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DenhamHughendenIpswichReptonUxbridge
 
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Denham

Buckinghamshire

OS grid ref: TQ 045 865

 
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Hughenden

[Hichenden; Hitchenden; Chychenden]

Buckinghamshire

OS grid ref: SU 865 965

 
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Ipswich
Ipswich, Ipswiche
NGR: TM 170 440

A borough in the liberty of Ipswich, county of Suffolk. 25 miles south-east by east from Bury St. Edmunds, 69 miles north-east from London. The borough comprises the parishes of St. Clement, St. Helen, St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at the Quay, St. Mary Stoke, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Mathew, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Stephen, Witham with Thurlstone, and part of Westerfield; all within the Archdeaconry of Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich. St. Clement with St. Helen is a rectory in charge; St. Mary Stoke is a rectory; St. Mathew and St. Stephen are discharged rectories; St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at Quay, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Nicholas and St. Peter are perpetual curacies

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Repton

[Repindon; Repyngdon]

Derbyshire

OS grid ref: SK 305 265

 
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Uxbridge
NGR: TQ 053 836

A chapelry in the parish of Hillingdon, hundred of Elthorne, county of Middlesex. 15 miles west by north from London. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry of Middlesex and Diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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851 [827]

K. Henry 8. Persecution in the Dioces of Lincolne.
Accusers.Parties accused.Crimes obiected.

Agayne, when Elizabeth came from the roode of rest sayd Isabell, that if she knew so much as shee hath heard, shee would go no more on pilgrimage while she liued: for all Saints, said she, be in heauen. Then asked Elizabeth wherfore pilgrimage was ordeined of Doctours and Priestes. Said the other, for gaine & profit. Who hath taught you this quoth Elizabeth? man or womā? Your Curate, I dare say, neuer learned you so. My Curate sayd she, will neuer knowe so much: and moreouer sayd to Elizabeth her sister, that if she woulde keepe counsaile, & not tell her husband, she would say more. And when Elizabeth answered, that she would not tell: but sayth the other, I will haue you to sweare: and because she woulde not sweare, the other would not proceed any further.

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The cause why this
Iohn Tracher was de-
nounced, was thys, for
Alice Browne.that hee taught her in
forced by herIohn Tra-the Gospell this sayeng
othe too de-cher ofof Iesus: Blessed bee
tect.Ches-they that heare the word
sham.of GOD and keepe
it. Also, because hee
taughte her the eyghte
beatitudes in English.

¶ Emme Tilseword 

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She was the sister of William Tilsworth.

because she refused to detect other by vertue of her othe, and denied such matter as by witnes and by the Bishops acte were prooued against her, in paine of relaps the Bishop enioyned her to make certaine fagots of cloth, and to weare the same, both before her vpper garment, and behinde, so long as she liued. Ex Regist. Longland.

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For asking howe hys
cousin Widmore clerke,
Thomasthe elder, and Iohn Fip 
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A John Phipp appeared on the list of those in the Amersham area who abjured in 1511. It probably was not the same person, since Phipp was not executed for relapse in 1521, but it could well have been a close relative.

Afrike.did at Hichenden: whe-
ther they kepte the lawes
of GOD as they were
W. Phippeswoont.
forced byRoger Parker deceased.
his othe toFor sayeng that Ima-
detect.ges are not to bee woor-
shipped, because they are
Ioh. Phip. 
Commentary  *  Close

A John Phipp appeared on the list of those in the Amersham area who abjured in 1511. It probably was not the same person, since Phipp was not executed for relapse in 1521, but it could well have been a close relative.

made and carued wyth
mans hande, and that
such ought not to be wor-
shipped.
For that to the sayde
IohnWil. this Gardiner sayd,
Gardi-that all which are burned
ner.for thys secte, are true
Martyrs.
Iohn Stilman. 
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This may be John Stillman. The full record for Stillman's trial does not survive, but there are references to it in Archbishop Ussher's notes, taken from the London courtbook before it disappeared. These notes corroborate Stillman's claiming that Wiclif was a saint in heaven and that Wiclif's Wicket was a good and holy work (Trinity College, Dublin, MS 775, fos. 124r and 125r). Moreover, Stillman had indeed been tried for heresy by Bishop Edmund Audley of Salisbury (J. A. F. Thomson, The Later Lollards, 1414-1520 (Oxford. 1965), pp. 83-84).

