Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bartlett Green

(1530 - 1556)

Gentleman and lawyer. Martyr. Of Basinghall, City of London. [DNB]

A letter was exhibited by Bonner, concerning the handling of Bartlett Green. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, p. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

In the letter exhibited by Bonner about Bartlett Green, reference was made to John Dee and Feckenham. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, pp. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

Foxe records Green's formative years. 1563, p. 1458, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, p. 1743, 1583, p. 1851.

Foxe discusses Green's character. 1563, p. 1458, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, p. 1743, 1583, p. 1851.

Green's thoughts on pride and gluttony were written in a book belonging to Bartham Calthorp, 20 January 1556. 1563, p. 1458, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, p. 1743, 1583, p. 1851.

Green's grandfather, Dr Bartlett, offered him great livings if he would recant. 1563, p. 1458, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, p. 1743, 1583, p. 1851.

Green wrote of his dealings with Christopher Goodman, exile, whom he had been friends with during Edward's reign. 1563, p. 1459, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, pp. 1743-44, 1583, p. 1851.

Green wrote a letter to Christopher Goodman that declared that the queen was not dead. It fell into the hands of some catholics. 1563, p. 1459, 1570, p. 2022, 1576, p. 1743, 1583, p. 1851.

Green wrote a letter to John Philpot which was not delivered. According to Foxe it was either not delivered because Philpot died or because the jailor prevented its delivery. 1563, pp. 1459-60, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, pp. 1852-53.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee [not listed here as Dr] were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Evidence on Green's doctrine was given by Welch. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, pp. 1852-53.

A discussion of scripture and civil law was planned for Bonner and Dr Dale with Green. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

A letter regarding Green's treason was sent to Bonner by the privy council on 11 November 1555 but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed by Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely, William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, pp. 1851-52.

Chedsey testified against Green, and reported that in the presence of M. Mosley and the lieutenant of the Tower Green had spoken against transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

Welch spoke privately to Bartlett Green as he feared for him. 1563, pp. 1461-62, 1570, p. 2024, 1576, pp. 1744-45, 1583, pp. 1852-53.

Bartlett Green met with John Dee, who was very friendly to him. 1563, p. 1462, 1570, p. 2024, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1853.

Green discussed eucharistic doctrine with Welch. 1563, p. 1463, 1570, p. 2024, 1576, p. 1745, 1583, p. 1853.

Foxe recounts Bonner's charges and Green's answers to the charges. 1563, pp. 1451-54, 1570, pp. 2024-25, 1576, p. 1745, 1583, p. 1853.

Foxe records Green's confession. 1563, p. 1463, 1570, p. 2025, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, pp. 1853-54.

Green was condemned with Thomas Whittle, John Tudson, John Went, Thomas Browne, Isabel Foster, and Joan Lashford. 1570, p. 2025, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, p. 1853.

Feckenham (dean of St Paul's) held discussions with Green. 1563, pp. 1463-64, 1570, pp. 2025-26, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, p. 1854.

Bonner and Pendleton questioned Green. 1563, p. 1464, 1570, p. 2026,, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, pp. 1854-55.

Green wrote a farewell verse in a book of Master Hussey of the Temple 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

Green wrote a farewell verse in a book of William Fleetwood. 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

Green was beaten and scourged by Bonner. He later told Cotten of the Temple about it. 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

Green was burned at Smithfield on 27 January 1556. 1563, p. 1451, 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 2856.

Latin verses were repeated by Green and his fellow sufferers at the stake. 1563, p. 1465, 1570, p. 2027, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1855.

John Careless wrote a letter to Bartlett Green, Thomas Whittle, Joan Warren, Isabel Foster and certain other prisoners in Newgate. 1570, p. 2107, 1576, p. 1818, 1583, pp. 1924-25.

Letters. 1563, pp. 1465-1466, 1570, pp. 2027-28, 1576, pp. 1747-48, 1583, pp. 1855-56.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward Hedge

Constable of Hockley, Essex.

Edward Hedge assisted Richard Sheriff in bringing William Tyms before Tyrrell. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Isabel Foster

(1501? - 1556)

Martyr. Born in Grafestocke, Carlisle. Wife of John Foster, of the parish of St Brides, Fleet Street.

Isabel Foster was examined and condemned by Bonner on 15 January 1556. 1570, p. 2030, 1576, p. 1750.

Foxe records Bonner's charges and Foster's answers to the charges. 1563, pp. 1451-53, 1570, p. 2030, 1576, p. 1750, 1583, p. 1857.

She was burned at Smithfield on 27 January 1556. 1563, p. 1451, 1570, p. 2030, 1576, p. 1750, 1583, p. 1857.

