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1035 [1035]

K. Henry. 8. The historye of Zuinglius, and of the Suitzers.

Who had diuers cōflictes with Lupoldus, brother to the forenamed Fridericke Duke of Austria, fightyng in his brothers quarell. As Lupoldus had reared a mighty army of xx. thousand footemē and horsemen, and was come to Egre, so to passe ouer the mountaines to subdue the pages: he began to take aduise of his counsaile, by what way or passage best he might direct hys iourney toward the Suitzers. MarginaliaA fooles bolte sometimes hyttes the marke.Whereupon as they were busy in consultyng, there stoode a foole by (named Kune de Stocken) whiche hearyng their aduise, thought also to shote hys bolt with all, and tolde them that their counsaile dyd not like him. For all you (quoth he) counsulte how we should enter into yonder countrey: but none of you geueth any counsaile how to come out agayne, after we bee entred. And in conclusion, as the foole sayd, so they found it true. For when Lupoldus, with hys hoste had entred into the straites and valleyes betwene the rockes & mountaines, the Suitzers with theyr neighbours of Vrania, and Syluania lying in pryuye wayte, had thē at such aduantage, and with tumblyng downe stones from the rockes, and sodeine commyng vpon theyr backes in blind laynes, did so encomber them, that neither they had conuenient standyng to fight, nor roume almost to flye away. By reason wherof, a great part of Lupoldus armye there beyng enclosed about the place called Morgarten, lost their lyues, and many in the flight were slayne. Lupoldus with them that remayned, retired and escaped to Thurgoia. This battaile was fought. an. 1315. Nouem. 16.

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MarginaliaThe first league betwene the three Pages.After this, the burgers of these iij. villages, beyng continually vexed by Fridericke Duke of Austria, for that they would not knowledge hym for Emperour, assembled them selues in the towne of Vrania. an. 1316. and there entred a mutuall league and bond of perpetuall societie and coniunction, ioyning and swearing them selues, as in one body of a common wealth, and publike administratiō, together. After that came to them Lucernates, then Tugiani, after thē the Tigurines, next to thē folowed Bernates, the last almost of all, were þe Basiliās, then folowed after, the other vij. pages aboue recited.

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And thus haue ye the names, the freedome, and confederation of these Suitzers, or Cantons or pages of Heluetia, with the occasions and circumstāces therof briefly expressed. Now to the purpose of our story intended, whiche is to declare the successe of Christes Gospell and true Religion receaued among these Heluetians: also touching the lyfe and doctrine of Zuinglius, and order of hys death, as here insueth.

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¶ The actes and lyfe of Zuinglius and of receauing the Gospell in Suitzerland.

MarginaliaVldrichus Zuinglius.IN the tractation of Luthers story, mention was made before of Vldricus Zuinglius: Who first abyding at Glarona, in a place called then our lordes Ermitage, frō thence remoued to Zuricke, aboute the yeare of our Lord. 1519. and there began to teach, dwelling in þe Minster among the Canons or Priestes of that close, vsyng with them, the same rites and ceremonies duryng the space of ij. or iij. yeares, MarginaliaZuinglius reading the Scriptures at Zurike.where he continued readyng and explaynyng the Scriptures vnto the people with great trauaile, and no lesse dexteritie. And because Pope Leo, the same yeare, had renued his pardons agayn through all countreys (as is aboue declared) MarginaliaZuinglius agaynst the popes pardons.Zuinglius zelously withstode the same, detectyng the abuses thereof by the Scriptures, and of other corruptions reigning then in the Churche, and so continued he the space of ij. yeares and more, MarginaliaAn. 1521
The byshop of Constance complayneth agaynst Zuinglius.
till at length Hugo Byshop of Constance (to whose iurisdiction Zuricke then also did belong) hearing therof, wrote his letters to the Senate of the sayd Citie of Zuricke, cōplainyng greuously of Zuinglius, who also wrote an other letter to the Colledge of Canons, where Zuinglius was the same tyme dwellyng, cōplaining likewise of such new teachers, which troubled the Church, & exhorted thē earnestly, to beware & to take diligēt heede to them selues. And for somuch as both the pope, & the Emperours Maiestie had cōdemned all such new doctrine by their Decrees and Edictes, he wylled them therfore to admitte no such new innouations of doctrine, without the common consent of them, to whom the same dyd apperteine. Zuinglius hearyng therof, referreth his cause to the iudgement and hearyng of the Senate, not refusing to render vnto them accompt of his faith. And for somuch as the Byshops letter was read openly in the Colledge, Zuinglius directeth an other letter to the Bishop agayn, declaryng that þe sayd letter proceded not frō the byshop, nor that he was ignoraūt who were the authors therof, desiryng him not to folow their sinister coūsailes, for that truth (sayd he) is a thyng inuincible, and can not be resisted. After he same tenour, certeine other of the Citie lykewise wrote vnto the Byshop, desiryng hym that hee would attempt nothyng, that should be preiudiciall to the libertie and free course of the Gospell: requiryng moreouer that he would forbeare no longer the filthy and infamous lyfe of priestes, but that he would permitte them to haue their lawfull wyues. &c. This was in the yeare of our Lord. 1522.

