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Edward North

(1496? - 1564) [ODNB; Bindoff]

1st Baron North of Kirtling (1554 - 64); brother of Joan Wilkinson

Edward North was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

Edward North was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

North was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

North was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

North was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 812

 
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John Painter

Canon of St Paul's, London, in 1547

John Painter, along with other canons and priests of St Paul's, was examined by the king's commissioners. He confessed to having had sexual relations with a married woman. 1570, p. 1501; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

 
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John Russell

(c. 1485 - 1555) [ODNB]

Courtier, diplomat. MP Buckinghamshire 1529; JP Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire, Huntingdonsshire, Northamptonshire 1533; MP Devon, Cornwall, Dorset, Somerset 1539

Henry VIII's controller of the royal household 1536; lord privy seal (1542 - 55); lord high admiral 1540

Baron Russell 1539; earl of Bedford (1550 - 55)

John Russell had been saved from danger while abroad by Thomas Cromwell and later commended him to the king. 1570, p. 1348; 1576, p. 1150; 1583, p. 1179.

John Russell was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

John Russell was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

He was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

Sir John was appointed lieutenant-general of the king's troops in the west at the time of the Western Rising. Although outnumbered, his forces defeated the rebels and captured their leaders. 1570, pp. 1499-1500; 1576, pp. 1271-72; 1583, pp. 1307-08.

George Blage had been condemned to be burnt for heresy. John Russell made suit to the king on Blage's behalf and he was pardoned. 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1246.

John Russell was present at Anne Askew's burning. 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, p. 1240.

He was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

Edward Seymour, John Russell, John Dudley and Sir William Petre visited Stephen Gardiner in the Tower at various times to attempt to get him to accept the king's reforms. 1563, pp. 766; 1570, p. 1532; 1576, p. 1306; 1583, p. 1356.

Edward Seymour wrote to John Russell, describing the conspiracy against him and asking him to bring forces to Windsor. John Russell replied, hoping for a reconciliation between the Lord Protector and his adversaries. 1570, pp. 1545-46; 1576, pp. 1317-18; 1583, pp. 1367-68.

Russell was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 814, 824-25.

John Russell was a witness in 1551 to the sentence against Stephen Gardiner and his appellation. 1563, p. 867.

 
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Richard Cluney

Bonner's summoner; keeper of Lollards Tower

Bonner wrote to Richard Cluney on the abolishing of images from churches. 1563, p. 686; 1570, p. 1481; 1576, pp. 1255-56; 1583, p. 1293.

 
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Sir Anthony Browne

(c. 1500 - 1548) [ODNB]

Courtier, diplomat; grew up in Henry VIII's court; surveyor and master of hunting, Yorkshire; gentleman of the privy chamber 1519; lieutenant of the Isle of Man 1525; ambassador to France 1527; JP Surrey 1532; contributed to Anne Boleyn's downfall; privy councillor, master of horse 1539; guardian of young Edward VI

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The bearward who had a book belonging to Archbishop Cranmer's secretary intended giving it to Sir Anthony Browne or Stephen Gardiner. 1570, p. 1356; 1576, p. 1157; 1583, p. 1186.

When Nicholas Ridley visited Princess Mary at Hunsdon, she recalled the sermon he preached at the marriage of Elizabeth and Anthony Browne in the presence of King Henry. 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1396.

During Henry VIII's final illness, Sir Anthony Browne tried unsuccessfully to get Stephen Gardiner reinstated in the king's will. 1570, p. 1478; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1291.

Sir Anthony Browne was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

 
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Sir Anthony Denny

(1501 - 1549) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Courtier, keeper of the privy purse 1542; patron of humanist letters; supported reformation; privy councillor 1547; MP Ipswich 1529, MP Herts 547; JP Essex, Hertfordshire (1547 - death)

Anthony Denny was an especially close attendant at the deathbed of Henry VIII. When others were afraid, he informed the king that he was close to death and must prepare himself. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1290.

