Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Censorship Proclamation 32. Our Lady' Psalter 33. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain34. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 35. Bradford's Letters 36. William Minge 37. James Trevisam 38. The Martyrdom of John Bland 39. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 40. Sheterden's Letters 41. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 42. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 43. Nicholas Hall44. Margery Polley45. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 46. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 47. John Aleworth 48. Martyrdom of James Abbes 49. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 50. Richard Hooke 51. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 52. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 53. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 54. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 55. Martyrdom of William Haile 56. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 57. William Andrew 58. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 59. Samuel's Letters 60. William Allen 61. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 62. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 63. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 64. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 65. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 66. Cornelius Bungey 67. John and William Glover 68. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 69. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 70. Ridley's Letters 71. Life of Hugh Latimer 72. Latimer's Letters 73. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed74. More Letters of Ridley 75. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 76. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 77. William Wiseman 78. James Gore 79. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 80. Philpot's Letters 81. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 82. Letters of Thomas Wittle 83. Life of Bartlett Green 84. Letters of Bartlett Green 85. Thomas Browne 86. John Tudson 87. John Went 88. Isobel Foster 89. Joan Lashford 90. Five Canterbury Martyrs 91. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 92. Letters of Cranmer 93. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 94. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 95. William Tyms, et al 96. Letters of Tyms 97. The Norfolk Supplication 98. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 99. John Hullier 100. Hullier's Letters 101. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 102. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 103. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 104. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 105. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 106. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 107. Gregory Crow 108. William Slech 109. Avington Read, et al 110. Wood and Miles 111. Adherall and Clement 112. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 113. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow114. Persecution in Lichfield 115. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 116. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 117. Examinations of John Fortune118. John Careless 119. Letters of John Careless 120. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 121. Agnes Wardall 122. Peter Moone and his wife 123. Guernsey Martyrdoms 124. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 125. Martyrdom of Thomas More126. Martyrdom of John Newman127. Examination of John Jackson128. Examination of John Newman 129. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 130. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 131. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 132. John Horne and a woman 133. William Dangerfield 134. Northampton Shoemaker 135. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 136. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1599 [1573]

Q. Mary. Ghostly Letters of M. Iohn Bradford, holy Martyr.

Marginalia1555. Iuly.man. And as, in as much as he is an old man, he is a sinner and an enemy to God: so in as much as he is regenerate, he is righteous and holy, and a frend to God, the seede of God preseruyng him from sinne, so that hee cannot sinne, as the seede of the Serpent, wherewith he is corrupt euen from his conception, inclineth him, yea enforceth him to sinne, and nothyng els but to sinne: So that the best part in man before regeneration, in Gods sight, is not onely an enemy, but enmitie it selfe.

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MarginaliaHow one man may be called alwayes sinfull and alwayes iust.One man therefore, which is regenerate, well may be called alwayes iust, and alwayes sinnefull: iust in respect of Gods seede, and his regeneration: sinnefull in respect of Sathans seede and his first byrth. Betwixt these two men therefore, there is continuall conflict, and warre most deadly. MarginaliaWhy the old man oftentymes preuayleth agaynst the new man.The fleshe and old man by reason of his byrth that is perfect, doth often for a tyme, preuayle agaynst the new man (beyng but a child in comparison) and that in such sorte, as not onely other, but euen the children of GOD themselues thinke that they be nothyng els but old, and that the spirite and seede of God is lost and gone away, MarginaliaThe old man so mightely preuayleth sometimes agaynst the new in the children of God that the spirite and seede of God seemeth to be vtterly taken from them: wheras in deede, it is not so, as afterwardes to their great comfort, they finde and feele.where yet notwithstandyng, the truth is otherwise, the spirite and the seede of God at the length appearyng agayne, and dispellyng away the cloudes which couer the sonne of Gods seede from shynyng, as the cloudes in the ayre doe the corporall 

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Corporeal.

