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Francis Dryland

Witness against James Bainham in 1532

At James Bainham's last examination, Francis Dryland testified against him. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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Francis Realms

Witness against James Bainham in 1532

At James Bainham's last examination, Francis Realms testified against him. 1563, p. 498; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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John Edwards

Witness against James Bainham in 1532

At James Bainham's last examination, John Edwards testified against him. 1563, p. 498; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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John Naylor

Vicar of All Hallows Barking in 1532

John Nayler was present at the last examination of James Bainham. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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John Oliver

(d. 1552) [ODNB]

BCL Oxford 1516; BCnL 1522; DCL 1522; civil lawyer; dean of King Henry VIII College, Oxford (1533 - 45); one of Wolsey's commissaries (1527 - 29); master in chancery

John Oliver was present at the condemnation of James Bainham in 1532. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1002; 1583, p. 1029.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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After Stephen Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

 
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John Ridly

Witness against James Bainham in 1532

At James Bainham's last examination, John Ridly testified against him. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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John Rudd (Rode)

(c. 1498 - 1579) [ODNB]

Clergyman and cartographer; BA, MA Cambridge by 1520; BTh 1530; anti-reformist initially; royal chaplain under Edward; married; confessed his fault under Mary; received his wife back under Elizabeth

John Rudd was present at the last examination of James Bainham. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

Rudd witnessed Anne Askew's confession in 1545. 1563, p. 673; 1570, p. 1416; 1576, p. 1207; 1583, p. 1237.

 
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Nicholas Wilson

(d. 1548) [ODNB]

Clergyman and religious activist; chaplain and confessor to Henry VIII; archdeacon of Oxford 1528; rector of St Thomas the Apostle, London 1531; active in proceedings against heretics; imprisoned (1534 - 37) until he swore the succession oath; dean of Wimborne Minster (1537 - 47)

Nicholas Wilson was present at the condemnation of James Bainham in 1532 and counselled and admonished him. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1002; 1583, p. 1029.

John Fisher, Sir Thomas More and Nicholas Wilson refused to swear an oath on the king's supremacy and were imprisoned in the Tower. Wilson eventually dissembled. 1570, p. 1200; 1576, p. 1028; 1583, p. 1056.

William Jerome preached a sermon in Lent at Paul's Cross. Wilson disputed with him. 1570, p. 1370; 1576, p. 1169; 1583, p. 1197.

 
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Ralph Hilton

Witness against James Bainham in 1532

At James Bainham's last examination, Ralph Hilton testified against him. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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Ralph Noble

Witness against James Bainham in 1532

At James Bainham's last examination, Ralph Noble testified against him. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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Richard Gill

Heard witness statements in 1532

Richard Gill was present at the last examination of James Bainham. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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Richard Grivel

Heard witness statements in 1532

Richard Grivel was present at the last examination of James Bainham. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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Thomas Wimple

Heard witness statements in 1532

Thomas Wimple was present at the last examination of James Bainham. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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William Middleton

(d. by November 1556) [Emden]

BCL Oxford 1506; DCL Oxford 1515; DCL Louvain 1524; took part in the trials of John Higgs and James Bainham

William Middleton was present at the condemnation of James Bainham in 1532. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1002; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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William Smith

Heard witness statements in 1532

William Smith was present at the last examination of James Bainham. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1001; 1583, p. 1029.

 
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Barking
NGR: TQ 445 845

A parish in the hundred of Becontree, county of Essex. 23 miles south-west from Chelmsford, and 7 miles north-east from London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Essex and Diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1053 [1029]

K. Henr. 8. The Abiuration of Iames Baynham. Iames Baynham reuoketh his abiuration.

the same: Well M. Baynham (sayd he) take your othe, and kisse the booke, or els I will do mine office agaynst you, & so immadiatly he tooke the booke in his hand and kissed it, and subscribed the same with his hand.

