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755 [731]

K. Hēr. 7. The history and tyranny of the Turkes.

prouince of Mustapha his brother: Gianger crying out for sorrow of his brothers death: phy of thee, sayth he to his father, thou impious and wretched dog, traytour, murderer, I can not call thee father, take the treasures, the horse & armour of Mustapha to thee selfe: and with that takyng out his dagger, thrust it through his own body. 

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Süleyman's son Cihangir did die shortly after his brother, but the storythat he committed suicide is fanciful. Foxe derived it from Mossen's account of Mustapha's murder in Bartolomeo Georgevits, De origine imperii Turcorum (Wittenburg, 1560), sigs. M4v-M5r.

And thus was Solymā murderer and parricide of his owne sonnes: which was in the yeare of our Lord. 1552.

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MarginaliaThe louyng prouidence of our Lord for his Christians. Wherein notwithstandyng is to be noted the singular prouidence and loue of the Lord toward his afflicted Christians. For this Mustapha as he was couragious & greatly expert and exercised in all practise of warre: so had he a cruell hart, malitiously set to shed þe bloud of christiās: Wherfore great cause haue we to cōgratulate, & to geue thankes to God, for the happy taking away of this Mustapha. 

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This is apparently Foxe's opinion, but it was widely held one. Mustapha was a favourite of the Janissaries.

MarginaliaGood hope at Gods hand to be conceaued of Christians. And no lesse hope also and good comfort we may conceaue of our louyng Lord, hereby ministred vnto vs, to thinke that our mercyfull God after these sore afflictions of his Christians vnder these. xij. Turkes afore recited: now after this Solyman entendeth some gratious good worke to Christēdome, to reduce and release vs out of this so long and miserable Turkish captiuitie: as may be hoped now by takyng away these young impes of this impious generation, before they should come to worke their cōceaued malice agaynst vs: the Lord therfore be glorified and praysed. Amen.

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Moreouer as I was in writyng hereof, oportunely came to my handes a certaine writing out of Germany, 

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Foxe is referring to a pamphlet, Newes from Vienna the 5 dayof August 1566 (London, 1566), STC 24716, which he proceeds to quote from at length.

certifieng vs of such newes & victory of late atchiued agaynst the Turke, as may not a litle increase our hope and cōfort as touchyng the decay and ruine of the Turkes power and tyranny agaynst vs. Which newes are these: MarginaliaGood newes of the turkes lately repulsed by the Christians. þt after 
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The following account of a Turkish repulse when besieging thefortress of Gyula in Hungary in 1566 is reprinted from Newes from Vienna the5 day of August (London, 1566), STC 24716, sigs. B2r-B3r. In fact, the successwas ephemeral: Gyula fell to the Turks on 1 September 1566.

þe Turkish tyraunt had besieged with an army of. 30000. men, the famous and strong town and Castle of Iula in Hungary, lying. 40. Dutch myles beyōd the riuer Danubius, which Citie had, by the space of vj. weekes susteyned many greuous assaultes: God through his great mercy and goodnes so comforted the sayd town of Iula and the poore Christians therein, at their earnest prayers, that the Turke with all his host was driuen backe, by the handes of the general, called Keretshim Laslaw and his valiaunt company. Who not onely defended the sayd towne, but also constrayned the Turkes to retyre, to their great shame and confusion, with a great slaughter of the Turkishe rable: For the which the euerliuyng God be praysed for euer.

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The maner of their ouerthrow was this. Marginalia8000. turkes slayne. As the foresayd general did see his aduaūtage with captaine George, & other horsmen of the Sclesians and Hungariās, they set on the rereward of the Turkes and killed about. 8000. of thē, and tooke also some of their artillary & folowed them so fast, that the Turkes were constrayned to flye into a marishe grounde, and to breake the wheeles of the rest of their artillary, to saue themselues, and therewith they got a very rich booty, MarginaliaChristiā captiues rescued and takē from the turkes. rescuyng besides and takyng frō the Turkes a great number of Christian prisoners. Like thankes also are to be geuen to God, for the prosperous successe geuen to Marginalia800. turkes slayne. Magotschie the valiaunt Captaine of Erla, who makyng toward the Turkes, and encounteryng with the Tartarians, slue of them about viij. hundreth.

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MarginaliaA great captayne of the turkes slaine and his treasure taken. Not long after this, it happened through the like prouidence of our God, a Turkish Captaine called Begen, accōpanyd with a thousand fresh horsemen came newly out of Turky, to go toward the Citie named Quinqu Ecclesiæ, or Finffenkyrchen: with whom the Earle of Serin by the way did encounter, and in the night settyng vpon hym, killed the Captaine and tooke viij. Camels, and viij. Moyles laden with treasure, and also got two red Guidons, with a whole great peece of rich cloth of gold, and with an other fayre and straunge Iewel. The horse of this forsayd Turkish captaine, was betrapped and decked most richely. The sadle wherof had the pomel and the backe part couered ouer with plate of fine Arabicke gold, and the rest of the sadle, beside the sittyng place, was plated with siluer very fayre gilded. The seate of the sadle was couered with purple veluet: the trappers and bridle beset with litle Turkeys, and Rubies: Which horse was sent to Vienna vnto the Emperour Maximilian for a present.