Sunne: so that sometimes a man can not tell by any sense, that there is any Sunne, the cloudes and windes so hidyng it from our sight: Euen so our cecitie  
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Blindness [OED].

or blyndnes, and corrupt affections do often shadowe the sight of Gods seede in Gods children, as though they were playne reprobates. Whereof it commeth, that they praying accordyng to their sense, but not accordyng to the truth, desire of God to giue them agayne his spirite, as though they had lost it, and he had taken it away. Whiche thyng God neuer doth in deede, although hee make vs to thinke so for a tyme: for alwayes hee holdeth his hand vnder his children in their faulles, that they lye not still as other doe which are not regenerate. And this is the difference betwixt Gods children whiche are generate and elect before all tymes in Christ, and the wicked cast awayes, that the elect lye not still continually in their sinne, as doe the wicked, but at the length doe returne agayne by reason of Gods seede, whiche is in them hid as a sparcle of fire in the ashes: as we may see in Peter, Dauid, Paule, Mary Magdalene, and others. For these (I meane Gods children) GOD hath made all thynges in Christ Iesu, to whom he hath geuen this dignitie, that they should be his inheritaunce and spouses.

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This our inheritour Christe Iesus, God with GOD, light of light, coeternall and consubstantiall with the Father and with the holy Ghost, to the ende that hee might become our husbande (because the husbande & the wife must be one body and fleshe) hath taken our nature vppon him, communicatyng with it and by it in his owne person, to vs all his children, his Diuine maiestie (as Peter sayth Marginalia2. Pet. 1.) and so is become flesh of our fleshe and bone of our bones substantially: as we are become flesh of his fleshe and bone of his bones spiritually, all that euer we haue pertainyng to him, yea euen our sinnes: as all that euer he hath, pertaineth vnto vs, euen his whole glory. So that if Sathan should sommon vs to aunswere for our dettes or sinnes, in that MarginaliaAs the wyfe is no sutable person, but the husband: so Christ being our husband, let him enter the Action for our sinnes.the wife is no sutable 

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Sueable

person but the husband, we may well byd him enter his action agaynst our husband Christ, and he will make him a sufficient aunswere.

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For this ende (I meane that we might be coupled and maryed thus to Christ, and so be certaine of saluation, and at godly peace with God in our consciences) God hath geuen his holy worde, which hath two partes (as now the chyldren of God doe consist of two men): one part of Gods word being proper to the old man, & the other part of Gods word beyng proper to the new man. MarginaliaThe law pertayneth to the old man and the Gospell to the new.The part properly pertainyng to the old man, is the law: the part properly pertainyng to the new man, is the Gospell.

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MarginaliaWhat the law is.The lawe is a doctrine whiche commaundeth and forbyddeth, requiryng doyng and auoyding. Vnder it therefore are contayned all preceptes, threatnynges, promises vpon conditions of our doyng and auoyding. &c. MarginaliaWhat the gospell is.The Gospell is a doctrine whiche alwayes offereth and geueth, requiryng on our behalfe, not as of worthynesse or as a cause, but as a certificate vnto vs, and therefore vnder it are contained all the free and sweete promises of God: as, I am the Lord thy God. &c.

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In those that bee of yeares of discretion, it requireth fayth, not as a cause, but as an instrument whereby we our selues may be certaine of our good husband Christ and of hys glory: and therfore when the conscience feeleth it selfe disquieted for feare of Gods iudgement agaynste sinne, she may in no wise looke vpon the doctrine pertainyng to the olde man, but on the doctrine onely that pertayneth to the new man, in it not lookyng for that which it requireth,

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MarginaliaThe conscience feared and beaten down with the terrour of Gods iudgement agaynst sinne, may not loke vpon the law, but fly to the gospell for reliefe and comfort.that is fayth, because we neuer beleue as we should: but onely on it whiche it offereth, and whiche it geueth, that is, on Gods grace and eternall mercy and peace in Christ. So shall she be in quyet, when she looketh for it altogether out of her selfe, in Gods mercy in Christ Iesu: in whose lappe if she lay her head with Saint Iohn, MarginaliaIohn. 13. then is she happy, and shall finde quietnesse in deede. When she feeleth her selfe quyet, then (in Gods name) let her looke on the law, and vppon such thynges as it requireth, thereby to bridle and keepe downe the olde Adam, to slay that Goliath: MarginaliaTo the conscience quieted and at peace with God, the law serueth only to keepe downe the olde man. from whom she must needes keepe the sweete promises, beyng the bed wherein her spouse and she meete and lye together. For as the wife will keepe her bed onely for her husband, although in other thynges she is contented to haue fellowshyppe with others, as to speake, sitte, eate, drinke, goe. &c. so our consciences, whiche are Christes wiues, must needes keepe the bed, that is, Gods sweete promises, alonely for our selues and our husband, there to meete together, to embace and laugh together, and to be ioyfull together. If sinne, the law, the Deuill, or any thyng would creepe into the bed and lye there, then complayne to thy husbande Christe, and foorthwith thou shalt see hym play Phinees part. MarginaliaNum. 25. Thus my dearely beloued, I haue geuen you in fewe woordse, a summe of all the Diuinitie whiche a Christian conscience can not want.

