Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
 
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Dean

Constable. Of Auborn, Lincolnshire.

Dean the constable and George Hancock the beadle searched through William Living's books and found a copy of a work by Joahnnes de Sacro Bosco [De sohera] 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

 
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George Hancock

Beadle. Of Auborn, Lincolnshire.

William Living told John Launce and others to return later, at which point Dean the constable and George Hancock the beadle searched Living's books and found a copy of a work by Joahnnes de Sacro Bosco. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

 
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John Hunt

Of Newbury.

John Hunt was one of those who witnessed Julins Palmer's second examination and made notes. 1570, p. 2121, 1576, p. 1844 [recte 1832], 1583, p. 1938.

 
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John Launce

Of Auborn, Lincolnshire. Of the Greyhound Inn.

John Launce accompanied one Cox to the house of William Living to search for heretical books and arrest Living. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

 
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John Lithal

Of unknown occupation. Originally from Staffordshire but living in London.

John Lithal was held in London for his beliefs around the time that news of Mary's sickness began to spread. 1570, p. 2266, 1576, p. 1957, 1583, p. 2063.

Lithal was brought for examination by John Avales. 1570, p. 2266, 1576, p. 1957, 1583, p. 2063.

William Living's books were in his custody at the time of Living's apprehension. 1570, p. 2267, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2063.

The constable of Southwark broke into Lithal's house while Lithal was out and removed all books and his bills of debts. 1570, p. 2267, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2063.

He was examined before Darbyshire and Avales. 1570, pp. 2267-68, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2063.

When it became clear that Mary was very ill, the proceedings against Lithal were not taken any further. 1570, p. 2269, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
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John Philpot

(1516 - 1555)

Archdeacon of Winchester and martyr. [DNB]

Foxe records Philpot's formative years and character. 1563, p. 1388, 1570, p. 1961, 1576, p. 1688 , 1583, p. 1795.

Philpot was one of the signatories to a letter of 8 May 1554 protesting against the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71).

Philpot was also one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for an opportunity to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

Philpot's account of the debate over transubstantiation was reprinted by Foxe [cf. John Philpot, The trew report of the dysputacyon had and begonne in the convocacyon hows at London the XXVIII daye of Octobre MDLIIII (Emden, 1554). STC 19890, with 1563, pp. 906-16; 1570, pp. 1571-78; 1576, pp. 1340-47; 1583, pp. 1410-17). In Philpot's version of events, he plays the lead role among the six clerics - the others were Walter Phillips, James Haddon, Richard Cheyney, John Aylmer and Thomas Young - in refuting the catholic arguments.

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John Philpot was made archdeacon of Winchester under Ponet. 1563, p. 1388, 1570, p. 1961, 1576, p. 1688, 1583, p. 1795.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Bonner sent Johnson the registrar to speak to Philpot when he was imprisoned in the coal house. 1563, p. 1392, 1570, p. 1964, 1576, p. 1689, 1583, p. 1798.

Thomas Whittle was imprisoned in the coal house with Philpot. Bonner was so violent with Whittle's beard that he plucked much of it away and made his face black and blue. 1563, p. 1392, 1570, p. 1964, 1576, p. 1689, 1583, p. 1798.

Philpot met with Bonner the second night of his imprisonment in the coal house (his third examination). 1563, pp. 1392-93, 1570, pp. 1964-65, 1576, pp. 1691-92, 1583, pp. 1798-99.

Philpot spoke briefly with Cosin, Bonner's chaplain, before returning to his imprisonment in Bonner's coal house. 1563, p. 1393, 1570, p. 1965, 1576, p. 1692, 1583, p. 1799.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

During Philpot's fourth examination, John Harpsfield brought a book by Irenaeus to Philpot's examiners, who then discussed the Roman church with Philpot. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

During his fifth examination, Philpot asked his examiners which of them could answer Calvin's Institutions, to which Saverson replied that the Genevan church had fragmented and that Calvin had fled. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Philpot's sixth examination was before the lord chamberlain to Queen Mary, Ferrars, Lord Rich, Lord St John, Lord Windsor, Lord Shandoys, Sir John Bridges, Chadsey and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

