Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cuthbert Scott

(d. 1569)

Bishop of Chester (1556 - 1559) (DNB); master of Christ's College, Cambridge (1553 - 1556) (Venn)

Cuthbert Scott was appointed to debate with Latimer in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, p. 934).

He was one of the official disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 936-38; 1570, pp. 1591-92; 1576, pp. 1358-59; 1583, pp. 1428-30).

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570].

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Cuthbert Scott was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Scott responded to John Stokes' oration at Cambridge University on 11 January 1557. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2144, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1958.

Brassey again excused himself at St Mary's church on 12 January 1557. Scott answered his words. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1958.

Scott, Watson and Christopherson interdicted St Mary's Church, Cambridge, where Bucer was buried.1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 1959.

On 14 January 1557, after the examination of the provost and vice-provost of Cambridge, Thomas Bacon invited Perne, Dr Young, Dr Harvey, Swinborne, and Maptide to come to dinner. He was examined before Scott, Watson and Christopherson on 14 January 1557. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

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Scott spoke with Nicholas Carre, as a former pupil of Bucer, about the heresies of Bucer. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Carre denounced Scott's opinion of Bucer and sent him into a rage, berating Carre for his words at Bucer's burial. Scott desisted when no one presented any evidence against Carre's actions. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Scott made an oration at the condemnation of Bucer and Phagius. 1570, p. 2148, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1961.

The condemnation of Bucer was given the bishop of Chester's seal. 1570, p. 2148, 1576, p. 1868, 1583, p. 1961.

John Hullier appeared before Shaxton, Young, Segewick, Scott, Mitch and others on Palm Sunday eve at Great St Mary's. 1570, p. 2196, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2004.

Dr Dakins was given commission by the bishop of Chester to examine John and Richard Snell. 1570, [unnumbered sheet at beginning of volume 1], 1576, 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

Cuthbert Scott was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Scott was in the Fleet but escaped to Louvain and died there. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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Dakins

Of Cheshire.

Dakins received permission from the bishop of Chester to examine prisoners in Bedale, Yorkshire. 1570, [unnumbered sheet at beginning of volume 1], 1576, p. 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

He condemned Snel of Bedale. 1570, [unnumbered sheet at beginning of volume 1], 1576, p. 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

[Possibly John Dakyns, BA (1546)]

 
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Hillings

Commissary of Richmond, Yorkshire.

Hillings took part in the examination of Snel. 1570, [unnumbered sheet at beginning of volume 1], 1576, 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

He preached at Snel's burning in Richmond. 1570, [unnumbered sheet at beginning of volume 1], 1576, 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

 
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Laremouth

Chaplain to Anne of Cleves. A Scot. Possibly friar of Montrose. [Fines]

Laremouth was imprisoned for his beliefs under Mary. Whilst at prayer he heard a voice telling him to leave, at which point the wall of the prison collapsed and allowed him to escape. 1570, [unnumbered sheet at the front of volume 1], 1576, p. 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

[Alias Williamson]

 
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Robert Atkinson

Of Richmond, Yorkshire.

Robert Atkinson witnessed the martyrdom of one Snel. 1570, [unnumbered sheet at beginning of volume 1], 1576, 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

Snell"> 
Snell">
Person and Place Index  *  Snell')"> Close

Martyr. Of Bedale, Yorkshire

Snell was accused of heresy and condemned by Dr Dakins. 1570, [unnumbered sheet at beginning of volume 1], 1576, 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

He was burned at Richmond, Yorkshire. [Foxe does not say what year.] 1570, [unnumbered sheet at beginning of volume 1], 1576, 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

 
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William Hunter

(d. 1555)

Weaver's apprentice and martyr

William Hunter refused to attend mass in London in 1553; he returned home to Brentwood, Essex. 1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1462; 1583, p. 1536.

He was denounced to Thomas Wood, the vicar of South Weald, for reading scriptures in English. He was examined by Wood, who denounced William Hunter to Anthony Browne. 1570, p. 1713; 1576, p. 1462; 1583, p. 1536.

Hunter was brought before Browne and interrogated; Hunter was then sent to Bonner by Browne. 1570, pp. 1713-14; 1576, pp. 1462-63; 1583, pp. 1536-37.

William Hunter was examined by Bonner and condemned. 1563, p. 1110. [NB: This account of Hunter's examinations, based on Bonner's registers, was replaced in subsequent editions by a more detailed account of Bonner's treatment of Hunter.]

Hunter was detained by Bonner for nine months, during which time the bishop tried both harsh and lenient treatment to persuade him to recant. Finally he condemned Hunter. 1570, pp. 1714-15; 1576, pp. 1463-64; 1583, pp. 1537-38.