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Although the Earle would very fayne haue saued the Captaine, not knowing what he was, yet the Ianizarites, labouryng to cary away their Captaine, so stifly defended thēselues, that the Earle with his company, was cōstrayned to kill both them and their Captaine. From whom the sayd Earle of Serin the same time, got. xv. thousand Turkish and Hungarish Ducates: which money was brought for the payement of the Turkishe souldiours in the towne aforesayd of Finffenkyrchen. &c. All whiche 

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The passages that follow, on the need for Christian unity and thepossibility that the Turks might capture Rome are Foxe's opinions.

be good begynnings of greater goodnes to be hoped for hereafter, through the grace of Christ our Lord, especially if our Christiā ru lers and potentates, first the Churchemen and Prelates for their partes: then the ciuile powers and princes for their partes, wyth holding their affectiōs a litle, will turne their brawles and variauuce, into brotherly concorde and agreement, which the Lord of peace put in their mindes to doe. Amen. Or otherwise if it so please the Lord, that the turke come further vpon vs, so as he hath begon, for our punishement and castigation, his grace then geue to the flocke of his poore Christians, constancie of fayth, pacience in suffering, and amendment of lyfe: MarginaliaThe turke pearcyng into Italy. For so I vnderstand by publicke fame, although vncerteinly rumored by the voyce of some, that the Turkes power of late, this present yeare of our Lord 1566. hath perced the parties of Apulia wythin Italy, wasting and burning the space of an. 100. myles toward Naples. 
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These rumors were false.

Which if it be certaayne, it is to be feared, that the Turke hauing thus set in his foote, & feeling þe sweetenes of Italy, will not so cease before he get in both head & shoulders also so farre into Italy, that he will display hys banners within the walles of Rome, & doe with old Rome the like as Mahumete his great grandfather did with new Rome the citie of Constantinople, and as the Persians did with Babylon.

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MarginaliaConiectures why it is to be feared that the turke shall gette Rome. The causes why we haue so to iudge, be diuers: first that the sea of Rome hath bene defended hetherto & mainteyned with much bloud, and therfore it may seeme not vncredible, but that it will not long continue, but be lost with bloud againe, according to the verdict of the Gospell: He that striketh with the sword, shal perish with the sword. &c. 

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Matthew 26:52.

An other cause is, the fulfilling of the xviij. chapter of the Apocalips: where is written that great Babylon shall fall and be made an habitation of deuils, and a denne of vnclean spirites, and a cage of filthy and vncleane byrdes: 
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Rev. 18:2.

the fall whereof shall be like a milstone in the sea, that is, which shall not rise againe. And this to come before þe day of iudgement, the texte of the sayde chapter doth appertly declare: where the wordes do folow, shewing that the kynges of the earth, and the marchantes which had to doe wyth the whorishe Citie, standing a farre of for feare of the heat, and beholding the smoke of the sayd Citie flaming and burning wyth fire, shall bewaile and rue her destruction and desolation. &c. What Citie this is, called great Babylon, which like a mylstone shall fall, and burne, and be made an habitation of vncleane spirites, and beastes, let the reader cōstrue. This is certayne and plaine by these her kynges and marchaunts standing a farre of for feare, and beholding her burnyng, MarginaliaThe prophesie of the 18. chap of the Apocalips expounded. that the destruction of this Citie (what Citie soeuer it be) shall be seene here in earth before the comming of the Lordes iudgement, as may easely be gathered by these iij. circumstances, that is, by the standing, the beholdyng, and bewayling of her marchauntes. By þe which marchauntes and kynges of the earth, peraduenture may be signified, the Pope, the rich Cardinals, the great Prelates and fat doctours, and other obedienciares of the Romishe sea: who at the comming of the Turkes, will not auenture their liues for their Church, but will flie the Citie (no doubt) & stand a farre of from daunger: and when they shall see with their eyes, and heare with their eares the Citie of Rome to be set on fire and consumed by the cruell Turkes, the sight therof shall seeme to them piteous and lamentable, to beholde the great and faire citie of Rome, the tall castell of S. Angell, the Popes mighty sea (where they were wont to fishe out such riches, dignities, treasures, and pleasures) so to burne before their eyes, and to come to such vtter desolatiō, which shall neuer be reedified againe, but shall be made an habitation of deuils and vncleane spirites, that is, of Turkes, and Heathen Sultans, and barbarous Saracēs &c. This (I say (peraduenture may be the meaning of that propheticall place of the Apoc: not that I haue here any thing to pronounce, but onely geue my gesse, what may probably be coniectured. But the end at length will make this and all other thynges more plaine and manifest: For mysticall prophesies lightly are neuer so well vnderstand, as when the euent of them is past and accomplished.

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MarginaliaThe third cause.
Ex Paulo Iouio.
An other cause concurryng with the causes aforesayd, may be collected out of Paulus Iouius, 

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This anecedote is taken from Paolo Giovio's commentary on theTurks as excerpted in Paolo Giovio, Machumetis Saracenorum princips…Alcoran (Basel, 1550), III, p. 132.

who writyng of the subuersion of Rhodes, which was as ye heard. an. 1522. vpon Christmas day: sayth that it chaūced sodenly the same day in Rome, that as Pope Hadrian the vj. was entryng into the church to his seruice, sodenly ouer his head the vpper frontier or toppe of the Chapell doore, which was of marble, immediatly as the Pope was entryng, fell downe and slue certaine of his garde waityng vpon him. Whereby peraduēture may be ment, that the ruine of Rome was not long after to folow the losse of Rhodes.

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MarginaliaThe fourth cause.
Ex Ioan. Auentino Annal. lib. 3. fol. 30.
The fourth cause I borow out of Ioannes Auentinus 

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Johannes Aventinus, Annalium Boiorum (Ingolstadt, 1554), p. 301.

, who in his thyrd booke alledgyng the names, but not the

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