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Thematic Divisions in Book 5
1. Preface to Rubric 2. The Rubric 3. Mary's First Moves 4. The Inhibition5. Bourne's Sermon 6. The True Report7. The Precept to Bonner 8. Anno 15549. From 'The Communication' to 'A Monition' 10. Bonner's Monition11. Mary's Articles for Bonner 12. The Articles 13. From Mary's Proclamation to the 'Stile'14. From the 'Stile' to the 'Communication' 15. The 'Communication' 16. How Thomas Cranmer ... 17. Cranmer18. Ridley 19. Latimer20. Harpsfield's Forme 21. 1563's Disputational Digest22. Political Events up to Suffolk's Death 23. Between Mantell and the Preacher's Declaration 24. The Declaration of Bradford et al 25. May 19 to August 1 26. August 1 - September 3 27. From Bonner's Mandate to Pole's Oration 28. Winchester's Sermon to Bonner's Visitation 29. Pole's Oration 30. From the Supplication to Gardiner's Sermon 31. From Gardiner's Sermon to 1555 32. From the Arrest of Rose to Hooper's Letter 33. Hooper's Answer and Letter 34. To the End of Book X 35. The Martyrdom of Rogers 36. The Martyrdom of Saunders 37. Saunders' Letters 38. Hooper's Martyrdom 39. Hooper's Letters 40. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 41. Becket's Image and other events 42. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 43. Bonner and Reconciliation 44. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 45. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 46. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White47. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 48. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 49. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 50. Judge Hales 51. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 52. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 53. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 54. The Letters of George Marsh 55. The Martyrdom of William Flower 56. Mary's False Pregnancy57. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 58. John Tooly 59. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]60. Censorship Proclamation 61. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 62. Letters of Haukes 63. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 64. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain65. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 66. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 67. Bradford's Letters 68. William Minge 69. The Martyrdom of John Bland 70. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 71. Sheterden's Letters 72. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 73. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 74. John Aleworth 75. Martyrdom of James Abbes 76. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 77. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 78. Richard Hooke 79. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 80. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 81. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 82. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 83. Martyrdom of William Haile 84. Examination of John Newman 85. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 86. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 87. William Andrew 88. William Allen 89. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 90. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 91. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 92. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 93. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 94. John and William Glover 95. Cornelius Bungey 96. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 97. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 98. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 99. Ridley's Letters 100. Life of Hugh Latimer 101. Latimer's Letters 102. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed103. More Letters of Ridley 104. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 105. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 106. William Wiseman 107. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 108. John Went 109. Isobel Foster 110. Joan Lashford 111. Five Canterbury Martyrs 112. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 113. Letters of Cranmer 114. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 115. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 116. William Tyms, et al 117. The Norfolk Supplication 118. Letters of Tyms 119. John Hullier's Execution120. John Hullier 121. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 122. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 123. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 124. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 125. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 126. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 127. Thomas Rede128. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 129. William Slech 130. Avington Read, et al 131. Wood and Miles 132. Adherall and Clement 133. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 134. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow135. Persecution in Lichfield 136. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 137. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 138. John Careless 139. Letters of John Careless 140. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 141. Guernsey Martyrdoms 142. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 143. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 144. Three Men of Bristol145. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 146. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 147. John Horne and a woman 148. Northampton Shoemaker 149. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 150. More Persecution at Lichfield 151. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife152. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent153. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury154. The 'Bloody Commission'155. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester156. Five Burnt at Smithfield157. Stephen Gratwick and others158. Edmund Allen and other martyrs159. Edmund Allen160. Alice Benden and other martyrs161. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs162. Ambrose163. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper164. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs165. John Thurston166. Thomas More167. George Eagles168. Richard Crashfield169. Fryer and George Eagles' sister170. John Kurde171. Cicelye Ormes172. Joyce Lewes173. Rafe Allerton and others174. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston175. Persecution at Lichfield176. Persecution at Chichester177. Thomas Spurdance178. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson179. John Rough and Margaret Mearing180. Cuthbert Simson181. William Nicholl182. Seaman, Carman and Hudson183. Three at Colchester184. A Royal Proclamation185. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs186. Richard Yeoman187. John Alcocke188. Alcocke's Epistles189. Thomas Benbridge190. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs191. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver192. Three at Bury193. The Final Five Martyrs194. William Living195. The King's Brief196. William Browne197. Some Persecuted at Suffolk198. Elizabeth Lawson199. Edward Grew200. The Persecuted of Norfolk201. The Persecuted of Essex202. Thomas Bryce203. The Persecuted in Kent204. The Persecuted in Coventry and the Exiles205. Thomas Parkinson206. The Scourged: Introduction207. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax208. Thomas Greene209. Bartlett Greene and Cotton210. Steven Cotton's Letter211. Scourging of John Milles212. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw213. Robert Williams214. Bonner's Beating of Boys215. A Beggar of Salisbury216. John Fetty217. James Harris218. Providences: Introduction219. The Miraculously Preserved220. Christenmas and Wattes221. Simon Grinaeus222. John Glover223. Dabney224. Alexander Wimshurst225. Bosom's wife226. The Delivery of Moyse227. Lady Knevet228. Crosman's wife229. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk230. Congregation of London231. Robert Cole232. Englishmen at Calais233. John Hunt and Richard White234. Punishments of Persecutors235. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth236. The Westminster Conference237. Nicholas Burton238. Another Martyrdom in Spain239. Baker and Burgate240. Burges and Hoker241. Justice Nine-Holes242. Back to the Appendix notes243. A Poor Woman of Exeter244. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material245. Priest's Wife of Exeter246. Gertrude Crockhey
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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999 [931]