During his sixth examination, Philpot stated that Joan of Kent was a heretic. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot stated that Cheyney and Rochester could testify to what he had said under his examination. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Chamberlain was present during Philpot's sixth examination and questioned him on the real presence. 1563, pp. 1405-1412, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

In Philpot's seventh examination, John Dee is referred to as Master Dee in 1563 and 1570 and then as Doctor Dee in 1576 and 1583. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Johnson the registrar was present during Philpot's seventh examination. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Three private conferences took place between Philpot and Bonner. (The first involved his keeper; the second, his fellow prisoners and his keeper; and the third only Bonner and Philpot.) 1563, pp. 1416-19, 1570, pp. 1980-82, 1576, pp. 1706-07, 1583, pp. 1812-14.

Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

Johnson the registrar was present at Philpot's eighth examination. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Philpot's ninth examintion was before Bonner and his chaplains, including Cosin. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session to examine Philpot, and Chadsey, who had, however, left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's tenth examination was before Bonner, Johnson and others. 1563, pp. 1424-25, 1570, pp. 1985-86, 1576, pp. 1709-10, 1583, pp. 1816-17.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

In Philpot's eleventh examination, John Dee is referred to as a 'great conjurer' in 1563 and 1570. The reference is removed in 1576 and 1583. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

The bishop of Coventry and Lichfield spoke with Philpot about the nature of the true church. 1563, p. 1444, 1583, p. 1818.

Philpot's twelfth examination on 4 December 1555 was before Bonner, Worcester and Bangor. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

One of Bonner's chaplains (probably Cosin) was present during Philpot's twelfth examination. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

During Philpot's twelfth examination, Worcester told Philpot that Durham and Chichester would be coming to speak with him. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day as his twelfth examination. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, pp. 1717, 1583, p. 1823-24.

Philpot's thirteenth examination was before York, Chichester and others. 1570, p. 1996, 1576, pp. 1717-19, 1583, p. 1824-26.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

The judgement of Philpot took place in the consistory court of St Paul's on 13 and 14 of December, at which Bonner and others were present. 1570, p. 1997, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1826.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before the bishops of London, Bath, Worcester and Lichfield.. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

Foxe includes Bonner's exhortation to Philpot. 1563, p. 1443, 1570, p. 1998, 1576, p. 1710, 1583, pp. 1827-28.

A letter was exhibited by Bonner, concerning the handling of Bartlett Green. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, p. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

In the letter exhibited by Bonner about Bartlett Green, reference is made to John Dee and Feckenham. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, pp. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

Philpot was mentioned in letter sent by John Bradford to Lady Fane. 1570, p. 1824, 1576, p. 1560, 1583, p. 1642.

Lady Fane wrote a letter to Bonner. 1563, p. 1445, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, p. 1724, 1583, pp. 1828-29.

John Hooper sent Philpot and his fellow prisoners, Robert Ferrar, John Bradford and Rowland Taylor, a letter dated 6 May 1554 discussing a proposed disputation in Cambridge in which they would represent the protestants. 1570, p. 1687; 1576, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1513.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Philpot and his fellow prisoners, John Bradford, Robert Ferrar and Rowland Taylor. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500.

In a letter William Tyms wrote to 'God's faithful servants', he named his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench as Robert Ferrar, Rowland Taylor, John Philpot, John Bradford and five other Sussex men. 1570, p. 2082, 1576, p. 1795, 1583, p. 1902.

Green wrote a letter to John Philpot which was not delivered. According to Foxe it was either not delivered because Philpot died or because the jailor prevented its delivery. 1563, pp. 1459-60, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, pp. 1852-53.

Stokesley said a Latin prayer before the condemnation of Philpot. 1570, p. 2000, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, pp. 1827, 1829.

Philpot had a talk with his keeper, Alexander, during which Philpot refused to recant. 1570, pp. 2000-01, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, p. 1829.

The mayor (Macham) heard of the treatment of Philpot in prison and ordered Philpot's irons to be removed. 1563, p. 1443, 1570, p. 2001, 1576, p. 1998, 1583, p. 1830.

Wittrence, the steward of the house, carried the manacled Philpot. 1570, p. 2001, 1576, p. 1998, 1583, p. 1830.

Foxe records Philpot's behaviour prior to his death, when the sheriffs came to collect him. 1563, p. 1447, 1570, pp. 2000-01, 1576, p. 1722-23, 1583, p. 1830.