Sir Anthony Denny was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

 
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Sir William Petre

(1505/6 - 1572) [ODNB]

Administrator; BCL Oxford 1526, BCanL 1526, DCL 1533

Privy councillor 1544; principal secretary to Edward VI

William Petre was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

William Petre was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

Thomas Cranmer, archbishop of Canterbury, Nicholas Ridley, bishop of Rochester, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May, dean of St Paul's, were commissioned to examine Edmund Bonner. 1563, p. 697; 1570, p. 1504; 1576, p. 1275; 1583, p. 1312.

Bonner was summoned to appear before the commissioners. He behaved haughtily, ridiculing his accusers and the commissioners, and spoke in favour of the mass. He appeared first on 10 September 1549 before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre and William May. Sir Thomas Smith was absent. 1563, pp. 698-99; 1570, pp. 1504-06; 1576, pp. 1275-77; 1583, pp. 1312-14.

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Bonner appeared for the second time on 13 September before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May and was further examined. 1563, pp. 699-704; 1570, pp. 1506-08; 1576, pp. 1277-79; 1583, pp. 1314-17.

The king sent Richard Lord Rich, Sir Anthony Wingfield and Sir William Petre to his sister, Lady Mary, to ensure she and her household complied with the new laws on religion. 1576, pp. 1296-97; 1583, pp. 1338-39.

Edward Seymour sent William Petre with a message to the lords opposing him, who kept Petre with them awaiting a reply. 1570, p. 1546; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

William Petre was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

Edward Seymour, John Russell, John Dudley and Sir William Petre visited Stephen Gardiner in the Tower at various times to attempt to get him to accept the king's reforms. 1563, pp. 766; 1570, p. 1532; 1576, p. 1306; 1583, p. 1356.

After Gardiner had been in the Tower for nearly a year, Sir William Paulet and Sir William Petre visited and urged him to admit his fault. Paulet, Petre, the earl of Warwick and Sir William Herbert delivered the king's letters to him. 1563, pp. 761-62; 1570, pp. 1529-30; 1576, p. 1304; 1583, p. 1354.

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When Sir William Herbert and Sir William Petre went to Stephen Gardiner in the Tower with new articles, they took with them a canon and a civil lawyer: Nicholas Ridley and Richard Goodrich. 1563, p. 768; 1570, p. 1534; 1576, p. 1307; 1583, p. 1357.

After Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

 
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Thomas Cranmer

(1489 - 1556) [ODNB]

BA Cambridge 1511; MA 1515; archbishop of Canterbury (1533 - 56); burnt in 1556

Cranmer acknowledged the help he received from John Frith's book attacking the doctrine of Sir Thomas More. 1563, p. 500; 1570, p. 1176; 1576, p. 1006; 1583, p. 1033.

Thomas Cranmer, John Stokesley, Edward Carne, William Benet and the earl of Wiltshire were sent as ambassadors to the pope to dispute the matter of the king's marriage. 1570, p. 1280; 1576, p. 1095; 1583, p. 1121.

Cranmer's separation of the king and Queen Catherine was authorised by parliament. 1570, p. 1197; 1576, p. 1025; 1583, p. 1053.

Elizabeth Barton prophesied that if the king divorced Queen Catherine and married Anne Boleyn, he would not reign more than a month thereafter. Through the efforts of Cranmer, Cromwell and Latimer, she was condemned and executed with some of her supporters. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, pp. 1054-55.

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The archbishop of Canterbury (Cranmer), along with the bishops of London (Stokesley), Winchester (Gardiner), Bath and Wells (Clerk) and Lincoln (Longland) and other clergy went to see Queen Catherine. She failed to attend when summoned over 15 days, and they pronounced that she and the king were divorced. 1570, p. 1200; 1576, p. 1027; 1583, p. 1055.

