Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. Anti-papal writers58. Quarrel among mendicants and universities59. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
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261 [260]

K. Henry .2. things done in his time. The life and properties of K. Hēry .2.

MarginaliaThe bishop of Couentry voluntarely renounseth his byshoprike.his death renounced his byshoprike, and became a Chanon in the Church of S. Thomas, by Stafford, Ex Chronico peruetusto, cui initium. In diebus sanctis. Regis, &c.

MarginaliaS. Hugh of Lincolne.About the later tyme of this kyng Henry, one Hugo (whō men were wont to call S. Hugh of Lyncolne) borne in Burgundy, and Prior of the Monkes of Charterhouse was preferred by the kyng to the Byshoprike of Lyncolne, who after his death is sayd to do great miracles, and therfore as counted a Saint. an. 1186. Flores Hist.

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MarginaliaLambeth first began to be built.Baldwinus Archbishop of Canterbury began the buildyng of his new house and Church of Lambyth, but by the letters of Pope Clement 3. he was forbyd to procede in the buildyng therof. an. 1187. Triuit.

MarginaliaK. Henries gift to the Church of Rome for the death of Becket.I do finde likewise in the foresayd written Chronicle remainyng in the hands of one Williā Cary Citizen of London: that this forenamed kyng Hēry the. ij. gaue to the court and Church of Rome, for the death of. Becket xl. thousand markes of siluer. And v. thousand markes of gold. an. 1187.

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Mention was made a litle aboue of Amalrike kyng of Ierusalem, which destroyed Babylon, so that it was neuer after to this day restored, but lyeth wast & desolate: wherin was fulfilled that, which in the Prophetes in so many places was threatened to Babylō before. MarginaliaA worthy story of Sibilla and Guido, in Iersualem.This Amalrike had a sonne named Baldwyne, and a daughter called Sibilla. Baldwyne from the begynnyng of his reigne was a Leoper, and had the fallyng sickenes, beyng not able for feablenes of body (although valiant in hart and stomacke) to satisfie that function.

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Sibilla his sister was first maryed to one Willermus Marques of Moūt Ferrat, by whom she had a sonne called also Baldwinus. After him she was maryed to an other husband named Guido de Liziniaco, Earle of Ioppe and of Ascalon. Vpon this it befell, that the foresayd Baldwyne the Leoper sonne of Amalricus, being thus feable and infirme, as is sayd: called his nobles together with his mother and the Patriarche declaryng to them his inhabilitie, and by the consentes of them committed the vnder gouernemēt of the Citie to Guido the husband of Sibilla his sister. But he beyng found vnsufficient or els not lucky in the gouernyng therof: the office was translated to an other, named Raimūdus Earle of Tripolis. In the meane tyme the Soldan with his Sarasins mightely preuailed against the Christians and ouerran the coūtrey of Palestina. In which meane tyme Baldwyne the kyng departed. Wherby the kingdome fell next to Baldwynus the sonne of Sybilla by her first husband Willermus. The which Baldwynus beyng but fiue yeares old, was put to the custody of Raimundus aforesayd. Who also in his minoritie, before he came to hys crowne, dyed: wherby the next succession by descent fell to Sibilla, the wife of Guido aboue mētioned. To whom the peires and nobles ioynyng together in counsayle, offered to the sayd Sibilla as to the lawfull heyre to the crowne to be their Queene: with this condition, that she should sequester from her by solemne diuorsemēt the foresayd Guido her husband. MarginaliaA worthy example of a true wife to her husband.But she refused the kyngdome offered to her on that condition: till at last, the Magistrates with the nobles in generall graunted vnto her, and by their othes cōfirmed the same, that whomsoeuer she would chuse to be her husband, all they would take & obey as their kyng. MarginaliaA worthy example in Guido of a true subiecte to the cōmon wealth.Also Guido her husband with lyke petition among the rest, humbly requested her: that the kyngdome not for his sake, or for his priuate losse, might be destitute of gouernement. At length she with teares consentyng to their entreatie was contēted, and solemnly was crowned for their Queene: who after the maner, agayne receiued their fidelitie by their othe. Whereupon Guido without all hope both of wife and kyngdome, departed home quietly to his owne. This done, the Queene assemblyng her states and prelates together entred talke with them about the chusing þe kyng, accordyng to that which they had promised and sworne vnto her: and to obey hym as their kyng, whom she would name to be her husband. Thus, while they were all in great expectation waytyng euery man whom she would nominate: MarginaliaA singular example of prudence in a princes, and fidelitie in a wyfe.The Queene with a loude voyce sayd to Guido that stode amongst thē: Guido my Lord, I chuse thee for my husband, and yeldyng my selfe and my kyngdome vnto you, openly I protest you to be the kyng. At these wordes all the assembly beyng amased, wondered that one simple woman so wisely had begyled so many wise mē. And worthy no doubt was she to be cōmended and extolled for her singular vertue both of faythfull chastitite, and high prudence: so temperyng the matter that both she obteined to her husbād the kyngdome, and retayned to her selfe agayne her husband, whom she so faythfully loued. an. 1186. Ex historia manu scripta, cui initium: Rex Pictorum ex Bibliotheca Cariensi mutuata.