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¶ A Letter written to his Mother, as a farewell, when hee thought he should haue suffered shortly after. 
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This letter was first printed in Letters of the Martyrs, pp. 451-54.

MarginaliaAn other letter or leauetaking, to his mother, supposing that he should haue suffered shortly.THe Lord of lyfe and Sauiour of the world Iesus Christ, blesse you and comfort you, my good & deare mother, with his heauenly comfort, consolation, grace and spirite, now and for euer. Amen.

If I thought that dayly, yea almost hourely you dyd not crye vppon GOD the Father thorough Iesus Christ, that he would geue my hys blessyng, euen the blessyng of hys children: then would I write more hereaboutes. But for as much as herein I am certaine you are diligent, and so I beseeche you good Mother to continue: I thinke it good to write somethyng, whereby this your crying might bee furthered. Furthered it will be, if those thynges whiche hinder it, bee taken awaye. 

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As Foxe explains in a marginal gloss, Bradford is referring to the danger of stricter imprisonment for him if his letter was discovered.

Among the whiche, in that I thinke my imprisonement is the greatest and chiefest, I will thereabout spende this Letter, and that briefly lest it myght encrease the let, MarginaliaHe meaneth the daunger of more straightt imprisonment that might hereby follow. as my good brother thys brynger can tell you. You shall knowe therefore good Mother, that for my body, though it be in an house out of the whiche I can not come when I will, yet in that I haue conformed my will to Gods will, I finde herein libertie enough, I thanke God. And for my lodgyng, beddyng meat, drinke, godly and learned company, bookes, and all other necessaries for myne ease, comforte, and commoditie, I am in much better case then I coulde wishe, and Gods mercyfull prouidence here is farre aboue my worthynes. Worthynes quoth I? Alas I am worthy of nothyng but damnation.

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But besides all this, for my soule I finde much more commodity. For God is my Father, I now perceaue, thorough Christ: therefore in prisonyng me for his Gospell, he maketh me lyke to the Image of his sonne Iesus Christ here, that when hee cometh to Iudgement, I might then be lyke vnto hym, as my trust and hope is I shalbe. Nowe maketh he me lyke to his frendes the Prophetes, Apostles, the holy Martyrs and Confessours. Whiche of them did not suffer, at the least, imprisonment or banishment for his Gospell and word?

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Nowe Mother, how farre am I vnmeete to bee compared to them? I (I say) whiche alwayes haue bene, and am so vile an hypocrite and greuous a sinner? God might haue caused me long before this tyme to haue bene cast into prison as a theefe, a blasphemer, an vncleane lyuer, and an heynous offender of the lawes of the Realme, but deare Mother, his mercy is so great vpō both you and all that loue me, that I should be cast into prison as none of these, or for any such vices: but only for his Christes sake, for his Gospelles sake, for his Churches sake, that hereby, as I might learne to lamēt and bewaile my ingratitude and sinnes: so I myght reioyce in hys mercy, be thankefull, looke for eternall ioy with Christ, for whose sake (praysed be his name for it) I now suffer, and therefore should be mery & glad. And in deed good mother, so I am, as euer I was, yea neuer so mery & glad was I, as I now should be, if I could get you to be mery with me, to thanke God for me, and to pray on this sort: MarginaliaA prayer for hys mother to offer vnto God in hys behalfe.Ah good father which doest vouchsafe that my sonne being a greuous sinner in thy sight, should finde this fauour with thee, to be one of thy sonnes captaines and men of warre to fight and suffer for his Gospels sake. I thanke thee and pray

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thee
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