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Cranmer was godfather to Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Cranmer was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1211; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Cranmer attended a synod in 1537 with other bishops and learned men and with Thomas Cromwell as vicar-general. Cranmer opposed retaining the seven sacraments. He gave an oration to the bishops. 1563, p. 594; 1570, p. 1351; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1182.

On the second day of the synod, Thomas Cranmer sent his archdeacon to command Alexander Alesius to cease from disputation. 1570, p. 1353; 1576, p. 1155; 1583, p. 1184.

John Lambert attended a sermon preached by John Taylor at St Peter's in London in 1538. Lambert put ten articles to him questioning transubstantiation. Taylor conferred with Robert Barnes, who persuaded Taylor to put the matter to Archbishop Cranmer. Cranmer called Lambert into open court, where he was made to defend his cause. 1563, pp. 532-33; 1570, pp. 1280-81; 1576, p. 1095; 1583, p. 1121.

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Cranmer disputed with Lambert at his trial before the king. 1563, pp. 534-35; 1570, p. 1282; 1576, pp. 1096-97; 1583, p. 1122.

Thomas Cranmer alone disputed the Six Articles in parliament. 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1110; 1583, p. 1136.

The king sent Thomas Cromwell and the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Cranmer to reassure him after his opposition to the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1111; 1583, p. 1136.

Henry asked for a summary of Cranmer's objections to the Six Articles. Cranmer asked his secretary to write up a copy of his arguments against the Six Articles to give to the king.1570, p. 1355; 1576, p. 1157; 1583, p. 1185.

Adam Damplip was brought before Thomas Cranmer, Stephen Gardiner, Richard Sampson and others and examined. The next day, warned by Cranmer that he was likely to be imprisoned and burnt, he fled to the West Country. 1563, p. 657; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1194; 1583, p. 1224.

Thomas Broke, Ralph Hare, James Cocke and James Barber were sent from Calais with their accusers to England to be examined by Cranmer, Gardiner, Sampson and other bishops. 1563, p. 661; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1195; 1583, p. 1224.

King Henry wrote to Archbishop Cranmer, ordering that idolatrous images be removed from churches. 1563, p. 625; 1570, p. 1385; 1576, p. 1181; 1583, p. 1210.

For a long period, Henry VIII denied his daughter Mary the title of princess. Thomas Cranmer urged a reconciliation. 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1396.

When Claude d'Annebault, the French ambassador, went to see Henry VIII at Hampton Court, lavish entertainment was laid on for him, but he was recalled before he had received half of it. During the course of the banquet, he had private conversation with the king and Archbishop Cranmer about the reform of religion in the two countries. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

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Cranmer had sent letters for Henry VIII to sign relating to reform in the church. Gardiner convinced the king that these reforms would jeopardise a league with the king of France and the emperor, so the letters were never signed. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

The young Prince Edward wrote letters in Latin to Thomas Cranmer, his godfather. 1570, p. 1564; 1576, p. 1334; 1583, p. 1395.

Cranmer praised the learning and wisdom of Prince Edward to his tutor, Richard Coxe. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Richard Coxe wrote to Thomas Cranmer, praising the young Prince Edward. 1570, p. 1564; 1576, p. 1334; 1583, p. 1395.

When King Henry was on his deathbed, Anthony Denny asked him if he wished a spiritual adviser, and he asked for Thomas Cranmer. Before Cranmer could arrive, however, the king had lost the power of speech. He clasped Cranmer's hand, and shortly after died. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1290.

After the death of Henry VIII, the duke of Suffolk related to Thomas Cranmer how Stephen Gardiner had nearly been arrested at the time of the execution of Germaine Gardiner. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1290.

