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1256 [1256]

K. Henry. 8. Rochester and More beheaded. Monkes of the Charterhouse.

and contumeliously he writeth agaynst 

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Foxe is referring here to an impressive canon of works, including Responsio ad Lutherum (1523), The Supplycacyon of Soulys (1529), A Dialogue Concerning Tyndale (1529), The Confutation of Tyndale's Answer (1532), Syr Thomas More's answer to the fyrste parte of the poysoned booke … named 'The Souper of the Lorde' (1532), A Letter impugnynge the erronyouse wrytyng of John Fryth against the Blessed Sacrament of the Aultare (1533) and The Second parte of the Confutacion of Tyndal's Answere (1533).

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Luther, Zuinglius, Tyndall, Frith, Barnes, Bayfild, Baynham, Teukesbery, falsely belying their Articles and doctrine, as (God grauntyng me lyfe) I haue sufficient matter to proue agaynst hym.

MarginaliaM. More a persecutour.Briefly, as he was a sore persecutor of thē that stode in defense of the Gospell: so agayne on the other side, such a blynd deuotion he bare to the popeholy Sea of Rome, and so wylfullye stoode in the Popes quarel agaynst hys owne Prince, that he would not gyue ouer till hee had brought the Scaffold 

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More was executed on 6 July 1535.

of the Tower hyll with the axe and all vpon hys owne necke.

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Edward Hall in hys Chronicle 

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Foxe is here largely quoting directly from the 1550 edition of Hall's Chronicle (fol.226v).

wrytyng of the death and maners of thys Syr Thomas More, seemeth to stande in doubte, whether to call him a folyshe wyse man, or a wyse folyshe man. For as by nature he was indued with a great wytte, so the same agayn was so myngled (sayeth he) with tauntyng and mockyng, that it semed to them that best knew hym, that he thought nothing to be wel spokē, except he had ministred some mocke in the cōmunication: in somuch as at hys commyng to the Tower, one of the Officers demaūding his vpper garmēt for his fee, meanyng hys gowne, hee aunswered that hee shoulde haue it, and tooke hym hys cappe, saying it was the vppermost garment that he had. MarginaliaM. More scoffer vnto hys death.Likewise, euen going to hys death at the Tower gate, a poore woman called vnto hym, and besought him to declare that he had certayne euidences of hers in the tyme that he was in office (which after he was apprehended, she coulde not come by) and that he would intreate þt she might haue them agayn, or els she was vndone. He aunswered, good woman, haue pacience a litle while, for the king is good vnto me, that euē within thys halfe houre, he wyll discharge me of all busynesses, and helpe thee hymselfe. Also when he went vp the stayer on þe Skaffold, he desired one of the Shiriffes officers to geue hym hys hand to helpe hym vp, and sayed, when I come downe agayne, let me shyft for my selfe aswell as I can. Also the hangman kneled downe to hym askynge hym forgeuenes of hys death, as the maner is. To whom he sayed, I forgeue thee, but I promise thee, that thou shalt neuer haue honestie of the strykyng of my head, my necke is so short. Also, euen when he should lay downe his head on the block, he hauing a great gray beard, striked out his beard and sayd to the hangman, I pray you let me lay my beard ouer þe block least you should cut it. Thus with a mocke he ended hys lyfe.

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There is no doubt, 

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Foxe the prophet! More and Fisher were beatified along with about fifty other English martyrs on 29 December 1886 and both were canonized in 1935.

but that þe Popes holines hath halowed & dignified these two persons long since, for Catholicke Martyrs. Neyther is it to bee doubted, but after an hundreth yeares expired, they shal also be shryned and portessed, dying as they did in that quarell of the Church of Rome, that is, in takyng the Byshop of Romes part, agaynst their own ordinary and naturall prince. Whereunto (because the matter asketh a long discourse and a peculiar tractation) I haue not in thys place, much to contende with Cope my frende. This briefly for a memorandū may suffice, that if þe causes of true Martyrdome ought to be pondered & not to be nūbred, and if þe end of Martyrs is to be weyed by iudgement, and not by affectiō: then the cause and quarel of these men standyng as it doeth, and beyng tryed by Gods worde, perhaps in the Popes kyngdome they may go for Martyrs, in whose cause they dyed: but certes in Christes kyngdome their cause will not stād, how soeuer they stand them selues.

