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Ägerisee [Egree] (Lake Aegeri)

Zug, Switzerland

Coordinates: 47° 7' 0" N, 8° 37' 0" E

 
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Brunnen [Brun]

Bay of Uri [Vrania], Lake Lucerne, Schwyz, Switzerland

Coordinates: 46° 59' 44" N, 8° 36' 17" E

 
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Glarus

Switzerland

Capital of the canton of Glarus

Coordinates: 47° 2' 0" N, 9° 4' 0" E

 
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Morgarten pass

Switzerland

 
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Zürich

[Zurick]

Switzerland

Coordinates: 47° 22' 0" N, 8° 33' 0" E

890 [866]

K. Henry. 8. The league betwixt the Pages of Suitzerland. The life of Zuinglius.

MarginaliaExample of true chastitie in a matrone.Another time in the sayd Syluania, as the good man of the house was absent abroade, the gouernour which had then the rule of the towne, entring into the house, cōmandeth the wife to prepare for him a bath, and to let him haue his pleasure of her. Wherunto she being vnwilling, differred the bathe as long as she might, till the returne of her husband. MarginaliaAdultery iustly punished.To whome then she making her complaynt, so moued his mind, that he with his axe or hatchet which he had in his hand, flew vpō the adulterous ruler & slue him.

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MarginaliaExample of singular tyrannye.Another example of like violence is reported of the ruler of Suicia, and Siluania, who surprised with like pride and disdaine against the poore vnderlings, caused his cap to be hanged vp vpon a pole, charging and commanding by his seruant, all that passed by, to do obeysance to the cap. Which, when one, named William Tell, MarginaliaW. Tell. refused to do, the tiraunt caused his sonne to be tied, with an apple set vpon his head, and the father with a crossebow, or a like instrument, to shoote at the apple. After long refusing, whē the wofull father could not otherwise choose, by force constreined, but must leauill at the apple, as God would, he mist the child, and stroke the marke. This Tell, being thus compelled by the tirant to shoote at his sonne, had brought with him two shaftes, thinking that if he had stroke the child with the one, the other he would haue let driue at the tyraunt. Which being vnderstand, he was apprehended, and led to the rulers house: but by the way escaping out of the boate, betweene Vrania and Brun, and passing thorough the mountaines with as much speede as he might, he lay in the way secretly as the ruler should passe, MarginaliaPride and tyrannye well rewarded.where he discharged his arow at the tyraunt, and slue him.

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And thus were these cruell gouernours vtterly expelled out of these three valleyes or pages aforesayd, and after that, such order was taken by the Emperour Henricus 7. and also by the Emperours Ludouicus duke of Bauaria, that henceforth no iudge should be set ouer them, but only of their owne companie, and towne dwellers. MarginaliaEx Sebast. Mūst. Cosmog. lib. 3.Ex Seb. Munst. Cosmog. lib. 3.

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It folowed after this, in the yeare of our Lord 1315. that great contention and war fell betweene Fridericke Duke of Austria, and Ludouicke Duke of Bauaria, striuing and fighting the space of eight yeares together about the Empire. With Ludouicus held the three pages aforesayd: who had diuers conflicts with Lupoldus, brother to the forenamed Fridericke Duke of Austria, fighting in his brothers quarell. As Lupoldus had reared a mighty army of twenty thousand footemen and horsemen, and was come to Egree, so to passe ouer the mountaines to subdue the pages: he began to take aduise of his counsaile, by what way or passage best he might direct his iourney toward the Suitzers. Whereupon, as they were busy in consulting, there stoode a foole by (named Kune de Stocken) which hearing their aduise, thought also to shoote his bolt withall, MarginaliaA fooles bolt somtimes hits the marke. and told them that their counsaile did not like him. For all you (quoth he) consult how we should enter into yonder countrey: but none of you geueth any counsaile how to come out againe, after we be entred. And in conclusion, as the foole said, so they found it true. For when Lupoldus, with his hoste had entred into the straites and valleyes betweene the rockes and mountaines, the Suitzers wyth their neighbours of Vrania, and Sisluania, lieng in priuie waite, had thē at such aduantage, & with tumbling downe stones from the rockes, and sodeine comming vpon theyr backes in blinde lanes, did so encomber them, that neither they had conuenient standing to fight, nor roome almost to flie away. By reason whereof, a great part of Lupoldus army there being enclosed about þe place called Morgartē, lost their liues, & many in the flight were slaine. Lupoldus with thē that remained, retired and escaped to Thurgoia. This battaile was fought, anno. 1315. Nouember 16.

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MarginaliaThe first league betweene the 3. Pages.After this, the burgers of these three villages, being continually vexed by Fridericke Duke of Austria, for that they would not knowledge him for Emperour, assembled them selues in the towne of Vrania, an. 1316. and there entred a mutuall league and bond of perpetuall societie and coniunction, ioining and swearing themselues, as in one bodie of a common wealth, and publike administration, together. After that came to them Lucernates, then Tugiani, after them the Tigurines, next to them folowed Bernates, the last almost of all, were the Basilians, then followed after, the other seauen pages aboue recited.