Cranmer had great difficulty in getting King Edward to sign Joan Bocher's death warrant. 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Charles V requested of Edward VI that his cousin Mary Tudor be allowed to have the mass said in her house. The request was denied, in spite of the strong urgings of Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Thomas Dobbe was brought before Cranmer, who committed him to the Counter, where he died. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

Edward VI's councillors and Edward Seymour wrote to Thomas Cranmer, directing that candles no longer be carried on Candlemas, nor palms on Palm Sunday, nor should ashes be used on Ash Wednesday. Cranmer immediately wrote to all the other bishops to inform them of the new directive. 1563, pp. 685, 691; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

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The council wrote further to Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. He wrote to Edmund Bonner, directing him to carry out the order in London. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Cranmer, with other learned bishops and learned men, was appointed to draw up a uniform order of common prayer. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

Stephen Gardiner wrote to Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley while imprisoned in the Fleet. 1563, pp. 732-54; 1570, p. 1522; 1576, p. 1297; 1583, p. 1340.

Thomas Cranmer, archbishop of Canterbury, Nicholas Ridley, bishop of Rochester, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May, dean of St Paul's, were commissioned to examine Edmund Bonner. 1563, p. 697; 1570, p. 1504; 1576, p. 1275; 1583, p. 1312.

Bonner was summoned to appear before the commissioners. He behaved haughtily, ridiculing his accusers and the commissioners, and spoke in favour of the mass. He appeared first on 10 September 1549 before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre and William May. Sir Thomas Smith was absent. 1563, pp. 698-99; 1570, pp. 1504-06; 1576, pp. 1275-77; 1583, pp. 1312-14.

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Bonner appeared for the second time on 13 September before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May and was further examined. 1563, pp. 699-704; 1570, pp. 1506-08; 1576, pp. 1277-79; 1583, pp. 1314-17.

Bonner appeared for the third time on 16 September before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir Thomas Smith and William May to answer the articles put to him at the previous session. John Hooper and William Latymer also appeared in order to purge themselves against the slanders of Bonner. 1563, pp. 704-709; 1570, pp. 1508-11; 1576, pp. 1279-80; 1583, pp. 1317-22.

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Bonner appeared before the commissioners for the fourth time on 18 September, at which session new articles were drawn up and new witnesses received. 1563, pp. 704-710; 1570, pp. 1508-12; 1576, pp. 1279-81; 1583, pp. 1317-22.

Bonner appeared for the fifth time before the commissioners on 20 September. During an interval, he instructed Gilbert Bourne, his chaplain, Robert Warnington, his commissary, and Robert Johnson, his registrar, to tell the mayor and aldermen of London to avoid reformed preachers. Bonner made his first appellation to the king. As a result of his behaviour during the proceedings, he was committed to the Marshalsea. 1563, pp. 713-717; 1570, pp. 1513-16; 1576, pp. 1282-85; 1583, pp. 1324-26.

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Bonner appeared for the sixth time before the commissioners on 23 September, when he presented a general recusation against all the commissioners and a second appellation to the king. A letter was read from Bonner to the mayor of London, Henry Amcottes, and aldermen. 1563, pp. 717-18; 1570, p. 1516; 1576, p. 1285; 1583, pp. 1326-27.

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Bonner' seventh appearance before the commissioners took place on 1 October. He presented a declaration, an appellation and a supplication to the king. The commissioners pronounced their sentence definitive. Bonner was imprisoned and deprived of his office. 1563, pp. 718-26; 1570, pp. 1516-19; 1576, pp. 1285-88; 1583, pp. 1327-30.

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Cranmer was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

After Stephen Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

 
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Thomas Seymour

(c. 1509 - 49) [ODNB]

Lord admiral (1547 - 49); MP Wiltshire 1545; privy councillor (1547 - 49); JP Berkshire, Devon, Essex, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Hertfordshire, Kent, Middlesex, Shropshire, Sussex, Wiltshire, Worcestershire 1547

Brother of Jane and Edward, duke of Somerset. Executed for treason

Thomas Seymour was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

Thomas Seymour was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Thomas Seymour worked in harmony with his brother Edward, but his marriage to Katherine Parr produced ill feeling between them. He was accused of planning to secure the crown for himself and was beheaded on Tower Hill. 1563, p. 880; 1570, p. 1545; 1576, p. 1317; 1583, p. 1367.