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For reading and tea-
ching him in the acts and
preachings of the Apo-
stles. Item, for hauing
a Scripture Booke in
ThomasEnglish: whyche Booke,
Geffraythe sayde Gefferay gaue
firste ofto the Byshoppe of Lon-
Vxbridgedon when hee was accu-
then ofsed.
IpswichItem, that the sayde
Iohn ButlerTaylor.Gefferay sayde, that true
by his othePilgrimage was bare-
was forced tofoote to go and visite the
detect.poore, weake, and sicke, for
they are the true Images
of God.
This Vulforde, and
Thomas Gefferay tolde
the sayde Iohn Butler,
that the hoste consecra-
Richardted, was not the verye
Vulford.true bodye of Christe.
In proofe whereof, they
sayde, that let a Mouse
bee put in the pixe wyth
the hoste, and the Mouse
woulde eate it vp. MarginaliaA story of a mouse put into the pixe.And
for more proofe, they declared vnto the sayde Iohn
Butler, that there were two Priests in Essex, which
put a mouse in the pixe to a consecrated hoste, and the
MarginaliaAnno. 1521. Ex Regist. In. Longland. Lincolne.Accusers.Parties accused.Crimes obiected.
mouse did eate it. After-
warde the facte of these
Priestes beyng knowne
and brought to the By-
shop, one of the Priestes
was burned for the same.
Also the same Vulford
and Geffrey told him and
Iohn Clerke, that holy
bread, and holy water
Ioh. Clerkewere but a vayne glorye
of Dēham.of the world: for God ne-
uer made them, but were
mennes inuentions: and
that GOD neither made
Priestes, for in Christes
time there were no priests
Moreouer, that Tho-
mas Geffrey caused this
Iohn Butler diuers Sō-
dayes to goe to London
to heare MarginaliaDoctor Colet commended.Doctour Colet.
Because this Iohn
Butler had an olde booke
of Richard Vulford.
Also an other greate
booke of Andrewe Fuller
for whiche hee payde sixe
shillyngs and foure pence 
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Foxe is interested in demonstrating the zeal of the Lollards in acquiring godly literature, but this is also an indication of the affluence of many of these Lollards. On the importance of books to the Lollards see Margaret Aston, 'Lollardy and Literacy' in Lollards and Reformers: Images and and literacy in late medieval England (London, 1984), pp. 1-47.

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Andrewand an other litle booke of
Fuller ofThomas Man, 
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This detailed account of Thomas Man appears to be based on two sources that are now lost: a court book of the diocese of London recording heresy trials under Bishops Fitzjames and Tunstall, and a court book of the diocese of Lincoln, recording heresy trials under Bishops Smith and Longland. (The Lincoln courtbook probably also contained the now lost records of Longland's persecution in the Chilterns in 1521). Foxe may also have had an unnamed informant for Thomas Man's execution. Foxe's account of Man is very convincing in its circumstantial detail. There is also one piece of corroboration for it: the signification of Man's excommunication and transfer to secular authority for execution and it is dated 1 March 1518 (TNA C 85/126/28).

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which he
Vxbridge.brought to the Byshop.
Moreouer, this Tho-
mas Man, was appea-
ched, because hee read to
this deponent ten yeares
agoe: howe Adam and
Eue were expelled out of
Paradise: and for spea-
kyng agaynste Pilgri-
The fore-mage and worshyppyng
sayd Iohnof Images, and agaynst
Butler didThomasthe singyng seruice vsed
detect.Man.then in Churches.
This Thomas Man,
was burnt and dyed a
Martyr, of whō mention
is made before. 
Commentary  *  Close

This detailed account of Thomas Man appears to be based on two sources that are now lost: a court book of the diocese of London recording heresy trials under Bishops Fitzjames and Tunstall, and a court book of the diocese of Lincoln, recording heresy trials under Bishops Smith and Longland. (The Lincoln courtbook probably also contained the now lost records of Longland's persecution in the Chilterns in 1521). Foxe may also have had an unnamed informant for Thomas Man's execution. Foxe's account of Man is very convincing in its circumstantial detail. There is also one piece of corroboration for it: the signification of Man's excommunication and transfer to secular authority for execution and it is dated 1 March 1518 (TNA C 85/126/28).

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pag. 817.
This William Kyng
was appeached because
he lodged Thomas Man 
Commentary  *  Close

This detailed account of Thomas Man appears to be based on two sources that are now lost: a court book of the diocese of London recording heresy trials under Bishops Fitzjames and Tunstall, and a court book of the diocese of Lincoln, recording heresy trials under Bishops Smith and Longland. (The Lincoln courtbook probably also contained the now lost records of Longland's persecution in the Chilterns in 1521). Foxe may also have had an unnamed informant for Thomas Man's execution. Foxe's account of Man is very convincing in its circumstantial detail. There is also one piece of corroboration for it: the signification of Man's excommunication and transfer to secular authority for execution and it is dated 1 March 1518 (TNA C 85/126/28).

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in his house vppon a cer-
taine holy day at diuine
seruice: vnto whom resor-
ted Richard Vulford, and
Ioh. Clerke, & this Ioh.
Butler: to whom the sayd
WilliamTho. Man 
Commentary  *  Close

This detailed account of Thomas Man appears to be based on two sources that are now lost: a court book of the diocese of London recording heresy trials under Bishops Fitzjames and Tunstall, and a court book of the diocese of Lincoln, recording heresy trials under Bishops Smith and Longland. (The Lincoln courtbook probably also contained the now lost records of Longland's persecution in the Chilterns in 1521). Foxe may also have had an unnamed informant for Thomas Man's execution. Foxe's account of Man is very convincing in its circumstantial detail. There is also one piece of corroboration for it: the signification of Man's excommunication and transfer to secular authority for execution and it is dated 1 March 1518 (TNA C 85/126/28).

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declared, that
Kyng.pilgrimage was naught,
& that Images were not
to be worshypped.
To these was layd that
Thom. Carder brought
this Ioh. Butler to Dur-
dantes house at Iuēcourt
by Stanis, where was
Rob. Car-Rich. Butler his brother,
der.and William Kyng rea-
dyng in a certaine Eng-
Durdant.glishe booke: At whiche
Rich. But-tyme Durdant desired thē
ler his ownnot to tell, that he had any
brother.such English booke in his
Wil. Kynghouse, least hee should be
burned for the same.
Rich. NashAlso an other tyme,
or Ashford.that Iohn Butler with
Richard Butler his bro-
ther, and Robert Carder
wēt to the house of Rich.
Ashford or Nashe, to heare the same
Ashford read in a certaine little booke,
but which cōteined many good things.
This
CCc.iiij.