Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ashton

Of Hill, Lancs.

He visited George Marsh when he was imprisoned in Lancaster castle. 1570, p. 1735; 1576, p. 1481; 1583, p. 1564.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lord William Dacres (of Gilsland)

(1500 - 1563)

Accompanied Mary to Westminister Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576,p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Edward Stanley, the 3rd Earl of Derby, stated that he, Dacres and Lord Windsor had never consented to the religious laws of Edward VI (1570, p. 1734; 1576, p. 1481; 1583, p. 1564).

Foxe calls him Lord Dacars.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Scot

Richard Scot was George Marsh's keeper when Marsh was detained at Lathom House. 1570, p. 1735; 1576, p. 1481; 1583, p. 1569.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Warbarton

Weaver

Thomas Warbarton was imprisoned with George Marsh in Lancaster Castle. They prayed together and recited the English litany and passages from the Bible in such loud voices that passers-by gathered underneath the window of the prison to hear them. 1570, p. 1735; 1576, p. 1470 [recte 1482]; 1583, pp. 1564-65.

[Back to Top]

[Warbarton went into exile and resided with the protestant congregation in Aarau, Switzerland; seeGarrett, Marian Exiles, p. 321].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Westby

Westby visited George Marsh while he was imprisoned in Lancaster Castle. 1570, p. 1735; 1576, p. 1481; 1583, p. 1564.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Windsor

(by 1499 - 1558)

Of Bradenham, Buckinghamshire. MP Chipping Wycombe (1529). Bencher, Middle Temple (1553). Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire (1537 - 1538). (Bindoff) Lord Windsor or Windsor (of Stanwell). Commissioner concerning heresies (1557)(DNB; Complete Peerage)

William Windsor was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Edward Stanley, third earl of Derby, stated that he, Lord Dacres and Windsor had never consented to the religious laws of Edward VI. 1570, p. 1734; 1576, p. 1481; 1583, p. 1564.

Philpot's sixth examination was before the Lord Chamberlain to Queen Mary, Viscount Hereford, Lord Rich, Lord St John, Lord Windsor, Lord Shandoys, Sir John Bridges, Chadsey and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

[NB: There is not much sign of religious conservatism in his official career but, in addition to kinsmen, he named the staunch catholics William Roper and Sir Thomas White as executors and overseers of his will (Bindoff, Commons)].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Adderton, Chaterton [Chadderton, Lancs]
NGR: SD 905 057

Unidentified as Adderton, Chaterton.

Probably Chadderton, Lancs.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Broughton
NGR: SD 525 354

A chapelry in the parish of Preston, hundred of Amounderness, county Palatine of Lancaster. 4.25 miles north by west from Preston. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry of Richmond, diocese of Chester. There is also a township of this name in the parish of Manchester, hundred of Salford, county Palatine of Lancaster.

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
1588 [1564]

Queene Mary. The examination, persecution, and imprisonment of G. Marshe martyr.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. Aprill.hath numbred the hayres of my head, and appoynted the dayes of my life saying: I am sure God which is a righteous Iudge, would make inquisition for my bloude, according as he hath promised. Then he tooke his booke frō me and departed.

MarginaliaG. Marsh caryed to Lancaster Castell.I continued still in Ward vntill Low sonday,  

Commentary  *  Close

Low Sunday is the first Sunday following Easter.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Addenda: ref page 44, bottom

- in A. D. 1554, fell on April 1st.

and after dinner my keeper Richard Scot came to mee into my chamber, and told me that two young men were come to cary me to Lancaster, and so deliuered me vnto them, a great company both of my Lordes seruauntes and others accompanying and bringing mee on the way, vnto Rich. Addertons and somewhat further, counselling and perswading like as is aforesayd.

[Back to Top]

To whome I made playne aunswere, that in matters of faith, I would geue place to no earthly creature. So they comforted me, and sayd þt they wer sory for me, saying: if I knew mine opinion to be good, I did wel, and so they departed, willing my bringers to entreate me honestly.

My bringers by the way shewed me they were willed & aduised to binde me, and that they desired first to see me: and after they had looked on me, sitting at dinner, they answered they would take charge of me beyng loose, for they sayd I seemed to be an honest man.

