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1238 [1238]

K. Henry. 8. The Christening of Ladye Elizabeth. The story of the maide of Kent.

Gold. About it was a rayle couered with Saie. Betwene the Quiere and the body of the Churche, was a close place with a pan of fire, to make the childe ready in. These thinges thus ordered, the child was brought into the Hall, and then euery man sette forwarde. First the Citezins ij. and ij. Then the Gentlemen, Esquiers, and Chaplaines. Next after folowed the Aldermen & the Maior alone. Next the Maior, folowed the kinges Councell. Then þe kinges Chappell. Then Barons, Byshops, and Earles. Then came the Earle of Essex, bearing the couered Basons gilte. After him the Marques of Exetor with the Taper of virgine waxe. Next him, the Marques Dorset bearyng the Salt. Behynde him the Lady Mary of Northfolke bearyng the Chrisome, whiche was very riche of Pearle and stone. The olde Duchesse of Northfolke bare the childe in a mantle of purple Veluet, with a lōg traine furred with Ermine. The Duke of Northfolke with his Marshall rod, went on the righthād of the said Duchesse, and the Duke of Suffolke on the left hand. Before them went the Officers of Armes. The Countesse of Kent bare the long traine of the childes mantell. Betwene þe Coūtesse and the childe, went the Earle of Wilshyre on the right hand, and the Earle of Darby on the left hand, supportyng the sayd traine. In the middest ouer the child, was borne a Canapy by the Lord Rochford, the Lord Hussey, the Lord William Haward, and þe Lord Thomas Haward the elder. In this order they came vnto the Churche doore where the Byshop of London mette it, with diuers Abbottes and Byshops, and begā the obseruaunces of the Sacrament. MarginaliaCranmer godfather to Queene Elizabeth.The Archbyshop of Caunterbury was Godfather, and the old Duches of Northfolke, and the old Marchionesse of Dorset wydowes, were Godmothers, and the child was named Elizabeth.

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After all thinges were done at the Church doore, the child was brought to the Fonte and Christened. This done, Garter the chief king of Armes cryed aloud: God of his infinite goodnes, send prosperous lyfe and long, to the hygh and mighty Princesse of Englād, ELIZABETH. Then the Trompettes blewe, and the child was brought vp to the aultare, and immediatly confirmed by the Archbyshop, þe Marchionesse of Exceter beyng Godmother. Then the Archbishop of Canterbury gaue to the Princesse a stāding cuppe of Gold. The Duchesse of Northfolke gaue to her a stāding cuppe of Gold, fretted with Pearle. The Marchionesse of Dorset, three gilt boles pounced, with a couer. The Marchionesse of Exeter, three standyng boles gilt and grauē, with a couer. And so after a solemne banket ended with Ipocras, wafers, and such lyke in great plenty, they returned in like order again vnto the Court with the Princesse, and so departed.

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At the Mariage of this noble Lady, as there was no small ioy vnto all good and godly men, and no lesse hope of prosperous successe to Gods true Religion, so in like maner on the contrary part, the Papistes wanted not their malicious and secrete attemptes, as by the false hipocrisie and fained holines of a false fayned hipocrite this yeare beyng espied and found out, may sufficientlye appeare what their deuilishe deuises and purposes were. For certeine Monkes, Friers, and other euill disposed persons, of a deuilishe intent, had put into the heades of many of the kynges subiectes, that they had reuelation of God and his Saintes, that he was highly displeased with kyng Henry, for the diuorcemēt of the Lady Katherine, MarginaliaThe maide of Kent with her false fained hipocrisy apprehēded.& surmised amongest other thinges, that God had reueled to a Nunne, named Elizabeth Barton, 

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Elizabeth Barton is the subject of at least one good biography and a recent article by Richard Rex. [See, Alan Neame, The Holy Maid of Kent: The Life of Elizabeth Barton 1506-1534 (London, 1971) and Richard Rex, 'The execution of the Holy Maid of Kent', in Historical Research 64:155 (October, 1991), pp.216-20.]

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whom they called the holy mayde of Kēt, that in case the kyng proceded in the sayd diuorce, he should not be kyng of this realme, one moneth after, and in the reputatiō of God, not one day nor houre. This Elizabeth Barton by false dissimulation practised and shewed to the people, marueilous alteration of her visage and other partes of her body, as if she had bene rapt or in a traunce, and in those fayned traunces by false hipocrisie (as though she had ben inspired of God) she spake many wordes in rebukyng of sinne, and reprouyng the Gospell whiche she called heresie, and among them vttered diuers thinges to the great reproch of the Kyng and Queene, & to the establishing of Idolatry, Pilgrimage, and the derogation of Gods glory: which her naughtines beyng spyed out by the great labour and diligence of the Archbyshop of Caunterbury, the Lorde Cromwell, and Master Hugh Latimer, 
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At this time he was the rector of West Kington, Wiltshire (1531) and soon to be bishop of Worcester (from 12 August 1535).