A prayer was said by Philpot at the stake. He was burned on 18 December 1555. 1563, pp. 1448-49, 1570, p. 2002, 1576, p. 1724, 1583, pp. 1830-31.

Letters. 1563, pp. 1444-50, 1570, pp. 2002-14,1576, pp. 1721-35, 1583, pp. 1829-43.

Philpot wrote a letter to John Careless. 1563, pp. 1535-38.

Careless replied to the letter from John Philpot. 1563, pp. 1536-37, 1570, pp. 2103-04,1576, pp. 1814-15, 1583, p. 1921.

Whittle sent a letter to John Careless in prison, in which he says he has heard reports of Philpot's stoutness in going to his death and asking for a copy of Philpot's nine examinations for a friend. 1570, p. 1457, 1570, pp. 2018-19, 1576, pp. 1739-40, 1583, pp. 1847-48.

[Also referred to as 'Fylpot'.]

 
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Julian Living

Wife of William Living. Of Auborn, Lincolnshire.

Julian Living was held in London for her beliefs around the time that news of Mary's sickness began to spread. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

She was examined before Darbyshire, Cluney and Dale and placed in Lollards Tower. 1563, pp. 1674-75, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1957, 1583, pp. 2063-64.

She was delivered by the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1957, 1583, p. 2063.

 
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Rawlins White

(1495? - 1555)

Fisherman, martyr

In the 1563 edition there is only one sentence about Rawlins White; it states that he was burned on 5 March 1555 in Cardiff. 1563, p. 1101.

White was converted to protestantism in the reign of Edward VI and became an itinerant lay preacher. He headed conventicles in Mary's reign in the region around Cardiff. 1570, p. 1726; 1576, pp. 1473-80 [recte 1474]; 1583, pp. 1556-57.

After being imprisoned for three weeks after sentence was pronounced, White was burned in Cardiff in March 1555. He died with remarkable courage. 1570, pp. 1727-29; 1576, p. 1463 [recte 1475]-1476; 1583, pp. 1558-59.

 
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Richard Cluney

Bonner's summoner. Keeper of Lollards Tower.

Cluney witnessed the degradation of John Hooper and John Rogers on 4 February 1555. 1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508. [NB: Described as a bell ringer in 1563, p. 1058, but this was changed to summoner in later editions.]

Bonner's writ for the excommunication of John Tooley was sent to Cluney. 1563, p. 1143; 1570, p. 1757; 1576, p. 1501; 1583, p. 1582.

Robert Johnson wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle, confirming Cluney's and Harpsfield's reports. He mentioned that Sir Thomas More's submission was read to him twice to no good effect. 1563, p. 1456, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's subscription, in which he mentioned Cluney's report. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

Margery Mearing was talking with a friend when she saw Cluney, Bonner's summoner, making his way to her house. Cluney took her away to be examined. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Cluney took William Living to his own house, robbed him, and then took him to Bonner's coalhouse and put him in the stocks. Cluney eventually brought him meat and then took him to Darbyshire who presented him with a list of names. Cluney took Julian Living to Lollards Tower. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

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John Fetty was taken by Richard Tanner and his fellow constables to Sir John Mordaunt who then sent him to Cluney, Bonner's summoner, who sent him to Lollards Tower and put him in the stocks. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2257, 1576, p. 1949, 1583, p. 2056.

The chaplains had Cluney take William Fetty to his father in Lollards Tower. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

The child told his father what had happened, at which point Cluney seized the child and returned him to Bonner's house. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

Thomas Green was transferred quickly from Lollards Tower to the coalhouse by Cluney and then put in the stocks. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

After examination, Cluney removed Green to prison again, first to the coalhouse and then the salthouse. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Cluney delivered Green to Trinian, the porter of Christ's hospital, where he was thrown into the dungeon. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

After Elizabeth Young's sixth examination, Darbyshire called on Cluney to take her away. Cluney took her to the stockhouse, where she was kept in irons, and then to Lollards Tower, where she was kept in stocks and irons. 1570, p. 2273, 1576, p. 1962, 1583, p. 2069.