The first night we were all night at Broughton, and the second day we came to Lācaster betimes at after noone and so they kept me all night with them of their gētlenes, and on the morow deliuered me to þe Iaylor, who brought me into the highest prison, where I do remaine.

MarginaliaG. Marsh caused to hold vp his handes at Lancaster amongest other malefactours.After that, the sayd George came to Lancaster Castle, & there being brought with other prisoners vnto the Sessions, was made to hold up his hāds wt other malefactors. The Earle of Darby had this communication with him, as here followeth.

[Back to Top]
Communication betweene George Marsh and the Earle of Darby.

MarginaliaTalke betweene G. Marsh and the Earle of Darby.I Sayd vnto my Lord, I had not dwelled in the countrey these three or foure yeares past, and came home but lately to visite my mother, children, and other my friends, and to haue departed out of the country before Easter thē next, & to haue gone out of the realme,  

Commentary  *  Close

Given that the earl of Derby had heard of Marsh's activities in London and had determined to apprehend him, it is doubtful that Marsh's visit to Lancashire was as innocuous as he claims. Marsh was probably preaching and stiffening resistance to the religious policies of the Marian regime in the area.

[Back to Top]
Wherfore I trusted, seing nothing could be layd against me, wherein I had offended agaynst the lawes of this realme, his Lordship would not with captious questions examine me to bring my body into daunger of death, to the great discomfort of my mother but suffer me to auoyd peaceably, seeing I might haue fled out of the country, and yet of mine owne will came to hys Lordship.

[Back to Top]

He sayd to his Counsell, he had heard tell of me aboue at London:  

Commentary  *  Close

Given that the earl of Derby had heard of Marsh's activities in London and had determined to apprehend him, it is doubtful that Marsh's visit to Lancashire was as innocuous as he claims. Marsh was probably preaching and stiffening resistance to the religious policies of the Marian regime in the area.

[Back to Top]
and intended to make search for me, and take me either in Lancashyre or aboue at London, and asked me into what land I would haue gone.

I aunswered, I would haue gone either into Almain  

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., Germany.

or els into Denmarke. He sayd to his Counsell: MarginaliaThe Earle of Darby chargeth the realme of Denmarke of heresie.in Denmarke they vsed suche heresie as they haue done in England: but as for Almayne  
Commentary  *  Close

I.e., Germany.

hee sayde the Emperour had destroyed them.

So after such like woordes I sayde vnto him, my trust was that his Lordship being of the honourable Counsell of the late king Edward, consenting and agreeing to acts concerning fayth toward God and religion vnder great payne, woulde not so soone after consent to put poore men to shamefull death, as he had threatned me, for embrasing the same with so good a conscience.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe Earle of Darby, L. Windsor, and Lord Dacars in K. Edwards time agreed not to the Actes of Religion.He aunswered that he, with the Lord Windsor, & Lord Dacars, with one moe, whose name I haue forgotten, did not consent to those Actes, and that the nay of them foure would be to be seene as long, as þe Parliamēt house stode. Then my Lord did rehearse the euill luck of the Dukes of Northumberland and Suffolke with others, because they fauored not the true religion, and agayn the good hap and prosperitie of the Queenes highnes, because shee fauored the true religion, thereby gathering the one to be good and of God, and the other to be wicked and of the deuill, & said that the Duke of Northumberland confessed so playnely.

[Back to Top]
¶ George Marsh to the Reader.

MarginaliaGeorge Marsh writeth his owne examinations.FOr asmuch as not onely when I was at Latham, but also since I departed thence, I heare that there be diuers and sondry reportes, and opinions of the cause of mine imprisonment, as wel at Latham as at Lācaster (as by credible persons I am informed) some saying it was onely because I would not do open penance, and some because I could not agree with my Lord and his councell concerning the sacrament of Christes body and bloud, and the maner of Christes presence there: some because I woulde not graunt it sufficient and according to Christes institution the lay

[Back to Top]

people to receaue the sayd sacrament vnder the one kinde onely I thought it good, dearely beloued in Christe, and my bounden duetie, to certifie you by mine owne hand writing, of mine examination and handling at Latham, and to tell you the trueth as neare as I could, to quyet your minde in this behalfe, and thefore I haue here written with myne owne hand the certaynty of those thinges as neare as I could, here aboue expressed, not omitting any thing at al concerning Religion, wherof they did examine me: howbeit I perceiue in some thinges, I keepe not the same order in writing that thing which was asked by them, and answered by me afore or after, as it was in very deed in al points sauing this, telling the truth as neare as I can, desiring you to accept in good worth this my good will, and to pray for me and all them that be in bondes, that God would assist vs with hys holy spirite, that wee may with boldnes confesse his holye name: and that Christ may be magnified in our bodyes, that wee may stand full and perfect in all the will of God: to whome be all honor and glory world without end. Amen.