Thomas Seymour is given as an example of one wrongly accused and judged. 1570, p. 1360; 1576, p. 1161; 1583, p. 1189.

 
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William Paget

(1505/6 - 1563) [ODNB]

Diplomat and administrator; JP Middlesex (1537 - death), MP Buckinghamshire (1547 - death), MP Derbyshire 1547, MP Staffordshire (1547 - death); MP Middlesex 1545, MP Staffordshire 1547; privy councillor (1543 - death); clerk to the privy council 1540; clerk of the parliament (1541 - 49)

1st Lord Paget of Beaudesert (1549 - 63); lord privy seal (1556 - 58)

William Paget was one of the learned men at Cambridge supported by the Boleyns. He supported Barnes and other protestants at that time, supplying books and helping monks leave their orders. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Paget was present at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

William Paget was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

William Paget was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Paget was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

The king sent a letter to the lord mayor of London, Henry Amcottes; the mayor-elect, Sir Rowland Hill; the aldermen and common council, directing that 1000 troops be mustered to defend the Lord Protector. The lords opposing the Lord Protector had knowledge of the letter before it arrived, possibly through Lord Paget, who was then with the king and Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

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William Paget, Andrew Baynton and Thomas Chaloner were deponents in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 814-18; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

 
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William Paulet

(1474/5? - 1572) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Lord St John 1539; earl of Wiltshire 1550; marquess of Winchester 1551

Sheriff of Hampshire 1511, 1518, 1522; JP Hampshire (1514 - death), Wiltshire (1523 - death), Somerset (1531 - death), all counties (1547 - death); lord great master (1545 - 50); privy councillor 1542; lord president of the council (1545 - 50); lord treasurer (1550 - death)

William Paulet sent a letter to Princess Mary via Lord Hussey, her chamberlain, informing her she was to move her household and omitting her title. 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1395.

Paulet was one of those appointed commissioner for Calais in 1540. 1563, p. 664; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1226.

William Paulet was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

William Paulet was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to Edmund Bonner, instructing that he cease to allow private masses in St Paul's. 1563, pp. 692-93; 1570, p. 1493; 1576, p. 1265; 1583, p. 1302.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

Paulet was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

After Gardiner had been in the Tower for nearly a year, Sir William Paulet and Sir William Petre visited and urged him to admit his fault. Paulet, Petre, the earl of Warwick and Sir William Herbert delivered the king's letters to him. 1563, pp. 761-62; 1570, pp. 1529-30; 1576, p. 1304; 1583, p. 1354.

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Paulet was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 813

 
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Fleet

Prison on the east bank of the River Fleet, London

1334 [1310]

King Edward 6. The doinges of Boner in the raigne of King Edward. Boners recantation.

Essex, and Middlesexe, and enioyning them in moste effectuous manner, vnder paines therein contained, to put the same in speedy execution, and also reseruing other new iniunctions to be ministred afterward, as wel to the bishop, as to the Archdeacons aforesayd, according as they should see cause. &c. did so continue the visitation til 3. of the clocke the same day in the afternoone.

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At the whiche houre and place assigned, the Commissioners being set, and the Canons and Priestes of the sayd Church appearing before them, and being examined vpon vertue of theyr othe, for their doctrine and conuersation of life: MarginaliaNote the corrupt life of these vnmaried Priestes & Popish Votaries.first one Iohn Painter, one of the Canons of the said Cathedrall church, there and then openly confessed, that he viciously and carnally had often the company of a certaine married mans wyfe, whose name he denied to declare. In the which crime diuers other Canons and Priestes of the said church, confessed in like maner, & could not deny them selues to be culpable.