Alexander Wimshurst was sent to Cluney's house in Paternoster Row, where he was to be carried forward to Lollard's Tower, but Cluney, his wife and maid had no time to lock up Wimshurst as they were extremely busy. When Wimshurst was left alone in Cluney's hall, a woman came to him and told him this was his chance to escape, which he took. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

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Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

[Foxe occasionally refers to him as 'Richard Cloney'.]

 
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Thomas Darbyshire

(1518 - 1604)

Nephew of Edmund Bonner. Jesuit. DCL (1556). Prebend of Totenhall (1543), Hackney (1554). Rector of Fulham (1558) and St Magnus, near London Bridge (1558). Principal of Broadgates College, archdeacon of Essex (1558). Chancellor of London. Deprived of all preferments under Elizabeth. (DNB; Foster)

Darbyshire told Thomas Hawkes that the Bible was sufficient for salvation, but not instruction. 1563, p. 1149; 1570, p. 1759; 1576, p. 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, p. 1586

On 6 June 1556, Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor, read articles against Henry Adlington, Thomas Bowyer, Lyon Cawch, John Derifall, Agnes George, William Halliwell, Edmund Hurst, Ralph Jackson, Lawrence Parnam, Elizabeth Pepper, John Routh, George Searles, and Henry Wye. 1563, p. 1524, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1914.

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

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Five who were martyred at Smithfield on April 12 1557 were first examined by Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor. 1563, pp. 1567-70, 1570, pp. 2159-61, 1576, pp. 1865-67, 1583, pp. 1974-76.

Ralph Allerton was examined on 7 July by Darbyshire. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

Articles against six martyred at Brentford were administered by Thomas Darbyshire on 20 June 1558. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2042.

Darbyshire examined William Living and his wife. 1563, p. 1673.

Sentence against them was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Edward Hastings and Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

 
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William Living

Minister. Of Auborn, Lincolnshire.

William Living was held in London for his beliefs around the time that news of Mary's sickness began to spread. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

He was visited by Cox the promoter in the company of John Launce of the Greyhound Inn. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

William Living told John Launce and others to return later, at which point Dean the constable and George Hancock the beadle searched Living's books and found a copy of a work by Joahnnes de Sacro Bosco. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Living and his wife were arrested and taken from Shoe Lane through Fleet Street to St Paul's Churchyard and thence to Darbyshire's house. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Living had a talk with Darbyshire. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Living said that he was made a minister at Aubourn. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

He was put in the stocks at Lollard's Tower and had his leg in the same hole that John Philpot had. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Cluney eventually brought him meat and then took him to Darbyshire who presented him with a list of names. Living said he only knew Foster's name on the list. He was ordered to pay 15 shillings to Cluney. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Living was delivered by the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

 
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Oborne
Obourne
NGR: ST 656 185

A parish in the hundred of Sherbourne, Sherbourne division of the county of Dorset. 1.25 miles north-east by east from Sherbourne. The living is a discharged vicarage in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean of Salisbury

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2087 [2063]

Queene Mary. Diuers saued by Gods prouidence from the fire, in Queene Maries dayes.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.faithfull seruauntes both men and women, and that of all ages and degrees, to fall into the enemies handes, and to abide the brunt of this persecution, to be tried with rods, with whippes, with rackes, with fetters and famin, with burning of handes, with plucking of beardes, wyth burning also both hand, beard, and body. &c.

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MarginaliaA treatise of Gods mercy and prouidence in preseruing good men & women, in the tyme of this persecution.Yet notwithstāding some there were againe, and that a great number, who myraculously by the mercifull prouidence of God, against all mannes expectation, in safetie were deliuered out of the fiery rage of this persecution, either by voydinge the Realme, or shiftinge of place, or the Lord so blinding the eyes of the persecutors, or disposing the oportunitie of time, or woorking some suche meanes or other for hys seruauntes, as not onely ought to stir them vp to perpetuall thanckes, but also may mooue all menne both to beholde and magnifie the wonderous woorkes of the almightie.

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About what time it began to be knowen that Queene Mary was sicke, diuers good men were in hold in diuers quarters of the realme, some at Burie, some at Salisb. as Iohn Hunt and Richard White, of whome we haue storied before, and some at London, amongest whome was Wil. Liuing with hys wife, and Iohn Lithall, of whome something remaineth now compendiously to be touched.