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MarginaliaRochester, More, Exmew, Myddlemore, Nudigate, executed for treason.The lyke also is to be sayd of the iij. Monkes 

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The executions of Exmewe, Middlemore and Newdigate, all of the London house of the Carthusian order, took place on 19 June 1535.

of Charterhouse Exmew, Middlemore, and Nudigate, who the same yeare in the moneth of Iune, were lykewyse attached and arreined at Westminster, for speakyng certeine traiterous wordes agaynst the kynges crown and dignitie: for the which they were hanged, drawen, and quartered at Tyburne. Whom also, because Cope my good frend doth repute and accepte in the nūber of holy Catholicke Martyrs, here would be asked of hym a question: what Martyrs be they, which standyng before the Iudge, denye their owne wordes and sayings and pleade not giltie, so as these Carthusiās did: wherby it appeareth, that they would neither haue stād nor haue died in that cause, as they did, if they might otherwise haue escaped by denying. Wherfore, if my frende Cope had bene so well aduised in settyng out hys Martyrs 
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Foxe refers to a treatise entitled Dialogi sex contra summi Pontificatus, monasticae vitae, sanctorum, sacrarum imaginum oppugnatoreset pseudomartyrs (Antwerp, 1566), which was written by Nicolas Harpsfield. The Dialogi is, in part six, an attack on Foxe's Acts and Monuments which forced him into the removal of much disputed material in later editions.

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, as God might haue made hym, hee would first haue sene the true recordes, & bene sure of the ground of such matters, wherupon he so confidently pronounceth, and so censoriously controlleth others.

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MarginaliaEx actis in termino Paschæ an. 27. Reg. Hen. 8.In the same cause and quarell of treason also, the same yeare, a litle before these aforesayd in the moneth of May, were executed with the like punishemēt, Iohn Houghton Priour of the Charterhouse in London. Robert Laurence Priour of the Chartherhouse of Beluaile. Austen Webster Priour of the Chaterhouse of Exham.

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Besyde and with these. iij. priours, suffered lykewise the same tyme. ij. other Priestes, one called Reginold, brother of Syon, the other named Ioh. Haile Vicar of Thistleworth.

Marginalia9. Carthusians dyed in prison, refusing the kinges supremacie.Diuers other Charterhouse monkes also of Londō were then put in prison, to the number of. ix. or. x. and in the same prison dyed, for whom we wyll (the Lorde willing) reserue an other place hereafter to intreate of more at large.

MarginaliaM. Copes ix. worthyes.In the meane tyme, for somuch as the foresaid Cope in hys doughtye Dialogues, speaking of these. ix. worthies, doth commend them so highly, and especially the. iij. Priours aboue recited, here by þe way I would desyre M. Cope simplye and directly to aunswere me to a thing or. ij. that I woulde put to hym, and fyrst, of this Iohn Houghtō that angelical Prior of the Charterhouse, his old companion and aquantance, of whom thus he writeth: 

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This is from Dialogi (part 6, p.995).

MarginaliaCopus in Dialog. 6. pag. 993.Atqui cùm Ioannē illum Houghtonium cogito, non tam hominem quàm Angelum in humana forma intueri mihi videor, cuius eminentes virtutes, diuinas dotes, & heroicam animi magnitudinem, nemo vnquam poterit satis pro dignitate explicare. &c. By these hys owne wordes it must neede be confessed, that the Author of these Dialogues, who soeuer he was, had well seene & considered the forme and personable stature, proportion and shape of his excellēt body, with such admiration of hys personage, that (as he saith) so ofte as he calleth the said Iohn Houghton to mynde, it seemeth to hym, euen as thoughe he saw an Aungell in the shape and forme of a mā. Whose eminēt vertues moreouer, whose diuine giftes, and heroicall celsitude of minde, no man (sayth he) may sufficiētly expresse. &c. And how old was this M. Cope thē I would know, whē he saw and discerned all this. MarginaliaCopes Dialogues suspected not to be hys owne.For as I vnderstand, M. Cope beyng yet at this present scarse come to the age of xl. yeares, he could not be then aboue ix. yeare old (the other sufferyng an. 1535.) in þe which age, in my minde, M. Cope had small discretiō to iudge either of any such Angelicall proportion of mans personage, or of hys diuine qualities, and heroicall celsitude of his mynde, as yet he remembreth in hys Dialogues. Whiche thyng amōg many other probabilities, maketh me vehemētly to suspect, þt these Dialogues printed in Antwerpe, an. 1566. were brought ouer by M. Cope there to be printed, but were penned and framed by an other Pseudocopus, what soeuer, or in what fleete so euer hee was, vnlesse my markes do greatly fayle me. But as the case is of no great weyght, so I let it passe, returnyng to other matters of more importance.

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Shortely after the ouerthrow of the Pope, consequētly begā by litle & litle, to folow the ruine 

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Foxe may be referring to the 1536 act 'Dissolution of the Monasteries' (27 Henry VIII, c.28) or the valuation effort of 1535 which resulted in the Valor Ecclesiasticus the inadvertent first step toward the dissolutions.

of Abbais & Religious houses in England, in a right order & Methode by Gods diuine prouidence. For neyther coulde the fall of monasteries haue folowed after, vnlesse that suppression of the Pope had gone before, neyther could any true reformation of the Church haue bene attēp-

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ted
CCC.iiiij.
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