome was Peter Martyr, Iohannes Alasco Vncle to the king of Poland) 

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The identification of John Alasco (i.e., John a Lasco or, more properly, Jan Łaski) as the king of Poland's uncle is Crowley's mistake; Laski's nephew was the chancellor of Poland.

but many Englysh men also fled, some to Friselād, some to Cleueland, 
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'Cleveland' is the duchy of Cleves.

some to high Germanie, where they wer diuersly scattered into diuers companies, and congregations, at Wesell, at Frankford, Markpurgh, Strausbrough, Basil, Arow, Zurich, Geneua, and other places, where,  
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From Mary's Proclamation to the 'Stile'

An interesting difference occurs between 1563 and later editions over the English exiles, with 1563 emphasising divine providence and the later editions being more factual and neutral ('The great care & prouidence of God for his people' (1563); 'Englishmen fled out of the realm for religion' and 'The number of English exiles well neare 800. persons' (later editions)). Many of the glosses point to twists in the attempt by Gardiner and others to implicate Elizabeth in the Wyatt rebellion ('Lady Elizabeth and Lord Courtney vpon suspicion of Syr Thom. Wyats rising committed to the Tower', 'A poynt of practise of Ste. Gardiner agaynst the Lady Elizabeth', 'D. Weston against the Lady Elizabeth'); others imply the untruthfulness of Elizabeth's enemies, who were prone to tell 'tales' in the star chamber ('Cut prentise in Londō bronght before Ste. Gardiner', 'Ste. Gardiners tale in the starre chamber agaynst the Lady Elizabeth', 'The Lord Shandoys false report in the starre chamber, agaynst Lady Elizabeth and Lord Courtney'). The Lord Mayor's disdain for Weston is pointed to ('The Lord Mayors iudgement of D. Weston'): this was perhaps part of a wider attempt to encourage the hostility of London to Mary's reforms and reign. The approval by parliament of the queen's marriage is played down as the 'mention' of it ('Mention of the Quenes mariage in the Parlament'), perhaps reflecting Foxe's sensitivity about the complicity of parliament in Mary's reign.

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MarginaliaThe great care & prouidence of God for his people. by the prouidence of god they were all susteined, and there enterteined with greater fauour among straungers abroad, then they could be in their owne country at home. 
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Foxe's description of the diaspora of religious exiles from England was copied in the 1563 edition from Crowley's chronicle (cf. Crowley, Epitome, sig. Ffff3v with 1563, p. 927) (This was the last borrowing Foxe made from Crowley's chronicle in Book 10). Foxe added details to it in subsequent editions (see textual variant 30).

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MarginaliaMarche. 15.JN the sayd moneth of March, the Lord Courtney Erle of Deuonshire, whom the Quene at her fyrst entring delyuered out of the Tower, and Lady Elisabeth also, the Quenes sister, were both in suspection to haue consented to Wiates conspiracy, & for the same this March were apprehended, and committed to the Tower.

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NOt long after, Quene Mary, partly fearinge the Londoners, by occasion of Wiates conspiracy, partly perceuaing moste part of the Citie for religions sake not greatly to fauour her procedinges, to their displeasure & hinderaunce, sommoned a parliament to be holden at Oxforde: as it were to gratify that City, where, both the vniuersity, Towne, and Country, had shewed them selues very obedient and forward, especially in restoring olde religion. 

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In the first edition, Foxe declared that Oxford had been forward in restoring the 'olde religion'. (1563, p. 927). In later editions, this was changed to 'popish religion' (1570, p. 1588; 1576, p. 1355; 1583, p. 1426), probably in an effort to avoid conceding the superior antiquity of catholicism.

For this purpose greate prouision was made, as well by the quenes officers, as by the Townes men and inhabitantes of Oxford, and the countrye about.

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But the Queenes mind in short space chaunged, and the same parliament was holden at Westminster in Aprill followyng. Then the quene, beside other things, proposed cōcerning her mariage to kyng Phylippe, and restoryng of the Popes supremacie. As touchynge her mariage, it was agreed vpon: but the other request could not as then be obtayned.