Which done, the Chaūcellor receiuing the abiuratiō at his hand, put him to his fine, first to pay xx. li. to the king. MarginaliaBaynham enioyned pennaunce.After that, he enioyned him penaunce, to goe before the Crosse in procession at Paules, & to stand before the preacher during the sermōs at Paules crosse, with a fagot vpō his shoulder the next sonday, & so to returne wt the Sum-

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MarginaliaIames Baynham.
Anno. 1532.
Iames Baynham enioyned Penaunce.
woodcut [View a larger version]
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This woodcut gives a rare and graphic impression of the discipline of penance, showing the guilty man standing barefoot in his white garment, holding the lit candle and symbolic bundle of faggots, while the priest presides over the ceremony and the congregation bears witness below. Bainham did not prove penitent for long and was burned only two months later.

ner to the prison again, there to abide the bishops determination: MarginaliaBaynham dismissed out of prisō.and so the 17. day of Febr. he was released and dismissed home. Where he had scarse a moneth continued, but he bewayled 

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Somehow Foxe got confused in the 1563 edition and related this story of the penitent declaration before an evangelical congregation but claimed that John Tewkesbury was the repentent sinner (1563, p. 486). This mistake was corrected in the 1570 edition.

his fact and abiuration, & was neuer quiet in mind & conscience, vntill the time he had vttered his fall to all his acquayntance, and asked God and all the world forgeuenes before the congregation in those dayes, in a ware house in Bowlane: MarginaliaRepentance of Baynham after his fall.and immediatly the next sonday after, he came to S. Austens, with the newe Testament in hys hand in English, and the obedience of a christen man in his bosome, and stoode vp there before the people in his pew, there declaring openly with weeping teares, that he had denyed God, and prayed all the people to forgeue him, and to beware of his weakenesse, and not to doe as he did. For sayd he, if I should not returne agayne vnto the truth (hauing the new Testament in his hand) this word of God would damne me both body and soule at the day of iudgement. And there he prayed euery body rather to dye by and by, then to do as he did: for he would not feele such an hell againe, as he did fele, for all the worlds good. Besides thys he wrote also certeine letters to the Bishop, to his brother, and to others, MarginaliaBaynham againe apprehended and cast in the tower.so that shortly after he was apprehended, & so committed to the Tower of London.

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¶ The proces agaynst Iames Baynham, in case of relapse. 
Commentary  *  Close

The documents from this second trial of Bainham as a relapsed heretic are from a now lost court book of Bishop John Stokesley.

Marginalia

An other processe agaynst Iames. Baynham. Ex Regist. Lond.

Anno 1532.

THe 19. day of Aprill. 1532. M. Rich. Foxford Vicar general to the bishop of London, accōpanied with certein Diuines, & Mathew Grefton the Register sitting iudicially, Iames Bainhā was brought before him by the Lieutenant of the tower, before whō þe vicar general rehearsed þe articles cōteined in his abiuration before made & shewed him a bound booke, which the sayd Bainhā acknowledged to be his owne writing, saying that it was good. Then he shewed him more of a certain letter sent vnto the bishop of Londō, þe which also he acknowledged to be his: obiecting also to the sayd Bainhā, that he had made & read the abiuration which he had before recited: showing him moreouer certain letters which he had written vnto his brother, the which he confessed to be his owne writing, saying moreouer, that though he wrote it, yet there is no thinge in the same that is nought, if it be as my Lord Chauncellor sayth. Then he asked of Bainham how he vnderstood this which foloweth, which was in his letters: yet coulde they not seenor know him for God, when in deed he was both God & man, yea he was three persons in one, the father, the sonne & the holy ghost: & Bainham sayd it was nought. MarginaliaArticles falslye depraued by the aduersaryes.Whych thinges thus done, there was further obiected vnto hym these words, that he had as leue pray to Ioane his wife, as to our Lady. The which article Bainha denied. The sayd Bainha amongst other talke as touching the sacramēt of þe alter, sayd: Christes body is not chewed wt teeth,but receiued by fayth. Further it was obiected agaynst him, that notwtstanding his abiuration, he had sayd that the Sacrament of the altar was but a misticall or memoriall body: þe which article Bainham denied. MarginaliaThomas Becket.It was further layd vnto him, that he should say, that S. Thomas of Caunterbury was a thiefe and murtherer, and a deuil in hel. Whereunto he answered thus, that S. Thomas of Canterbury was a murtherer, and if he did not repent him of his murther, he was rather a deuill in hell, then a saynt in heauen.

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MarginaliaAn other apperaunce.The 20. 