Foxe mentions that Hunter was examined by Bishop Bonner on 8 February 1555; he was condemned by Bishop Bonner on 9 February 1555. 1570, p. 1705; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

William Hunter was sent to Brentwood to be burned. Hunter refused pressure at his execution to recant and died constantly on 26 March 1555. 1563, p. 1110; 1570, pp. 1715-16; 1576, p. 1464; 1583, pp. 1538-39. [NB: The date of Hunter's execution is given as 25 March in the 1563 edition; this is corrected in subsequent editions.]

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Hunter wrote a short letter to his mother shortly before his martyrdom. 1583, p. 2149.

 
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Bedale
Bedaile, Bedel
NGR: SE 266 883

A parish comprising the market town of Bedale, 4 townships and one hamlet, in the Eastern division of the wapentake of Hang, also one township in the wapentake of Hallikeld, North Riding of Yorkshire. 33.5 miles north-west from York. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Richmond, diocese of Chester.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Richmond, Yorks
Richmond
NGR: NZ 175 101

A borough, market town and parish, having separate jurisdiction, but locally in the western division of the wapentake of Gilling, North Riding of the county of York. 44 miles north-west from York. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Richmond, diocese of Chester

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2173 [3150]

The story of one Snell and Laremouth, omitted in the body of this history.

it. Then when he had long vsed his foolishnes in this sort and had sported himselfe enough in deriding this chrysten martyr: in the end sent her to prison agayn, and there kept her very miserably, sauing sometimes he woulde send for her, when hys foresayd gest came to him, to vse with her his accustomed folly aforesayd. But in fine, the vile wretches (after many combattes, and scoffing, perswasions) when they had played the parte of a cat with a mouse at length they condemned her & deliuered her ouer to the secular power, who within shorte space after most cruelly brought her forth to the place where she should suffer, and there in great contempt of the truth (which she most constantly confessed) they consumed her carcas immediately with fire into ashes: which she very paciētly suffered, and most ioyfully receiued, yelding her soule and lyfe to the Lord, and her body to the tormentors, for the whiche the Lordes name therefore be praysed, Amen.

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¶ The martirdome of one Snel, burned about Richmond in Queene Maryes tyme, omitted in this history. 
Commentary  *  Close

The stories of Snel and Laremouth must have reached Foxe just as the 1570 edition was being published. They were inserted before the title page of the 1570 edition and then transferred to the end of the 1576 edition. These stories were then reprinted in the appendix to the 1583 edition.

MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of one Snel by Richmond.AT Bedaile a market towne in Yorkshyre, were two men in the latter dayes of Queene Mary, the one named Iohn Snel, and the other Richard Snel. Who being suspected for Religion, were sent vnto Richmond, where Doctor Dakins had commission from the Bishop of Chester to haue the examination of them.

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This Doctor Dakins many times conferred wyth them, sometimes threatning fire and fagot if they woulde not recant, and sometimes flattering them with fayre fables if they would returne into the holy catholick church. But they stood constantly to the sure rocke Iesus Christ, in whome they put theyr whole trust and confidence, whiles at last being so sore imprisoned that theyr toes rotted of, and the one of them could not go without crouches they brought thē to the church by compulsion, where the one of them heard their abhominable Masse, hauing a certaine summe of mony geuen him by the beneuolence of the people, and so departed thence: but the first newes that was heard of hym within three or foure dayes was that he had drowned him self in a riuer running by Richmond called Swaile.

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MarginaliaGods punishment vpon the Doctour that condemned Snel.Immediately after D. Dakins geuing sentence that þe other should be burnt, came home to hys house and neuer ioyed after, but dyed. The Commissary of Richmond named Hillinges, preached at his burning, exhorting him to returne to the Churche, but hys labour was in vayne, the constant martyr standing strongly to the fayth which hee professed.

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Then being brought to the stake, whereunto hee was tyed by a girdle of iron, there was geuen vnto him gunpouder and a little straw was layd vnder his feete, and set round about with smale woode and tarre barrels, the fire was put in the straw, which by and by flamyng about his head, he cryed thrise together: Christ helpe me: Insomuch that one Robert Atkinson being present, sayde: hold fast there & we wil all pray for thee. Thus this blessed martyr ended his life.

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¶ A story of one Laremouth, omitted in the body of the story.

ALbeit I am loth to insert any thing in this booke which may seeme incredible or strange to ordinary working for quarelling aduersaryes, whiche doe nothing but spye what they may cauill: yet forsomuch as besides other reporters the person is yet aliue, called Thorne a godly minister, which heard it of the mouth of the party himselfe, I thought therefore first for the incredible strangnes therof neither to place this storye in the bodye of these Actes and Monumentes, and yet in some outcorner of the booke not vtterly to passe it vntouched, for the reader to consider it, and to credite it as he seeth cause. The story is this.