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And then after the Commissioners aforesayde had deliuered to Maister Royston Prebendary, and to the proctour of the Deane and of the Chapter of the sayde Cathedrall Churche of Sainte Paule, the kinges Iniunctions, and the booke of Homelies, enioyninge them to see the execution thereof, vnder paine therein specified, they proroged theyr sayde visitation vntill seuen of the clocke the next day following.

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MarginaliaThinges in this visitation to be noted.By this visitation aboue specified, it appeareth, gentle Reader, first howe Boner made his Protestation after the receiuing of the kings Iniunctions, and also how he after required the same to be put in publike recorde. Furthermore, thou hast to note the vnchast life and conuersation of these popish votaries and priestes of Paules. Nowe what followed after this protestation of the Bishop made, remayneth further in the sequele of the storye to be declared, wherin first thou shalt vnderstand þt the said B. shortly after his Protestation, whether for feare or for conscience, repenting himselfe, went vnto the King, where hee submitting himselfe and recantinge his former protestation, craued pardon of the king for his inordinate demeanor toward his graces Commissioners, MarginaliaBoner repenteth his euil demeanour in his protestatiō. in the former visitation. Whych pardone, notwithstanding it was graunted vnto hym by the Kynge, for the acknowledging of hys fault, yet for the euill example of the facte, it was thoughte good that hee should be committed to the Fleete, MarginaliaBoner sent to the Fleete. as by the tenoure of the Counsailes letter sente to the Commissioners, maye appeare, whych together wyth the fourme also of the Bishoppes protestation and of hys recantation, heere vnder followeth.

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To our very louing frendes Syr Anthony Cooke Knight, and the rest of the Commissioners, for the visitation at London, in haste.

MarginaliaThe kinges letter to the Commissioners concerning the recantation and pardoning of Boner.AFter our heartie commendations: This shalbe to signifie vnto you, that we haue receiued your letters, and in the same enclosed the copie of the protestation made by the Bishop of London, in the time of your visitation at Paules: your wise proceedings wherein and aduertisements from you, wee take in verye thankefull part towardes vs. And because the sayd Bishop which being heere before vs, MarginaliaBoner recāteth his protestatiō.hath acknowledged his indiscrete demeanour, did at that time at Paules require the Register of your visitation to make recorde and enter of his protestation, MarginaliaBoner requireth his recantation to be regystred.and nowe vppon better cōsideration of his duetie, maketh meanes to haue the same reuoked, as shall appeare vnto you by the true copie of his wrytinge inclosed, MarginaliaThe Copy of Boners recantation. the originall whereof remaining wyth vs he hath subscribed: wee pray you to cause the Register to make enter of this his reuocation, accordinge vnto the tenour of thys his said wryting: Further signifyinge vnto you, that in respecte of his offence, and the euill ensample that might thereupon ensue, we haue thought meete to sende him to the prisone of the Fleete, whether hee hathe bene conueyed by maister Vicechamberlaine. And whereas sundry thinges for the kinges Maiesties seruice doe nowe occurre heere, whyche require the present attendaunce of you Sir Iohn Godsaule, as well for your office of the Signet, as of the Protonoriship: we pray you, that leauing the execution of the visitation to the rest of your colleages, you make your repaire hither with conuenient diligence. Thus fare you right hartily well. From Hampton Court the 12. of Septemb. 1547.

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Your assured louing frendes.

Tho Canterbury.
William S. Iohn.
Iohn Russel.
Tho. Semer.
William Paget.
Anthony Browne.
William Peter.
Anthony Denny.
Edward North.
The forme of Boners recantation,

WHere as I Edmunde Bishop of London, at suche time as I receiued the kings maiesties Iniunctions and Homilies ofmy most dreade soueraigne Lorde, at the handes of his highnesse visitours, did vnaduisedly make such protestation, as nowe vpon better consideration of my duetie of obedience, and of the euill ensample that might ensue vnto others thereof, appeareth to mee neither reasonable, nor suche as might well stande with the duetie of an humble subiecte: for so much as the same protestation at my request was then by the Register of that visitation enacted & putte in Recorde, I haue thoughte it my duetie, not onely to declare before your Lordshippes, that I doe now vppon better consideration of my duetie, renounce and reuoke my sayde protestation, but also most humbly beseeche your Lordships, that thys my renocation of the same may be in likewise putte in the same recordes for a perpetuall memorie of the truth, moste humbly beseeching your good Lordshippes, both to take order that it maye take effect, and also that my former and vnaduised doings may be by your good mediations pardoned of the kings maiestie.