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And thus haue ye the names, the freedome, and confederatiō of these Suitzers, or Cantons or pages of Heluetia, with the occasions & circumstāces therof briefly expressed. Now to the purpose of our story intended, which is to declare the successe of Christes Gospel and true Religion receaued amōg these Heluetians: also touching the life & doctrine of Zuinglius, & order of his death, as heere insueth.

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¶ The actes and life of Zuinglius, and of receauing the Gospell in Zuitzerland.

MarginaliaVldrichus Zuinglius.IN the tractation of Luthers story, mention was made before of Vldricus Zuinglius, who first abiding at Glarona, in a place called then our Lords Ermitage, from thence remoued to Zuricke, about the yeare of our Lorde 1519. and there began to teach, dwelling in the Minster among the Canons or Priestes of that close, vsing with them, the same rites and ceremonies during the space of ij. or iij. yeares, MarginaliaZuinglius reading the scriptures at Zurike.where he continued reading and explaining the Scriptures vnto the people with great trauaile, and no less dexteritie. And because Pope Leo, the same yeare, had renued his pardons againe through all the countreys (as is aboue declared) Zuinglius zelously withstood the same, MarginaliaZuinglius against the Popes pardons. detecting the abuses thereof by the Scriptures, and of other corruptions reigning then in the Church, and so continued by the space of two yeares and more, till at length Hugo Bishop of Constance (to whose iurisdiction Zuricke then also did belong) hearing thereof, wrote his letters to the Senate of the said Citie of Zuricke, Marginalia

Anno. 1521.

The Bishop of Constāce complayneth against Zuinglius.

complayning greeuously of Zuinglius, who also wrote another letter to the colledge of Canons, where Zuinglius was the same time dwelling, complaining likewise of such new teachers, which troubled the Churche, and exhorted them earnestly, to beware and to take diligent heede to themslenes. And forsomuch as both the Pope and the Emperours Maiestie had condemned all such new doctrine by their decrees and Edicts, he willed them therefore to admit no such new innouations of doctrine, without the cōmon consent of them, to whome the same did appertayne. Zuinglius hearing therof, referreth his cause to the iudgemēt and hearing of the Senate, not refusing to render vnto them accompt of his faith. And forsomuch as the Byshops letter was read openly in the colledge, Zuinglius directeth another letter to the Bishop againe, declaring that the sayd letter proceeded not frō the Bishop, nor that he was ignoraunt who were the authors thereof, desiring him not to follow their sinister counsailes, for that truth (said he) is a thing inuincible, and can not be resisted. After the same tenour, certaine other of the Citie likewise wrote vnto the Bishop, desiring him that he would attempt nothing, that should be preiudiciall to the libertie and free course of the Gospell: requiring moreouer, that he would forebeare no longer the filthie and infamous life of priests, but that he woulde permit them to haue theyr lawfull wiues, &c. This was in the yeare of our Lord 1522.

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MarginaliaZuinglius writeth to the Heluetians.Besides this, Zuinglius wrote also another letter to the whole nation of the Heluetians, monishing them, in no case to hinder the passage of sincere doctrine, nor to inferre any molestation to Priests that were maried. MarginaliaPriestes mariage.For as for the vowe and coaction of their single life, it came (sayd he) of the diuell, and a diuelish thing it is. MarginaliaAn olde vse of the Heluetians to forewarne their priests to take concubines.And therefore, whereas the said Heluetians had such a rite and custome in their townes and pages, that when they receiued anie new Priest into their Churches, they vsed to premonish him before to take his concubine, least he should attempt any misuse with their wiues and daughters: he exhorted them that they would no lesse graunt vnto them to take their wiues in honest matrimonie, then to take concubines and harlots, against the precept of God.

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MarginaliaZuinglius resisted by aduersariesThus as Zuinglius continued certaine yeares, labouring in the word of the Lord, offence began to rise at thys new doctrine, and diuers stept vp, namely the Dominicke Friers on the contrary side, to preach & inuey against him. But he keping himselfe euer within the Scriptures, protested that he would make good by the word of God, that which he had taught. Vpon this the Magistrates and Senate of Zuricke, sent forth their cōmandemēt to all priests and ministers within their dominion, MarginaliaDisputatiōs at Zuricke about religion.to repaire to the citie of Zuricke, against the xxix. day of Ianuary next ensuing (this was anno. 1523.) there euery one to speake freely, and to be heard quietly, touching these controuersies of religion, what could be said, directing also their letters to the Bishop of Cōstance, that he would either make his repaire thether himselfe, or else to send his deputie. When the day appointed came, and the Bishops vicegerent, which was Ioannes Faber, MarginaliaIoan. Faber Stapulensis against Zuinglius. Ex Sled. lib 3. was also present: the Consull first declaring the cause of this their frequencie and assemble (which was for the dissention newly risen about matters of Religion) required, that if any there had to obiect, or inferre against the doctrine of Zuinglius, he should freely and quietly vtter and declare his minde.

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MarginaliaLxvij. articles of Zuinglius.Zuinglius had disposed his matter before, and cōtriued al his doctrine in a certaine order of places, to þe number of lxvij. Articles: which articles he had published also abroad before, to the ende that they which were disposed, might

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