[Foxe also refers to her as Elizabeth Foster.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John James

Constable of Hockley, Essex.

John James assisted Richard Sheriff in bringing William Tyms before Tyrrell. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Trayford

John Gye had his coat taken from him by Tyrrell, who then gave it to John Trayford. 1570, p. 2075, 1576, p. 1790, 1583, p. 1896.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Tudson

(d. 1556)

Artificer. Martyr.

John Tudson was born in Ipswich, Suffolk. He was apprentice in London to George Goodyear in the parish of St Mary Botolph. He was complained of to Sir Richard Cholmley and John Story. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

Tudson was examined by Mr Cholmley and Dr Story. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1735, 1583, p. 1857.

He was charged and condemned by Bonner. 1563, pp. 1451-54, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1735, 1583, p. 1857.

He was burned at Smithfield on 27 January 1556. 1563, p. 1451, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Went

(1529? - 1556)

Martyr. Born in Langham, Essex.

John Went is referred to as Thomas Went. 1563, p. 1451.

He was an artificer and / or shereman. [For artificer see 1563, p. 1451; shereman: 1563, p. 1467]. He is described as shereman from 1570 onwards.

He was examined by Story and then by Bonnner. Foxe records Bonner's charges and Went's answers to the charges. 1563, pp. 1451-53, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1750, 1583, p. 1857.

While imprisoned in Lollards' Tower, he and his fellow prisoners received a letter from Thomas Whittle. 1570, p. 2019, 1576, p. 1740, 1583, p. 1848.

He was burned at Smithfield on 27 January 1556. 1563, p. 1451, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1750, 1583, p. 1857.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Sheriff

Richard Sheriff was servant to Tyrrell of Essex. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

He offered to find William Tyms for Tyrrell. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Sheriff and two constables (Edward Hedge and John James) brought Tyms before Tyrrell. 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Whittle

(d. 1556)

Priest. Martyr. From Essex.

Thomas Whittle was imprisoned in the coal house with Philpot. Bonner was so violent with Whittle's beard that he plucked much of it away and made his face black and blue. 1563, p. 1392, 1570, p. 1964, 1576, p. 1689, 1583, p. 1798.

He was apprehended by Edmond Alabaster. 1563, p. 1454, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1846.

Foxe records the bill of submission. 1563, p. 1454, 1570, p. 2017, 1576, pp. 1737-38, 1583, p. 1846.

Foxe includes Whittle's own account of his recantation and his withdrawal. 1563, pp. 1454-55, 1570, p. 2017, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846-47.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's subscription. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

Robert Johnson wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle, confirming Cluney's and Harpsfield's reports. He mentions that Sir Thomas More's submission was read to him twice to no good effect. 1563, p. 1456, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

Foxe records Bonner's charges and Whittle's answers to the charges. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

Bonner plucked at Whittle's beard so hard that it made his face black and blue. 1570, p. 1964 [marginal note].

Whittle repented after his recantation and took his subscription. 1570, p. 1964 [marginal note], pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738.

His last examination and condemnation took place on 14 January 1556. 1563, p. 1456, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846.

He was burned at Smithfield with Joan Warren on 14 January 1556. 1563, pp. 1451, 1456, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846.

John Careless wrote a letter to Bartlett Green, Thomas Whittle, Joan Warren, Isabel Foster and certain other prisoners in Newgate. 1570, p. 2107, 1576, p. 1818, 1583, pp. 1924-25.

Thomas Whittle wrote letters to John Careless, John Went and others. 1563, pp. 1457-58, 1570, pp. 2018-22, 1576, pp. 1739-43, 1583, pp. 1847-50.

1920 [1896]

Queene Mary. Tyms, Drakes, Spurge, Cauell, Ambrose Martyrs. Theyr Examination.

MarginaliaAnno 1556. Aprill.pere in many of his actes. Good God geue him repētance, if it be thy will.

Shortlye after it pleased Mayster Tyrrell to come to Hockley, to sift out this matter, and to know who was at these preachings. Well, there were found many faultes: for it is supposed there were a hundred persons at þe least. So it pleased Mayster Tyrrell to begin first MarginaliaIohn Gye M. Tyrrells seruaunt an honest man.with Iohn Gye, and asked him where that noughty felow was that serued theyr parish one Tyms: for it is tolde me (sayde he) that he is the causer to bring these noughty felowes into the coūtry. Therfore I charge thee Gye to fet me this noughty felow Tyms for thou knowest where he is. No said Gye, I doe not knowe. So in no wise he could not make him fette him.