[Back to Top]

And thus you haue heard all the whole trouble which George Marsh susteyned both at Lathum, & also at Lancaster, testified and written with hys owne hand wherto he addeth moreouer and sayth.

While I was (sayth he) in Ward at Lathum, diuers at sundry times came vnto me. Some sayd vnto me that all my fellowes had recanted and were gone home, whereas in deede that was not so, for I saw diuiers of them dyuers times after. Other sayd that it was reported amongest my Lordes houshold, that I had consented and agreed in all things with my Lord and his counsell.

[Back to Top]

Furthermore, while I was at Lancaster, at this Sessiō time many came to me to talke with me, some of good will towardes me, but without knowledge gaue mee such like counsel as Peter gaue Christ as he went vp to Ierusalem when he tooke hym aside and began to rebuke him: MarginaliaPeters counsell to Christ, to saue himselfe.saying maister fauour they selfe: this thing shall not be vnto thee. But I answered with Christes sharpe answere vnto Peter agayne: who turned about, and sayd vnto Peter, come after me Sathan, and perceiuing that they were an hinderaunce vnto mee, and that they fauoured not the thinges which are of God, but the thinges that are of men, I made them playne aunswere, that I neither could ne would follow their counsell, but that by Gods grace I woulde both liue and dye with a pure conscience and according as hetherto I had beleeued and professed. For wee ought in no wise to flatter and beare with them, though they loue vs neuer so well, which go about to pluck vs away from the obedience that wee owe vnto God and to hys worde, but after Christes example sharpely to rebuke them for theyr counsell. MarginaliaG. Marsh followeth Christes aunswere to Peter.

[Back to Top]

Some others, yea euen straungers also, came to mee far vnlike to these, who after sober communication hadde, consented with mee in all thinges, lamenting muche my troublous estate, geuing me comfortable wordes, & some money to, and resorted to me often tymes, for the space of two three or foure, dayes. MarginaliaPriestes not alwayes the greatest Clarkes.There came also many Priestes to me by 2. 3. 4. 5. or 6. at once, whose mouthes it was a thing easy enough to stopp, for the Priests (which is much to be lamēted) be not alwayes greatest clarkes & best learned in þe lawe of God. At theyr departing they eyther consented wt me, or els had nothing to say agaynst me, saying they could finde no fault with my wordes. My communication with them was about the Sacrament. There came also into þe prison to me mayster Westby, Mayster Ashton of Hyll, M. Ashton of Chatertō, & many moe both gentlemen and others to my great comfort. Vnto whom I had good occasion to vtter a great parte of my conscience: MarginaliaG. Marsh strengthened in prison with the boldnes of Gods spirite.for God so strengthen me with his spirite of boldnes, according to my humble request and prayer before (euerlastyng thankes be geuen him therfore) that I was nothing afraid to speake to any that came to me, no not euen to Iudges, themselues, before whome I was thrise arraygned at the barre amongest the theeues wyth yrons on my feete, and put vp my hād as other did, but yet with boldnes I spake vnto them so long as they would suffer me.

[Back to Top]

They also sent for me the fourth tyme into their chamber, where amongest other thinges they layd it straitly to my charge, þt I had reported that I knew an whole messe of good gentlemen in Lancashyre of myne opinion, and straightly charged me vppon payne of allegiaunce to the Queenes grace, to shew who they were. But I denyed that I had spoken any suche thinge (as it was indeede a false forged lye of some wicked wretches.) After that, they threatned and rebuked me, for my preaching to the people out of the prison, as they called it, and for my praying and reading so loud, that the people in the streets might heare. The truth is, I and my prison fellow MarginaliaWarbarton fellow prisoner with Marsh.Warbarton, euerye day kneeling on our knees did read morning and euening

[Back to Top]
prayer
AAAAiiij.