What quod Maister Chamley, late chiefe iustice, doth not Christ saye playnely that it is his very flesh and his very blood, and we must nedes eate him or we can haue no lyfe? Syr quod I if you wil heare how Saint Augustine expoundeth that place, ye shal perceaue that ye are in a wronge dore: and when I began to tell S. Augustines mynd in lib. de doctrina christiana, ye ye quod M. Secretary, that is true Saint Augustine doth take it figuratiuely in dede. Fortie yeares ago quod Maister Fecknam, al was of one opinion in this matter. forty yeres a go quod I all held that the byshop of Rome was supreme head of the vniuersall church. What then Maister Fecknam was beginning to saye. &c. but Maister Secretary toke the tale, & said þt was but a positiue law A positiue law quod I? no syr he would not haue it so. for it is in his decrees þt he challēged it by christes own word. for his decre saith nullis syndocis constitutis, neque conciliis sed viua voce domini prælata est ecclesia Romana omnibus ecclesiis in toto mundo, dicente domino Petro, tu es Petrus. &c. and in another, he intreateth, tu es Cephas. i. caput. tush it was not counted an article, (quod maister Secretarye) of our faith, which is to be beleued vnder pain of damnation. Yes sayde I, if ye call that an artycle of our fayth whiche is to be beleued vnder pain of dānatiō. For he saith: omnino definimus declaramus, pronūciamus, omnē creaturā

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subesse Romano pontifici de necessitate salutis,  

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The English translations of passages from patristic fathers and from the Vulgate, which appear throughout this dialogue, were introduced in the 1570 edition.

and here when we speak of lawes and decrees, maister Chomley thoughte himselfe muche wronged, that he could not bee suffered: the reste was so ready to speake, and then he vp & tolde a long tale what lawes was of kynges of England made against the bishop of Rome, & was vehement to tell how they alway of the clergy did flie to him: & here because he semed to speake of many things besyde our purpose, whereof we spake before, he was aunswered of his owne felowes: and I lette them talke. Finally we departed in peace, and maister Secretary promised in the ende, that of their talk there shoulde come to me no harme: and after I had made my mone for lacke of my bookes, he sayde they were all once geuen him: but sith he yet knoweth who hath them nowe, wryte me the names of suche as ye would haue, and I wyll speake for you the best I can.

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VPpon the articles aboue mentioned, and inquisition made vpon the same, diuers ministers were diuorced from their wyues: amongest whome was one Iohn Draper, and Ioane Golde his wyfe, in the Diocesse of London, troubled and vexed for the same, by Boner, who sent foorth a commission with a processe, to sequester and separate them, inioyning also penance to her, the tenor of whiche commission we haue here adioyned.