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Then stepped forth an other of M. Tyrrels men, willing to shew his Mayster pleasure, whose name was Richard Shereffe, & sayd to his mayster: Syr I know where he is. Well said mayster Tyrrell, go to the Constables and charge them to bring him to me.

MarginaliaRichard Sheriffe, M. Tyrrells man, persecutor.So this Shereffe being diligent, made sure work, and had him brought before his Maister with the MarginaliaEdward Hedge, Iohn Iames, Constables.Constables, whose names be these, Edward Hedge, and Ioh. Iames.

So when he came before Maister Tyrrell, then Mayster Tyrrell commaūded all men to depart, & it was wisely done, for hee was not able to open his mouth agaynste Tyms without reproch, and there he kept him about three houres. But there were some that listened at the walles, and heard M. Tyrrell say thus to Tyms.

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MarginaliaTalke betweene M. Tyrrell, and Wil. Tyms.Me thinketh (sayd he) that whē I see the blessed Rood, it maketh me thinke of God?

Why Syr, sayde Tyms, if an Idoll that is made with mans handes doth make you remember God: how much more ought the creatures of God, as man being his work māship, or the grasse, or the trees that bringeth forth fruit, make you remember God.

So Mayster Tyrrell ended his talke with Tyms, it should seme in an heat, for he brast out and called him traytorly knaue.

Why Syr, sayd Tyms, in king Edwardes dayes you did affirme the truth that I do now.

Affirme, quoth Tyrrell? nay by Gods body, I neuer thought it with my hart.

Well sayd Tyms, then I pray you M. Tyrrell beare with me, for I haue bene a Traytor but a while, but you haue bene a Traytor 6. yeares.

MarginaliaTyms sent vp to London.After this Tyms was sent to Londō to the byshop, & from him to the Bishop of Winchester, and so from him to the Kynges Bench, & then was mayster Tyrrels rage seased with thē that were in the woods at the sermons. So M. Tyrrel took away Gyes coate, & gaue it to Ioh. Traiford, and sent him to S. Tosies to see good rule kept there.

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MarginaliaWill. Tyms. brought & examined before B. Boner and the Byshop of Bath.Whē Tyms came before the Bishop of London, there was at that time the Bishop of Bathe, & there was William Tyms examined of his fayth before them bothe. So mightely god wrought with this true harted man, that he had wherwith to aunswere them both, for the Constables did say that brought him before the byshop, that they neuer heard the like. Then the bishop (as though he would haue had Tyms to turne frō the truth) sayd to the Constables: I pray you (sayd he) geue him good counsell that he may turne from his errour. My Lord, sayd the Constables, he is at a poynt, for he will not turne.

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Thē both the Byshops waxed wery of him, for he had troubled them about a sixe or seuen houres. Then the Byshops began to pity Tyms case, & to flatter him, saying: Ah good felow (sayd they) thou art bold, & thou hast a good fresh spirit, we would thou hadest learning to thy spirit. I thanke you my Lordes sayd Tyms, and both you be learned, & I would you had a good spirit to your learning. So thus they broke vp, & sent Tyms to the Bishop of Winchester, and there were Edward Hedge and Iohn Iames the Cōstables aforenamed discharged, & Tyms was commaunded to the Kinges Bench, whereas he was mightely strengthened with the good men that he found there.

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And thus hitherto ye haue heard, first vpon what occasion this William Tyms was apprehended, how he was entreated of M.Tyrrell the Iustice, & by him sēt vp to the Ordinary of the Dioces, which was Rishop Boner: who after certein talke & debating he had with the sayd Tyms, MarginaliaWill. Tyms. sent from B. Boner to the B. of Winchester.at length directed him to the Bishop of Winchester, beyng then Lord Chauncellour, and yet liuing, and so was commaunded by him vpon the same to the Kinges Bench.

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Here by the way is to be vnderstanded, that Tyms as he was but a Deacon, so was he but simply or at least not priestly apparelled, forasmuch as he went not in a gown, but in a coat: and his hosen were of two colours, the vpper part white, & the neather stockes of sheepes russet. Whervpō the proud prelate sending for him to come before him,

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and seeing his simple attyre, began to mocke him saying: MarginaliaTalke betweene the Bishop of Winchester, and W. Tyms.Ah syra, are you a Deacon? Yea my Lord that I am, quoth Tyms. So me thinketh said the Bishop, ye are decked like a Deacon. My Lord sayde Tyms, my vesture doth not so much vary from a Deacon, but me thinketh your apparell doth as much vary from an Apostle.

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So then there spake one of the Bishops Gentlemen: My Lord (sayd he in mockadge) geue him a chaire, a toste, and drinke, and he wilbe lusty. But the Byshop bad, haue him away, and cōmaunded him to come before him agayn the next day at an houre appoynted.