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MarginaliaZuinglius wryteth to the Heluetians.Besides this, Zuinglius wrote also an other letter to the whole nation of þe Heluetians, monyshyng thē, in no case to hynder the passage of syncere doctrine, nor to inferre any molestation to priestes that were maryed. MarginaliaPriestes mariage.For as for the vowe and coaction of their single lyfe, it came (sayd he) of the deuill, and a deuilish thing it is. And therfore, whereas the said Heluetians had such a rite and custome in their townes and pages, MarginaliaAn olde vse of the Heluetians to forewarne their priestes to take cōcubines.that when they receaued any new priest into their Churches, they vsed to premonish him before to take his cōcubine, lest he should attēpt any misuse with their wiues & daughters: he exhorted thē that they would no lesse graunt vnto them to take their wyues in honest matrimony, then to take concubines and harlotes, agaynst the precept of God.

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MarginaliaZuinglius resisted by aduersaryes.Thus as Zuinglius continued certeine yeares labouring in the word of the Lord, offense began to rise at this new doctrine, and diuers stept vp, namely the Dominick Friers on the contrary side, to preache and inuey agaynst hym. But he kepyng hymself euer within þe Scriptures, protested þt he would make good by the word of God, that whiche he had taught. Vpon this the Magistrates & Senate of Zuricke, sent forth their commaundement to all Priestes & Ministers within their dominion, to repayre to the Citie of Zuricke, agaynst the xxix. day of Ianuary next ensuyng (this was. an. 1523.) MarginaliaDisputations at Zurike about religion.there euery one to speake frely, and to be heard quietly, touchyng these controuersies of Religion, what could be sayd, directyng also their letters to the Byshop of Constāce, that he would either make his repayre thether him selfe, or els to send his deputie. When the day appointed came, MarginaliaIoan. Faber Stapulenses agaynst Zuinglius.and the Byshops vicegerent, whiche was Ioannes Faber, was also present: the Consul first declaryng the cause of this their frequencie and assemble (which was for the dissension newly rysen about matters of Religion) required, that if any there had to obiect, or inferre agaynst the doctrine of Zuinglius, he should freely and quietly vtter and declare hys mynde.

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MarginaliaEx Sled. Lib. 3.
Lxvij. articles of Zuinglius.
Zuinglius had disposed his matter before, and contriued all his doctrine in a certeine order of places, to the number of lxvij. Articles: which articles he had published also abroad before, to the ende that they whiche were disposed, might resorte thether better prepared to the disputation. When the Consul had finished that which hee would say, and had exhorted other to begyn: then Faber first entryng the matter, began to declare the cause of his sendyng thether, MarginaliaIohn Faber refuseth disputation.and afterwarde would persuade, that this was no place conuenient nor time fitte for discussing of such matter by disputation, but rather that the cognition and tractation therof belonged to a generall Coūcell, whiche he sayd, was already appointed, and now nere at hand. Notwithstandyng, Zuinglius still continued vrgyng and requyring him, that if he had there any thing to say or to dispute, he would openly & frely vtter his mind. To this he aunswered agayne, that he would confute his doctrine by writing. This done, with a few other wordes on both sides had to and fro, when no man would ap-

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