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The trouble and deliueraunce of William Liuing with his wife, and of Iohn Lithall, Ministers.

MarginaliaThe deliuerance of W. Liuing, his wyfe and of Iohn Lithall.ABout the time of the latter end of Queene Marie, she then beinge sicke, came one Coxe a Promoter, to the house of William Liuing, about 6. of the clocke, accompanied with one Iohn Launce of the Graihound. They being not ready, they demaunded for buttons, sayinge they shoulde be as well payed for them, as euer was any: and he would come about 3. houres after againe for them.

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In the meane while he had gotten the MarginaliaDeane Constable, George Hancocke Beadle, persecutors.Constable called maister Deane, and George Hancocke the Beadle of that Ward, and searching his bookes, founde a booke of Astronomie, called the worke of Ioannes de sacro busto de sphæra,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 528, middle

The first Edition appeared at Venice in 1478, and reprints in the following century were rather numerous. The author's English name, who flourished about 1231, was Halifax. See Dibdin's Biblioth. Spencer. iii. 501; Panzer's Annall. Typogr. vii. 145, 525, &c.; and Fabricii Biblioth. mediæ et inf. Latin. tom. iv. 129; who says of it, "Innotuit potissimum Sacroboscus libro decantatissimo de Sphæra Mundi, quem prælectum in Scholis per 400 amplius annos universa legit et trivit tironum Astronomiæ natio." He was a different individual from Jacobus Manlius de Bosco, who wrote "Luminare majus."

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with figures, some round, some triangle, some quadrate: which booke because it was gilted, seemed to him the chiefest booke there, and that he caried open in the streate, saying: I haue founde him at length. It is no maruaile the Queene be sicke, seeing there be suche coniurers in priuie corners: but now I trust he shall coniure no more, and so brought him and his wife from Shoe lane through Fleet streete into Paules Churchyarde, with the Constable, the Beadle, and 2. other following them, til they were entred into Darbishires house, who was bishop Boners Chancellour: And after the Constable and they had talked wyth Darbishire, he came foorth and walked in his yard, saying these woordes.

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MarginaliaTalke betweene Darbyshire and W Liuing, Priest.Darbishire. What is your name?

Liuing. William Liuing.

Darb. What are you? a Priest?

Liuing. Yea.

Darb. Is this your wife that is come with you?

Liuing. That shee is.

Darb. Where were you made Priest?

Liuing. At Obourne.

Darb. In what Bishops daies?Liuing. By the Bishop of Lincolne, that was king Henries ghostly father in Cardinall Wolsies time.

Darb. You are a schismaticke and a traytor.

Liuing. I would be sorie that were true. I am certaine I neuer was traitor, but alwais haue taught obedience, according to the tenour of Gods woord: and when tumults and Schismes haue beene stirred, I haue preached Gods word, and swaged them, as in the time of king Edwarde.

Darb. What? you are a Schismaticke. You be not in the vnitie of the catholike church: for you pray not as þe church of Rome doth: You pray in English.

Liuing. We are certaine we be in the true church.

Darb. There be that doubteth therof, for so much as there is but one true Church.

Well, you will learne against I talke with you againe, to know the church of Rome, and to be a member thereof.

Liuing If the church of Rome be of that Churche whereof Christ is the head, then am I a member thereof: for I know no other Church but that.

Darb. Wel Cluny, take him with thee to the Colehouse.

MarginaliaCluny playeth the theefe.Then called he Cluny again, and spake secretly to him, what I know not.

Then sayde Cluny: wilt thou not come: and so pluckt me away violently, and brought me to his owne house in Pater noster Rowe, where hee robbed me of my pursse, my girdle, and my Psalter, and a new Testamēt of Geneua, 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 529, line 13

This New Testament, neatly printed in duodecimo in Roman and Italic types, consists of 456 leaves, including the title: "The Newe Testament of our Lord Jesus Christ, conferred diligently with the Greke and best approved translations. - At Geneva, printed by Conrad Badius, M. D. LVII." It is a beautiful book, and now of rare occurrence, printed with a silver type, and on the best paper; by far the best review of the sacred text that had yet been made.