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As I haue hetherto decribed the publique actes of king Henry, so now I meane to touch somthyng of his priuate conditions. He was of meane stature, eloquent and learned, manly and bold in chiualry. Fearefull of the mutabilitie and chaunce of warre, more lamentyng the death of his souldiours dead, then louyng them aliue: none more curteous and liberall for the obtainyng of his purpose: in peace & tranquilitie none more rougher: stubburne agaynst the stubburne: sometymes mercyfull to those whom he had vanquished: straight to hys houshold seruantes, but liberall to straungers: publikly of publike thinges liberall, sparing of hys owne: whom once he tooke a displeasure agaynst, hardly or neuer would he receyue agayne to fauour: somewhat lauah of hys toung, a willyng breaker of hys promise, a louer of hys ease, but an oppressour of hys nobilitie: a seuere reuenger and furtherer of iustice: variable of worde, and craftie in his talke: an open adulterer: a nourisher of discorde amongest hys children. Moreouer the Papistes hearyng hym (for Thomas Beckets quarell and such like, as may be gathered) no good wyll: terme hym to be an aduersary of the fayth, the maule and beetle of the church.

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Also in the Chronicle intituled Scala mundi, I finde of hym: that he followed the steppes, maners & conditions of Henry the first hys graundfather in euery point. He preserued firme peace, and executed straight iustice through all hys dominions. He loued maruelous wel his forest: and againe those that were transgressours either to his crowne or person, he most seuerely punished.

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Moreouer, in a certayne history intituled De regibus Angliæ, I finde that this kyng was sundry tymes admonished to reforme and amende hys life. And first by one that was an olde man at the castell of Cardif in Wales, at that time of the yeare called Dominica in albis, the eyght day after Easter. Where also, after that he had heard masse, and was goyng to take hys horse: there stoode a certaine man by hym, somwhat yelowish (hys heare beyng rounded, leane, and ill fauoured) hauyng on a white coate, and being barefoote, looked vpon the kyng, and spake in thys wyse: Good old kyng. That done, thus he proceedeth. The kyng saluteth you and his blessed mother, Iohn Baptist, & Peter: MarginaliaThe kyng admonished to amende hys lyfe.straightly chargyng you, þt vpō the Sūdayes throughout all your dominions there be no bying & sellyng or other seruile busines (those onely except, which apertayne to þe preparation of meate and drinke) which thyng if thou shalt obserue, whatsoeuer thou takest in hand, thou shalt happely finish and bring to passe. MarginaliaSonday to be free from bying and selling.Then spake the king in Frēch to the knight that held hys horse by the bridle: Aske of this chourle whether he dreamed this or not. And in the meane whyle that the kynght shoulde haue interpreted the kinges wordes and message, he spake before, and sayd. Whether thys be a dreame or not, marke well what day this is: for vnlesse that thou do these thynges, and amende thy lyfe: such newes shalt thou heare wythin these xij. monethes, that wyll make thee lament and mourne, till thy dying day. And when these wordes were spoken, the man vanished out of hys sight. And wythin one yeare next after: Henry, Gawfride, and Richard his sonnes, forsooke hym their father, and tooke part wyth the French kyng. The king of Scots, the Earle of Chester, & Earle of Leciter, made an insurrection against the king. Many other premonitions also were geuen to the king, but all these dyd he little esteeme. MarginaliaThe second and; thyrd admonition to the king to reforme hys lyfe.The second which did admonishe him was a certayne Irish man, geuingg him certayne secrete signes. And thirdly, a certayne knight of Fyndesey, named Philip de Easterby: sayling wyth hym ouer into Fraunce, declared vnto the kyng in Normādy seuen articles, which he should amend. Which thyng if he would do, he should raigne seuen yeares most honorable, and should take the holy crosse from hys enemyes: or els he, in the fourth yeare should die in great ignomnie. MarginaliaSeuen thyngs to be amended.The 3. first things were those, which he at hys coronation sware to obserue (that is) to defende the Church, to maintayne good lawes, and to condemne no mā to death without iudgement. The fourth was, for the restoring of inheritaunce wrongfully taken. The fift was in doyng iustice without reward. The sixt was, of ministers and officers wages and stipends. The seuenth was, of expellyng the Iewes, leauyng them some money to depart withall. But the kyng not amendyng his lyfe: there rose vp gainst him 3. strong enemies, that is to say his three sonnes with the French kyng. MarginaliaThe kinges victory was falsly imputed to the cause of hys pilgrimage.But after that the kyng (forsoth) had gone a pilgrimage to the Martyrs tombe, barefoote: William the kyng of Scots, the erles of Chester and Leycester, were taken at Alnewick.

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MarginaliaThe death of K. Henry the. 2.In the. 35. yeare of hys raigne, beyng in the Castle of Chiuen in Normandy, he dyed: at whose death those that were present, were so gredy of the spoyle, that they left the body of the king naked, and not so much could be found as a cloth to couer it: tyll that a Page commyng in, and seyng

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