Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Censorship Proclamation 32. Our Lady' Psalter 33. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain34. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 35. Bradford's Letters 36. William Minge 37. James Trevisam 38. The Martyrdom of John Bland 39. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 40. Sheterden's Letters 41. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 42. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 43. Nicholas Hall44. Margery Polley45. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 46. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 47. John Aleworth 48. Martyrdom of James Abbes 49. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 50. Richard Hooke 51. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 52. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 53. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 54. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 55. Martyrdom of William Haile 56. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 57. William Andrew 58. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 59. Samuel's Letters 60. William Allen 61. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 62. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 63. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 64. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 65. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 66. Cornelius Bungey 67. John and William Glover 68. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 69. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 70. Ridley's Letters 71. Life of Hugh Latimer 72. Latimer's Letters 73. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed74. More Letters of Ridley 75. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 76. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 77. William Wiseman 78. James Gore 79. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 80. Philpot's Letters 81. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 82. Letters of Thomas Wittle 83. Life of Bartlett Green 84. Letters of Bartlett Green 85. Thomas Browne 86. John Tudson 87. John Went 88. Isobel Foster 89. Joan Lashford 90. Five Canterbury Martyrs 91. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 92. Letters of Cranmer 93. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 94. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 95. William Tyms, et al 96. Letters of Tyms 97. The Norfolk Supplication 98. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 99. John Hullier 100. Hullier's Letters 101. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 102. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 103. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 104. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 105. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 106. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 107. Gregory Crow 108. William Slech 109. Avington Read, et al 110. Wood and Miles 111. Adherall and Clement 112. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 113. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow114. Persecution in Lichfield 115. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 116. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 117. Examinations of John Fortune118. John Careless 119. Letters of John Careless 120. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 121. Agnes Wardall 122. Peter Moone and his wife 123. Guernsey Martyrdoms 124. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 125. Martyrdom of Thomas More126. Martyrdom of John Newman127. Examination of John Jackson128. Examination of John Newman 129. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 130. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 131. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 132. John Horne and a woman 133. William Dangerfield 134. Northampton Shoemaker 135. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 136. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1460 [1434]

Q. Mary. The condemnation and degradation of M. Hooper.

Marginalia1555. February.dement that they should not bee suffered to speake one with an other, neither yet any other permitted to come at them that night.

MarginaliaThe thyrd and last examination of M. Hooper.Vpon the next day following, the. xxix. of Ianuary, at the houre appoynted they were brought again by the Sheriffes, before the said Bishop and Commissioners in the Church, where they were the day before. And after long and earnest talke, when they perceyued that maister Hooper would by no meanes condescend vnto them, they caused hym to be disgraded, MarginaliaM. Hooper condemned.and read vnto him his condemnation. 

Commentary  *  Close

A record of Hooper's condemnation, copied from a now missing act book, is in Foxe's papers (BL, Harley 421, fos. 46r-48v).

That done, M. Rogers was brought before them, and in like maner intreated: and so they deliuered both of them to the secular power the two Sheriffes of London, who were willed to carry them to the Clinke, a prison not farre from the Bishop of Winchesters house, and there to remaine tyl night.

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When it was darke, maister Hooper was led by one of þe Sheriffes, with many Bylles & weapons, first through the Bishop of Winchesters house, and so ouer London Bridge, through the citie to Newgate. And by the way, some of the Sergeauntes were willed to goe before, and put out the Costerdmongers candels, who vse to sit wyth light in the streates: eyther fearing (of likelyhood) that the people would haue made some attempt to haue taken hym away from them by force, if they had seene hym go to that prison: or els beyng burdened wyth an euyll conscience: MarginaliaDarknes best for the Papistes.they thought darknes to be a most fit season for such a busines.