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The same tyme when this parliament was summoned, she also summoned a conuocation of Byshops and of the Clergie, wryting vnto Bonner ( 

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From 'The Stile' to 'The Communication'

There are two aspects to be noted: the change in Mary's style (all editions) and Bonner's praise of priests. The softening of the sarcasm against Bonner after 1563 can be seen by comparing the glosses 'Hyghe reasons of Bōner why the order of priestes is to be honored aboue Angels and kinges' (1563) and 'The profound exhortation of B. Boner in the Conuocation' (later editions); perhaps this was linked in with the sharpening of the criticism against him because of his ill temper and base appetites which appear in later passages: this case does not provide the opportunity for that type of criticism.

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MarginaliaBoner made vicegerent and president of the conuocation.whome she had made Viceregent in the stede of Cranmer being in the Tower) after the tenor and forme of these wordes.

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¶ The Quenes brief or wrytte geuen out to Bonner for the summoning of a conuocation.

MAria dei gratia Angliæ, Franciæ, Hiberniæ Regina, fidei defensor, Reuerendo in Christo patri Edmundo London. Episco. Salutem. Licet nuper quibusdam arduis et vrgentibus negotijs nos, securitatem, et defensionem ecclesiæ Anglicanæ, ac pacē et tranquillitatem bonū publicum & defensionem Regni nostri, & subditorū nostrorum concernentibus, vobis in fide et dilectione, quibus nobis tenemini rogando mandarissemus etc.

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MarginaliaSupremum caput in the quenes style taken away.☞ Where note (good Reader) concerning the alteryng and chaunging the Quenes style, the later parte hereof to be left out of her tytle, whiche is, Ecclesiæ anglicanæ et Hiberniæ supremum caput, because in the parliament last past, the supremacie being geuen away from the crowne of Englande, to the Pope, there vpon this parcell of the title was also taken away: MarginaliaLegitime suffultus in the bishops title taken away.lykewyse the sayd Bonner geuing his certificat vpon the same, leaueth out: autoritate illustrissimæ &c. legitime suffulcitus: whiche parcell also in the sayde parliament was repriued and taken away the same tyme. 

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Block 15: Mary's title altered and Bonner's praise of priesthood

Foxe added a passage in the 1570 edition that emphasised that the title of Supreme Head of the English Church had been used by Henry VIII and Edward VI (textual variant 32). The order summoning Convocation, of which Foxe prints a few lines in order to demonstrate Mary's abandoning the title of Supreme Head, is in Bonner's register (Guildhall MS 9531/12, fol. 337v; cf. 1563, p. 927; 1570, p. 1588; 1576, p. 1355; 1583, p. 1426).

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IN this foresayde conuocation, Bonner B. of Londō beyng Viceregent, & President, as is sayde, made a certayne exhortation or oration to the Clergie, (whether it was in this conuocation, or muche about the sayde tyme) wherein he seameth to shewe a great piece of his profound and deape learninge, in settinge forth the moste incomparable and superangelical order of priesthod, as may appeare by this parcell or fragment of his forsayd oration, beyng collected and gathered by some that stode by: which, as it came to our hāds, so I thought to imparte it to the reader, both for that the autor of so worthy a worke should not passe vnknowē, and partly also, for that the estimatiō of this blessed order, whiche so piteously nowe is troden vnder fote, should lose nothing of his preeminence, but might be knowen in mooste ample perfection, so as it standeth aboue Angels & kinges, if it be true, that Bonner saith.

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¶ A piece or fragment of the exhortatiō made by Bonner byshop of London, to them of the conuocation house, copied out by them that stode by and harde him. 
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Foxe states that his extract from Bonner's oration to the Convocation of 1554, was based on the notes of those who heard it (1563, p. 927; 1570, p. 1588; 1576, p. 1355; 1583, p. 1426). A number of speeches and sermons which Foxe prints in Book 10 are based on the notes taken by those in attendance and later given to Foxe.

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The
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