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MarginaliaThe marueilous deliueraunce of one Laremouth.There was one Laremouth, otherwise called Williamson, Chaplayne to Lady Anne of Cleue, a Scotishman, to whome being in prison in Queene Maryes daies, it was sayd, as he thought, thus sounding in hys eares: arise and go thy wayes. Whereunto when he gaue no great heed at the first, the second time it was sayd to him agayne in the same wordes. Vpon this as he fell to his prayers, it was sayd the thyrd time likewise to him, arise and go thy way, which was about halfe an houre after. So he arising vpon the same, immediately a peece of the prison wall fell downe, and as the officers came in at the outwarde gate of the Castle or prison, he leaping ouer the ditche escaped, and in the way meeting a certayne beggar, chaunged hys cote with him, and comming to the Sea shore, where hee

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found a vessell ready to go ouer was taken in, and escaped the search, which was straytly layd for hym in all the coūtry ouer.

¶ A little short letter of William Hunter sent out of prison to his mother a little before hys martirdome, to be referred and placed in his story, pag. 1538.

MarginaliaA letter of William Hunter to his mother a little before his burning.MOst reuerent & louing mother, after my most humble wyse I haue me harty commēded vnto you, desiring you to pray vnto God most hartely for me, that I may haue his blessing and yours, the which I esteeme more worth vnto me, thē any worldly treasure. In this present letter you shall vnderstand the cause of my writing vnto you at this tyme, that I am in good health and prosperitie, as euer I was in this present life. Wherefore I render thankes vnto almightye God for it, who alone is moste woorthye of all prayse, trusting in God you bee in health also. Furthermore I certifie you wherefore my father continueth here, to the intent to heare some godly and ioyfull tidynges, both for soule and body, which I trust it shalbe to you singular comfort and consolation, and to the great reioysing of all other of my frendes. Therefore I desire you, gentle mother to admonish my brother vnto a godly life, with dilligent attendance and to pray for me, considering his bound duety, that God may by your faythfull prayer, ayd and strengthen me in this my prosperous iourney and course, whiche I run trusting to obtayne a crowne of euerlasting life, whiche doth euer endure.

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No more vnto you at this time, but God preserue
you vnto euerlasting life. So be it.

¶ The Oration in effecte of Sir Nicholas Bacon Knight, Lord Keeper of the great Seale of England spoken in the Starre Chamber the 29. of December in the 10. yeare of the reigne of our Souereigne Lady Elizabeth by the grace of God of England, Fraunce, and Ireland Queene, Defender of the fayth &c. And in the yeare of our Lord God. 1567. Then being present.

Mathew, Archbishop of Caunterbury.
William, Marques of Northampton.
Fraunces, Earle of Bedford.
Lord Clinton, Admirall of England.
William Howard, Lord Chamberleyne.
Byshop of London.
Lord Gray of Wilton.
Sir Edward Rogers Knight, Controler.
Sir Ambrose Caue Knight, Chanc. of the duchy.
Sir William Cicill Knight, principall Secretary.
Sir Fraunces Knolles Knight, Vicechamberleyne.
Sir Walter Mildemay Knight, Chauncelor of the
Eschequer.

Lord Cattelene 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 738, fn 1

Robert Catlin, made chief justice, anno 1559. - ED.

chiefe Iustice of the kings bench.
Lord Dyer 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 738, fn 2

Sir James Dyer, knt. - ED.

chiefe Iustice of the common place.
Sir William Cordale Knight, M. of the Rolles.
Iustice Weston.
Iustice Welch.
Iustice Southcotes.
Iustice Carowes.

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IT is geuen to the Queenes Maiestye to vnderstand that certayne of her Subiectes by theyr euill dispositions do sow and spread abroad diuers sedicions to the derogation and dishonor, first of almighty God, in the state of Religion stablished by the lawes of this Realme and also to the dishonor of her highnesse in disprouing her lawfull right of supremacy amongest her subiectes. And this that they doe, is not done as in secrecy or by stealth, but openly auouched, & in all companyes disputed on. And thus by theyr bold attemptes seme not to obey or regard the authority of lawes nor the quiet of her subiectes. As for example, by bringing in and spreading abroad diuers leud libels and sedicious bookes from beyonde the seas, and in suche boldnes that they do commend those writers in their sedicious bookes conteining manifest matter agaynste the estate established. Which boldnesse of men so Vniuersally and euery where seene and heard, cannot be thought to be done but by the comfort and ayd or at the least way winckt at by thē whō the Queenes highnes hath placed in authority to repres these insolencyes. And the Queenes highnes can not more iustlye charge any for this disorder, then such who be in commissiōs

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