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This date was corrected in the 1570 edition. This is an indication of both the haste in which these documents were transcribed for the1563 edition and the careful correction of the text in the 1570 edition.

day of April, in the yere aforesaid, þe said Iames Bainhā was brought before the vicar generall in þe church of al saynts of Barking, where as he ministred these interrogatories vnto him. First þt since þe feast of Easter last past he sayd, affirmed and beleued, that the sacrament of the altar, was ut a misticall body of Christ, and afterwarde he sayd, it was but a memoriall: þe which article Bainham denied. The the vicar general declared vnto him, that our holy mother þe catholick church determineth & teacheth in this maner: that in the sacramēt of the altar, after the words of consecration, there remaineth no bread. The officiall asked Bainhā whether he did so beleue or not. Wherunto Bainham answered, saying that S. Paul calleth it bread, MarginaliaS Paul calleth the sacrament bread.rehearsing these words: Quotiscunque comederitis panem hunc, & de poculo biberitis, mortem Domini annunciabitis: and in that poynt he sayth, as S. Paul sayth, and beleueth as þe church beleueth. And being demaunded twise afterward what he thought therin, he would geue no other answere.

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MarginaliaTrue preachers haue as much power of the keyes as the Pope.Item, that since the feast of Easter aforesaid, he had affirmed & beleued that euery man that would take vpō him to preach the Gospel of Christ clearly, had as much power as the Pope. To the which article he aunswered thus: He that preacheth the word of God, whatsoeuer he be, and liueth thereafter, he hath the key that bindeth and looseth both in heauen and earth. The which key is the same scripture that is preached, and the Pope hath no other power to binde and to loose, but by the key of the Scripture.

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MarginaliaArticles falslye depraued.Item, that he affirmed that S. Thomas of Canterbury was a thiefe and a murderer, & in hel. Wherunto he answered as before.

Item, that he sayde he had as leue pray to Ioane hys wife, as to our Lady: the which he denyed as before.

Item, that he affirmed & beleued, that Christ himselfe was but a man, the which article he also denyed.

MarginaliaWitnes agaynst M. Baynham.The premisses thus passed, the vicar generall receiued Frances Realms, Iohn Edwards, Raphe Hilton, Iohn Ridly, Frances Dryland, and Raphe Noble, as witnesses to be sworne vpon the articles aforesayd, and to speake the truth before the face of the sayd Iames Bainhā, in the presence of M. Iohn Nayler Vicar of Barking, M. Iohn Rode Bacheler of diuinity, Williā Smith, Richard Griuel, Tho. Wimple, and Richard Gill.

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MarginaliaThe last appearance of Iames Baynham.The 26. day of Aprill in the yeare aforesayd, before M. Ioh. Foxford vicar general of the bish. of Londō, in þe presence of Mathew Greftō Register, and Nicolas Wilson, & Will. Philley, professors of diuinity, Iohn Oliuer, Williā Midleton, & Hugh Apprise, doctors of the law, M. Kichard Gresham Sheriffe of London, & a great cōpanye of others, Iames Bainham was brought forth by the Lieutenaunt of the Tower, in whose presence the vicar general rehearsed the merites of the cause of inquisition of heresye agaynst him, & proceded to þe reading of the abiuratiō. And whē the Iudge read this article folowing conteined in the abiuration: MarginaliaSoules departed.Itē, that I haue said that I wil not determine whether any soules departed be yet in heauen or no, but I beleue that they be there as it pleaseth God to haue them, that is to say, in the fayth of Abraham: & I wote not whether the soules of the apostles or any other be in heauen or no. To this Iames aunswered, that I did abiure, and if that had not bene, I would not haue abiured at all.

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After all the articles were read conteined in the abiuration, & certeine talke had as touching the sacrament of baptisme, MarginaliaThe sacrament of Baptisme. the sayd Iames Bainham spake these words: If a Turke, a Iew, or Sarasen do trust in God & keepe hys law, he is a good Christian manne. Then the Officiall shewed vnto him the letters which he sent vnto his Brother, written with his owne hand, and asked him what he thought, as touching this clause folowing: Yet could they not see and know him for God, when in deed he was both God & man, yea he was three persons in one, the father, þe sonne and the holy ghost. Wherunto Bainham said, that it

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was
VVv.iij.