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But notwithstanding this deuise, the people hauyng some foreknowledge of his commyng, many of them came foorth of their doores with lightes and saluted hym, MarginaliaThe people reioycyng at the constancye of M. Hooper and M. Rogers.praysing God for his constancie in the true doctrine whiche he had taught them, and desiring God to strengthen hym in the same to the ende. Maister Hooper passed by, and required the people to make their earnest prayers to God for hym, and so went through Cheapeside to the place appoynted, and was deliuered as close prisoner, to the keeper of Newegate, MarginaliaM. Hooper sent to Newgate. where he remayned sixe dayes, no body being permitted to come to hym, or to talke with hym, sauyng his keepers and such as shoulde bee appoynted therto.

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During this tyme, MarginaliaB. Boner & his chaplaynes reason with M. Hooper in prison.Boner Bishop of London, and others at his appoyntment, as Fecknam, Chedsey, and Harpsfield. &c. resorted diuers tymes vnto hym to assaye if by any meanes they coulde perswade hym to relent and become a member of their Antichristian Church. Al the wayes they coulde deuise, they attempted. For besides disputations and allegations of testimonies of the Scriptures and of auncient writters wrasted to a wrong sense, according to their accustomed maner, they vsed also all outward gentlenes and significations of frendship, with many great profers and promises of worldly commodities, not omittyng also most greeuous threatnynges, if with gentlenes they could not preuaile: but they found him alwayes one man, stedfast and immoueable.

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When they perceyued that they could by no meanes reclame hym to their purpose, with such perswasions and offers as they vsed for his conuersion, then went they about by MarginaliaFalse rumors of M. Hoopers recantation.false rumors and reportes of recantations (for it is wel knowen that they and their seruauntes did spreade it first abroade) to bring hym and the doctrine of Christe which he professed, out of credite with the people. So the bruite being a litle spread abroade, and beleued of some of the weaker sort, by reason of the often resort of the Bishop of London and other, it encreased more, and at the last came to M. Hoopers eares. Wherewith he was not a litle greued, that the people should geue so light credite vnto false rumours, hauyng so simple a ground: as it may appeare by a letter which he wrote vpon that occasion, the copie wherof foloweth.

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A letter of maister Hooper for the stoppyng of certaine false rumours spread abroade, of his recantation. 
Commentary  *  Close

Hooper wanted this letter to be widely circulated and, judging from the number of copies which survive, he succeeded. Copies of it among Foxe's papers are: BL, Lansdowne 389, fos. 4v-5r; ECL 260, fos. 225v-226r and BL, Add. 19400, fo. 28r. A copy of the letter came into Foxe's hands in exile and it was printed in Rerum, p. 290; 1563; Letters of the Martyrs, pp. 130-31 and subsequent editions of the Acts and Monuments.

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THe grace of our Lord Iesus Christe be with all them that vnfainedly looke for the commyng of our Saueour Christ. Amen.

MarginaliaA purgation of M. Hooper against false rumors spread of his recantation.Deare brethren and sisters in the Lord, and my felowe prisoners for the cause of Gods Gospell: I doo much reioyce and geue thankes vnto God for your constancie and perseueraunce in affliction, vnto whom I wishe continuance vnto the end. And as I doo reioyce in your fayth and constancie in afflictions that be in prison: euen so doo I mourne and lament to heare of our deare brethren that yet haue not fealt such daungers for Gods truth, as we haue, and doo feele, and be dayly like to suffer more, yea the very extreme and vile death of the fire: yet such is the report abroade (as I am credibly enfourmed) that I Iohn Hoo-

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per a condemned man for the cause of Christ, should nowe after sentence of death (being in Newgate prisoner, and looking dayly for execution) recant and abiure that which heretofore I haue preached. MarginaliaThe occasion of this rumor how it riseth.And this talke ariseth of this, that the Bishop of London and his Chapleynes resort vnto me. Doubtles if our brethren were as godly as I would wishe them, they would thinke, that in case I dyd refuse to talke with them, they might haue iust occasion to say, that I wer vnlearned, and durst not speake with learned men, or els proude and disdainfull to speake with them. Therfore to auoyde iust suspition of both, I haue and doo dayly speake with them when they come: not doubtyng but that they report that I am neyther proude, nor vnlearned. And I would wish al men to do as I do in this point. For I feare not their argumentes, neither is death terrible vnto me, praying you to make true report of the same, as occasion shall serue: and that I am more confirmed in the truth which I haue preached heretofore by their commyng.