But winchester for lacke of leasure, or because of sickenes growing vpon him, or for what cause els I know not either would not, or could not attend vnto him, but returned him agayne to his Ordinary Bishop from whence he came. So William Tyms being put of agayne to Bishop Boner, was placed together and coupled with the other MarginaliaThese 5. Martyrs were R. Drakes, Tho. Spurge, Richard Spurge, Cauell, Ambrose. Their examinations before the B. of London.fiue Martyrs aboue named, and with them brought together to publicke examination before the Bishop, the 21. day of March, first in the Bishops Palace of London: where the sayd Bishop after his accustomed maner proceeding agaynst them, enquyred of them theyr fayth vpon the MarginaliaSacrament of the Aultar.Sacrament of the aultar. To whom they aunswered, that the body of Christ was not in the sacrament of the aultar really and corporally after the wordes of consecration spoken by the Prieste, of the whiche opinion they had bene of long time, some later, some sooner, euē as God of his mercy dyd call them vnto the knowledge of his Gospell.

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Then the Bishops Chapleines began to reason with thē, but with no great authorities either of the scriptures, or of the auncient fathers (ye may be sure) as other theyr large conferences with the learned do already declare.

An other examination of Tyms and Drakes, and the rest, before the Bishop of London. 
Commentary  *  Close

This examination, first printed in 1570, is not based on official records, but was sent to Foxe by an eyewitness, William Aylesbury.

MarginaliaMarch. 23.THe xxiij. day of the same moneth next after, the Bishop sent agayne for Tyms and Drakes, and Ex officio did obiect vnto them certayne Articles, the summe and maner wherof were the same which before obiected to Whittell, Greene, Tudson, Went, Burn, Elizab. Foster, Lashford, looke pag. 1589. MarginaliaDrakes and W. Tyms with the rest agayne examined.And the 26. day of the same month, he sent for the other foure ministring vnto thē also the same generall articles. Vnto the which they all in effect answered in matters touching theyr fayth, as did þe sayd Bartl. Grene and the rest. Other appearinges they had, as the Bishops common maner of proceding was, more (as I haue often sayd) for order and forme of law, thē for any zeale of iustice.

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MarginaliaMarch. 28.But in conclusion, the xxviij. day of this Moneth of March, William Tyms and Robert Drakes with the other 4. aboue named, were brought to the open Consistory 

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Note how Foxe toned down this description. In 1563, this was the 'bloody seat of Bonner's consistory'.

in Paules before the sayd Bishop of London to be condēned for heresy.

The bishop first began in this or like sort: MarginaliaB. Boners wordes to W. Tyms.Tyms, quoth he, I will begin with thee firste, for thou art and hast bene the ringleader of these thy companions, thou hast taughte them heresies, & confirmed them in their erroneous opinions, and hast indeuored as much as in thee lyeth, to make them like vnto thy selfe. If thy faulte had not tended to the hurt of other, I would thē haue vsed thee more charitably, and not haue brought thee to this open rebuke, I woulde according to the rule of Christ in the MarginaliaMath. 18.18. of Mathew, haue told thee thy fault betwene me & thee: if thou wouldest not haue heard me, I would not so haue lefte thee, but I wyth two or thre other, would haue exhorted thee: if that would not haue serued, then woulde I haue told the Church. &c. But for that thy fault is open & manifest to the world, and thou thy selfe remainest stout in thine error, this charitable dealing is not to be extended towardes theee, I haue therfore thought good to proceed by an other rule, whereof S. Paule speaketh. Marginalia1. Tym. 5.1. Tim. 5. Such as sinne, rebuke thē openly, that other may feare. For this cause art thou brought before me in the face of this people, to receiue iudgemēt according to thy deserts. Let me see what thou canst say, why I should not proceed agaynst thee as thine Ordinary.

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My Lord (quoth Tyms) will you now geue me leaue to speake? yea quoth the Bishop. Then sayde Tyms: MarginaliaThe aunswere of W. Tyms to B. Boner.My Lord, I maruell that you will begin with a lye. You call me the ringleader & teacher of this cōpany, but how vntruly you haue sayd, shall shortly appeare: for there is none of all these my brethren, whiche are brought hither as prisoners, but when they were at liberty and out of prison, they dissented from you and your doinges, as much as they do at this present: and for that cause they are now prisoners.

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So it is euident that they learned not their Religiō in prison. And as for me, I neuer knew them, vntill such time as I by your commaundement was prisoner with them: how could I then be their ringleader and teacher: So that

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