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¶ The Commission of Boner, to separate a maryed minister from his wyfe.
E Dmundus. &c. dilecto nobis in Christo magistro Wilhelmo Roper, in legibus Baccalaureo, salutem, gratiam & benedictionem. De tua sana doctrina, conscientiæ puritate, & circumspectionis industria plurimum confidentes, ad euocandum & euocari faciendum coram te in iudicio, quibuscunque die & loco congruis & oportunis, arbitrio tuo limitandis, Iohannem Draper præsbiterum, nuper Rectorem ecclesiæ parochialis de Rayleighe nostræ London diocesis & iurisdictionis, & quandam Iohannam Gold, quam alias dictus Iohannes contra sacros canones constitutionesque & ordinationes laudabiles sanctæ matris ecclesiæ catholicæ temere & de facto duxit in vxorem, causamque & negotium illius prætensi & illegitimi matrimonij cum suis annexis, connexis, quibuscunque, audiendum, & examinadum: eosdem quoque delinqūtes iuxta iuris exigentiam ab inuicem diuortiandum & separandum, atque vt de cætero seorsim & seperatim viuant, nulloque modo inuicem cohabitent, aut carnale commercium habeant, mandandum & sub pæna iuris moneudum & iubendum, necnon pænitentiam salutarem & condignam dictæ Iohannæ Golde propter sua delicta & exceßus in hac parte ac iurisdictione, iuxta qualitatē eorūdē prout discretione tunc melius vibebitur expedire, iniungendum & imponendum, cæteraque omnia & singula in præmissis, aut ea necessaria seu quomodolibet requisita, faciendum, excercendum, exequendum, & expediendum, vices nostras committimus, ac plenam in domino, tenore præsentium concedimus potestatem, cuiuslibet legitimæ cohertionis ecclesiasticæ quæ deereueris in hac parte, aßumpto tibi in actorum scribam in præmissis quocumque notario fideli, & ideneo, mandantes quatenus de omni eo quod in præmissis, & circa ea faceritis, sigillum officialitatié. in cuius rei. &c.  
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In the 1563 edition, Foxe printed a commission from Bishop Bonner, divorcing John Draper, of the parish of Rayleigh, from the wife he had married in Edward VI's reign; it was omitted in subsequent editions (see textual variant 33). The source for this information was Bonner's register (Guildhall MS 9531/12, fol. 348r)

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BEsides this Iohn Draper, diuerse ther wer whiche also were diuorced in thys tyme of Quene Mary: Many also there were which beyng maryed, were contente, and soughte of theyr owne vnconstant accorde, to bee seperated from theyr wiues, some of Chichester (who because they soone recouered agayne, I wyll not here name.) An other named Edmōd Alstone, an other Alexander Bull: with many other, whose names together in the ende of this

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story of Quene Mary, we will so muche as we may by Goddes grace, in a generall catologe together comprehende. 

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Foxe's comment that he planned an appendix listing priests who divorced their wives under Mary (1563, p. 931; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1428) explains his gathering together in his papers lists of clergy deprived for marriage (see BL Harley 421, fols. 56r-63v). Apparently Foxe decided against publishing this appendix, probably because it would have embarrassed too many Elizabethan clerics.

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How Thomas Cranmer...

Many of this section's glosses are concerned with the preparations for and early skirmishes in the Oxford disputations. Some of the glosses malign the papists, and Foxe seems quick to highlight the pomp (and the pride implicit in it) of the papists ('The Doctors in theyr scarlet robes', and 'Procession in Oxford. The aray of the solemne procession'). For other attacks on the papists, see 'A grace for Articles', 'A grace for the Cambridge Doctours to dispute agaynst Cranmer, Ridley & Latimer', 'D. Cranmer closed in by the Mayor and Aldermen for running away'.

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MarginaliaAprill. 12.  
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Block 17: Preparations for the Oxford Disputations

The account of the disputations at Oxford in April 1554 is the heart of Book 10. Foxe took special pains both in acquiring information about the disputations and in shaping it. The number of different versions upon which Foxe was able to draw and his meticulous, almost obsessive care in editing, make the section on the Oxford disputations the most complex in Book 10, if not in the entire Actes and Monuments. The intensive rewriting and editing of Foxe's account of the disputations, while making it difficult to collate, also provide a remarkable look at Foxe's editorial goals and practices.

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Paradoxically, the lengthy account of the preparations for the disputations, which one would expect, given its relative unimportance, to be fairly straightforward, is in fact remarkably intricate. There was nothing on these preparations in the Rerum, but in the 1563 edition Foxe had two separate reports of events, both by eyewitnesses. (The first informant's account was obtained by Foxe while in exile and used, sparingly, in the Rerum, for events during and after the disputation). Both informants were staunch protestants but their accounts are quite different. The first informant's account covers all of the disputations, the second informant merely the events preceding the actual disputations; consequently the second informant's account, although shorter, is more detailed. The second informant may have been connected to Oxford University as he is much more knowledgeable about the reaction of the Oxford faculty to the disputations. In the 1563 edition, Foxe did not have the time to synthesise the two accounts and he printed them separately (pp. 932-36 and 936-38 respectively). In the edition of 1570, Foxe welded the two accounts with remarkable patience and attention to detail.

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But why did Foxe bother with this carefully crafted and detailed account of what were merely the preparations for the disputations? Partly because, as we have seen, Foxe had good sources; but particularly because this detailed account enabled Foxe to set the David versus Goliath theme of the disputations; the pomp and ceremony of the serried ranks of academia defied by three lone men.

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ABout the tenth of Apryll, Cranmer Archbishop of Canterburye, Ridley Bishop of London, and Hugh Latimer, once bishop of Worcester were conueyghed as prisoners from the Tower to Wyndsore: And after frō thence to the vniuersitie of Oxforde, there to dispute with the diuines and learned men of

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the
OOo.iiii.