she was condemned and putte to death with certeine of her affinitie and Councell in the moneth of Aprill. an. 1533. MarginaliaElizabeth Barton with her conspirators.The names of whiche conspiratours with her, were these: Edward Bockyng, Monke of Caunterbury. Richard Master, Person of Aldington. Iohn Deryng, Monke of Caunterbury. Hugh Riche, Frier Warden of the Gray Friers of Caunterbury. Richard Risby. Henry Gold, baccheler of Diuinitie, & Person of Aldermary. Fisher Byshop of Rochester. Iohn Adeson Priest, his Chaplein Thomas Laurēce, the Byshops Register of Caunterbury. Edwarde Thwates. 
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Edward Thwaites' treatise A marvellous work (an account of the nun's miracles and prophecies) was printed at the Robert Redmen press of London (1527). The treatise was referred to 'as very popular' by Cranmer in a letter of 1533 [for which see, Diane Watt, Secretaries of God: Women Prophets in Late Medieval and Early Modern England (Cambridge, 2001), p.58; Miscellaneous Writings and Letters of Thomas Cranmer, 2 vols. ed. by J E Cox (Cambridge, 1846), ii, p.273]. Other men on the list include Thomas Abel (the author of Invicta veritas).

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Thomas Abell. Of the whiche persons the sayd Elizabeth Berton, Henry Gold, Richard Master, Edward Bockyng, Iohn Deryng, Hugh Riche, Richard Risby, were attainted of treason by Acte of Parlament, and put to execution. 
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20 April 1534.

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The residue, as Fisher Byshop of Rochester, Thomas Gold, Thomas Laurence, Edward Thwates, Iohn Adeson, Thomas Abell, beyng conuicte and atteinted of misprison, 

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Misprision of treason is an offence which is committed by someone who knows that a treason offence is going to happen but who fails to report this to the authorities while an attainder is an act of parliament which declares a person guilty of a crime without the need of trial. Fisher was sent to the Tower on 26 April 1534.

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were cōdemned to prison, and forfaited their goodes and possessions to the kyng. Ex Statut. an. 25. Reg. Hen. 8.

MarginaliaA meruelous iudgement of God agaynst Pauier an opē enemy to his word.Edward Hall, 

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Barton and the executions are mentioned in the 1550 edition of Hall's Chronicle at fols.218v and 223v.

a writer of our Englysh Stories, makyng mention of this Elizabeth Barton aforesayd, adioineth next in his boke, the narration of one Pauier or Pauie, a notorious enemye (no doubt) to Gods truth. This Pauier 
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For William Pavier, see Edward Hall, The Union of the Two Noble and Illustre Families of Lancastre & York, 2 vols., ed. by H Ellis (London, 1809), ii, p.806; Susan Brigden, London and the Reformation (Oxford, 1989), pp.218-9.

beyng the towne Clerke of the Citie of London, was a man (sayth he) that in no case could abide to heare that the Gospell should be in English: In so much that the sayd Halle hym selfe heard hym once say vnto hym, and to other by, swearyng a great othe: that if hee thought þe kynges highnes would set forth the Scripture in Englishe, and let it be read of the people by his authoritie, rather then he would so lōg lyue, he would cut his owne throate: but hee brake promise (sayth Halle) for hee did not cut his throate with any knife, but with an halter did hang him selfe. Of what minde and intent, he so did, God iudge.

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MarginaliaPauier a bitter enemy agaynst Rich. Baynham.My information farther addeth this, touchyng the said Pauier or Pauie, that he was a bitter enemie, very busie at þe burnyng of Rich. Baynhā aboue mentioned. Who hearing the said Baynham at the stake speaking agaynst Purgatory and transubstantiation: set fire (sayd he) to this hereticke and burne him. And as the trayne of gunnepouder came toward the Martyr, hee lifted vp his eyes and handes to heauen, saying to Pauier: God forgiue thee, and shewe thee more mercy, thē thou doest to me. The Lord forgiue Syr Thomas More, and pray for me al good people: and so continued he praying, till the fire tooke his bowels & his head. &c.

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After whose Martyrdome, the next yeare folowyng, this Pauier the towne Clerke of the Citie, went and bought ropes. Whiche done, he went vp to an high garret in his house to pray, as he was wont to doe, to a roode which he had there, before whō he bitterly wept: And as his owne mayde commyng vp founde hym so doyng, hee bad her take the rustye sword, and go make it cleane, and trouble him no more, MarginaliaPauier a persecutor hanged himselfe.and immediatly he tyed vp the rope, and hong him selfe. The maides hart still robbed, and so came vp, and found hym but newly hāged. Then she hauyng no power to helpe him, ranne crying to the Church to her mistres to fetche her home. His seruauntes and Clerkes he had sent out before to Finisbery, and to M. Edney Sergeaunt to the Lord Maior 

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The mayor of London was Sir Christopher Ascue.

, dwellyng ouer Byshops gate, to tary for him at Finisbery Court, till he came: but hee had dispatched

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hym
BBB.i.