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Edmund London.

MarginaliaEx registro Petri Lilij.The Registers of these affaires of Boners, remaineth in the
handes of Peter Lillie, then beinge Register to the fore-
sayd Commissioners.

MarginaliaThe order of Boners doinges in the beginning of king Edward.Thus farre thou haste heard (louing Reader) firste the popish protestation of Boner, then how he calling himselfe home againe, solemnely recanted the same, requiringe further the sayde his reuocation to be committed to publyke Record, for a perpetual remembraunce. Also how he vpon his humble submission receiued his pardō of the king, and yet for examples sake was commanded to the Flete. Where he neuertheles did not long continue, but accordinge to the effect of the kings pardon afore graūted, was restored both to house and liuing againe: Which was in the first yeare of the king. An. 1547.

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After this yee haue heard also in the story aboue, in the second yeare, and a great part of the thirde yere of the king, howe he demeaned hymselfe, although not most forwarde in aduauncing the Kinges proceedings, yet in suche sorte, as no great aduantage by any law could be taken againste him, both in swearing his obedience to the king, and in receiuing hys Iniunctions: also in professing hys assent and consent touchinge the state of Religion then: and furthermore in directinge out hys letters, accordynge to the ArchBishop of Canterburyes Preceptes, to Cloney his Sumner, to the Bishop of Westminster and other Bishoppes, for abolishing of Images, for abrogation of the Masse, for Bibles to be set vpp, and for ministring in both kindes, with such other matters of reformation like: till at length he hearing of the death of the Lorde Admirall the Lorde Protectours brother, and after that of the sturring and rising of the kinges subiectes in sundrye tumultes agaynst the king, beganne somewhat, MarginaliaBoner beginneth to slacke in his diligence.as hee durst to drawe backe and slacke his pastoral dilligence, so that in many places of his Dioces, and in London the people not only were negligent in resorting to deuine seruice, but also did frequent and haunt forreine rites of masses and other orders, then in this Realme appoynted, and hee also himselfe contrary to his wonted maner vpon principal feastes refused in his owne person to execute. MarginaliaAnno 1549.Whereupon he being suspected and complayned of, and conuented before þe kinges Counsaile (as ye heard before) after sharpe admonitions and reproofes, had certayne priuate Iniunctions to hym enioyned.

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MarginaliaMatters put to Boner to redresse.1. First, that hee shoulde personally preache within three weekes after at Paules crosse.

2. That according as his predecessours were wont to celebrate Masse, he at such wonted tymes shoulde execute and administer the Communion.

3. That he shoulde call before him and correcte more dilligently such transgressours as absented them selues from the order of seruice and ministration of the Lordes boorde, appoynted then in Churches by the kinges ordinaunce.

4. That he shoulde see more carefully and vigilantly to the punishment of adulterers and fornicators.

5. That he in the meane while shoulde be resident within his owne house, during the time while he should make his sermon at Paules aboue mentioned, MarginaliaBoner inioyned to preach at Paules Crosse. whiche was an. 1549. In the whiche sermon certayne speciall poyntes were prefixed vnto him, whereupon he should intreate, whiche here in order follow, and are these.

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Speciall poyntes and articles to be intreated of of Boner Bishop of Lonodn, in his Sermon.

2 THat all such as rebell against their prince, get vnto thē damnation, and those þt resist the higher po-

wer
BBBb.iij.