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Therefore ye that may sende to the weake brethren, pray them that they trouble me not with such reportes of recantations as they doo. For I haue hytherto leaft all thinges of the world, and suffered great paines & imprisonment, and I thanke God I am as ready to suffer death, as a mortall man may be. It were better for them to pray for vs, then to credit or report such rumours that be vntrue. We haue enemies enough of such as know not God truely. But yet MarginaliaFalse reportes a greuous crosse.the false report of weake brethren is a double crosse. I wishe you eternall saluation in Iesus Christe, and also require your continuall prayer, that he which hath begonne in vs, may continue it to the ende.

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I haue taught the truth with my tongue and with my pen heretofore, and hereafter shortly wyl confirme the same by Gods grace, with my bloud. Forth of Newgate the 2. of February. An. 1554.


Your brother in Christ,
Iohn Hooper.

Vpon Monday mornyng the Bishop of London came to Newgate, and there disgraded M. Hooper, the sentence of which his degradation here foloweth. 

Commentary  *  Close

It may seem surprising that Foxe goes to the trouble of printing the formula for Hooper's degradation and describing the degradation in such detail; after all, they were intended to humiliate the martyr. But this enables Foxe to establish an unspoken but potent comparison between the humiliation of the martyr and the humiliation of Christ in his Passion.

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Degradatio Hooperi.

MarginaliaThe sentence of Degradation agaynst M. Hooper.IN nomine † patris, † & filij, † & spiritus sancti. Amen. Quoniam per sententiam diffinitiuam à reuerendo in Christo patre et Domino Stephano permissione diuina, Winton. Episcopo in et contra te Iohannem Hooper præsbyterum, suæ iurisdictionis ratione hæresis et delicti infra illius diœcesin Winton. notoriè commissi existentem, nuper ritè & legitimè prolatam, cōstat sufficienter & legitimè nobis Edmundo London. Episcopo te præfatū Iohannem Hoper hæreticum manifestum & obstinatū, ac pertinacem fuisse & esse, ac constat similiter tanquam hæreticum huiusmodi per dictam sententiam pronunciatū et declaratū fuisse, maiorisq; excommunicationis sententia ob id innodatū et inuolutum similiter esse, ac ab ordine tuo deponendum et degradandum, curiæq; seculari ob demerita tua huiusmodi tradendum fore, prout ex tenore dictæ sentētiæ, ad quam nos in hac parte nos referimus, plenius, planius, et expressius liquet et apparet: Idcirco nos Edmundus Epis. London. antedictus, quia nostra et vniuersitatis etiam interest nostras hic partes interponere, et vicariam operam mutuamq; vicissitudinē impendere, in cuius etiam diœcesi tu Iohannes Hoper idem hæresis crimen tunc et sæpius, et ante et post commisisti, istis inquam et alijs prædictis attentis et exequendo omni meliori et efficatiori modo, quo possumus, sententiam prædictam, sic vt præmittitur, latam in te qui infra fines et limites diœcesis nostræ London. notoriè consistens, et in hac parte culpabilis et transgressor etiam notoriè existens, ad actualem degradationem tui præfati Iohannis Hooper (culpa tua exigente ac iustitia id poscente) duximus procedendū fore, ac sic etiam realiter procedimus, vt deinde iuxta iuris exigentiam et temporis retroacti morem laudabilem et normam consuetam, te in Arca Ecclesiæ manere nolentem, curiæ seculari ritè et legitimè ac effectualiter tradere possumus. Quod ipsum sic fieri debere, nos per hanc nostram sententiam siue decretum decernimus, pronuntiamus, et declaramus in hijs scriptis.

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After the sentence of degradatiō thus declared, now let vs see the forme and maner of their degrading, whiche here also foloweth. But first here is to be noted, that the disgrading of this blessed Bishop did not proceede against him as agaynst a Bishop, but as onely against a Priest, as they termed hym: for such as he was, these Baalamites accompted for no bishop.

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Here