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and then broughte me to the Colehouse to put mee in the stockes, saying: put in both your legges and your handes also: and except you fine wt me, I will put a collor about your necke. What is the fine, quoth I? Fortie shillinges quoth he, I am neuer able to pay it, sayd I.

MarginaliaNote the couetous dealing of these Papistes.Then said he: you haue friendes that be able. I denyed it: and so he put both my legges into the stockes til supper time, whyche was 6. of the clocke, and then a cosine of my wiues brought me meat, who seeing me so sit there, sayd: I will geue you 40. pence and let him goe at libertie: and he tooke her mony, and presently let me forth in her sighte, to eate my supper. And at 7. of the clocke he put mee into the stockes againe, and so I remained till 2. of the clocke the next day, and so he let mee foorth till nighte. This woman aboue mentioned, was Griffins first wife, 

Commentary  *  Close

Dorothy Griffin had also refused to attend church in Mary's reign because her conscience forbade her (Susan Brigden, London and the Reformation [Oxford, 1989], p. 564).

a brother dwelling then in Aldermanberie, and yet aliue in Chepeside.

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MarginaliaW. Liuing layd in the Lollardes tower.The thursday following at afternoone was I called to the Lollardes tower, and there put in the stockes, hauing the fauour to put my legge in that hole that Master Iohn Philpots legge was in, and so lay all that night, no body comming to me, either with meat or drinke.

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At 11. of the clocke on the Fridaye, Clunie came to mee with meat, and let me forth, and about one of the clocke he brought me to Darbishires house, who drew forth a scroll of names, and asked me if I knew none of them, I said I know none of them, but Foster. And so I kneeled downe vpon my knees, and praied him that he wold not enquire thereof any farther. MarginaliaWilliam Liuing deliuered.And with that came foorth two godly women, which sayd: Master Darbishire, it is inough, and so became sureties for mee, and paied to Clunie xv. s. for my fees, and bad me goe with them.

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And thus muche concerning William Liuing. After this came his wife to examination, whose answeares to Darbishire the Chancellor, here likewise follow.

The examination of Iulian Liuing, wife to William Liuing.

MarginaliaTalke betweene Darbyshire & Liuinges wyfe.DArbishire. Ah syrha: I see by your gowne you be one of the Sisters.

Iulian. I weare not my gowne for Sisterhood, neither for nunnerie, but to keepe me warme.

Darb Nunne? No I dare say you be none, Is that man your husband?

Iulian. Yea.

Darb. He is a Priest.

Iulian. No, he sayeth no Masse.

Darb. What then? He is a priest. How darest thou marry him.

Then he shewed me a rolle of certaine names of Citizens. To whom I answeared, I knew none of them.

Then sayd he: you shall be made to know them.

Then said I: do no other but Iustice and right, for the day will come that you shall answere for it.

Iulian. Why womā, thinkest thou not that I haue a soul.

Iulian. Yes, I knowe you haue a soule: but whether it be to saluation or damnation, I can not tell.

MarginaliaLiuinges wyfe commaunded to the Lollardes Tower.Darb. Ho Cluny haue her to the Lollardes tower. And so he tooke me, and caryed me to his house, where was one MarginaliaDale a Promotor.Dale a Promoter, which sayde to me: Alas good woman, wherefore be you heere.

What is that to you sayd I?

You be not ashamed, quoth Dale, to tel wherfore you came hither.

No quoth I, that I am not: for it is for Christes Testament.

Christes Testament, quoth hee? it is the Deuils Testament.

Oh Lorde, quoth I, God forbid that any man shoulde speake any such woorde.

Well, well quoth he, you shall be ordered wel enough. You care not for burning quoth he. By Gods bloud, there must be some other meanes founde for you.

What quoth I, will you find any worse then you haue founde?

Wel quoth he, you hope and you hope: but your hope shalbe a slope. MarginaliaMarke the hope of the Papistes.For though the Queene faile, shee that you hope for, shall neuer come at it: For there is my lord Cardinals grace, and many more betweene her and it.

Then quoth I: my hope is in none but God.

Then saide Clunye: Come with me: and so went I to the Lollardes Tower. On the next daye Darbishire sent for me againe, and enquired againe of those Citizens that he enquired of before.

I answeared I knewe them not.

Where were you, quoth he, at the communion on son-

day