Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
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Andrew Pierson

(d. 1594)

D.Th. 1551 (Cambridge); Senior Proctor Corpus Christi, Cambridge [DNB]

Foxe records that Pierson was deprived of his living by John Young on 3 October 1553 for administering Edwardine communion and refusing to celebrate mass (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1406).

Neither Foxe nor the DNB list the living from which Pierson was expelled, but John Fines, citing A. F. Northcote, Notes of the History of Monks Eleigh (Ipswich, 1930), gives the living as Monks Eleigh and states that Pierson was presented in 1551. [Significantly this living was in the gift of the archbishop of Canterbury].

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[NB: The DNB gives Pierson?s last name as ?Peerson?, Fines as ?Pearson?.]

 
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Edward Courtenay

(1526? - 1556)

Earl of Devon (DNB)

As a child, Courtenay had been imprisoned in the Tower because of the treason of his father, under Henry VIII, but he was released on Mary's entry into London. She made him earl of Devon, and it was widely rumored that she would marry him. He went to Italy after his release in 1555, and died in Venice in 1556 (1570, p. 1579; 1576, p 1347; and 1583, p. 1417).

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Suspected of involvement in Wyatt's rebellion, Courtenay was committed to the Tower in March 1554, together with Elizabeth who was also suspected of the same crime (1563, p. 927; 1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

It was reported to Sir Thomas White, Lord Mayor of London, that Sir Thomas Wyatt, on the day of his execution, asked the lieutenant of the Tower, Lord Chandos, for an interview with Edward Courtenay. Wyatt begged Courtenay's forgiveness for having falsely accused Elizabeth and him of complicity in his treason (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425). Sir Martin Bowes, the recorder for London, told White that he had heard that Wyatt begged Courtenay to confess the truth (1570, pp. 1587-88; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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At the trial in the Star Chamber of an apprentice named Cut who was charged with sedition for stating that Wyatt had cleared Elizabeth, Stephen Gardiner accused Elizabeth and Courtenay (neither was present) of treason. Gardiner also castigated Courtenay for his ingratitude to the monarch who had released him from prison (1570, p. 1588; 1576, p 1355; and 1583, p. 1425). On this occasion Sir John Brydges, the lieutenant of the Tower, declared that he was present at Wyatt's interview with Courtenay and that Wyatt had urged Courtenay to confess his guilt (1570, p. 1588; 1576, p 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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Courtenay accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1466).

Foxe relates another version of the story in which Sir Thomas Wyatt at his execution cleared Elizabeth and Courtenay of involvement in his rebellion. In this version, Hugh Weston told Wyatt that he had said the opposite to the privy council and Wyatt retorted that what he said now was the truth (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p 1399; and 1583, p. 1469).

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Edward Courteney was imprisoned in the Tower under suspicion of being involved in Wyatt's uprising. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2092.

Chandos interrogated a young boy who was believed to be carrying messages between Elizabeth and Edward Courteney during their imprisonment in the Tower. He ordered the boy not to see Elizabeth. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2092.

 
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Edward Stanley

(1508 - 1572)

3rd earl of Derby [DNB]

Edward Stanley accompanied Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466.)

He was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to Bonner, dated 27 November 1554, informing him that Mary was pregnant and ordering him to have prayers and Te Deums said throughout his diocese (1563, pp. 1014-15; 1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, pp. 1475-76.)

Stanley summoned George Marsh to Lathom House, his residence, and examined him there. 1570, p. 1732; 1576, p. 1479; 1583, p. 1562.

He detained Marsh at Lathom House, in harsh conditions, but after examining Marsh a second time he believed that Marsh would recant and ordered that he be well treated. 1570, p. 1734; 1576, p. 1479; 1583, p. 1562.

Stanley interrogated Marsh formally in Lancaster Castle. During the session, the earl told Marsh that he had never consented to the laws of Edward VI concerning religion. 1570, p. 1734; 1576, p. 1481; 1583, p. 1564.

Bishop Bourne declared that Bradford had caused much trouble with his letters, as had been reported by the earl of Derby. 1563, p. 1186, 1570, p. 1783, 1576, p. 1523, 1583, p. 1606.

Gardiner, on the subject of Bradford's allegedly seditious letters, referred to a report given by the earl of Derby. Bradford claimed that he had been denied paper, pen and ink. 1563, p. 1190, 1570, p. 1786, 1576, p. 1525, 1583, p. 1609.

It was intended that Bradford be handed to the earl of Derby and burned in Manchester, but these original plans were altered and he was burned in London. 1563, p. 1199, 1570, pp. 1789-90, 1576, p. 1528,1583, p. 1611.

 
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Edward Whitchurch

(d. 1561)

Protestant printer (DNB

Exempted from Mary's coronation pardon, 1 October 1553, (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Francis Talbot

(1500 - 1560)

5th earl of Shrewsbury (DNB)

Francis Talbot accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He bore the cap of maintenance before Queen Mary at the opening of parliament on 12 November 1554 (1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, p. 1475).

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Francis Talbot was humble before Elizabeth at Hampton court after her release from the Tower. 1563, p. 1715, 1570, p. 2294, 1576, p. 1986, 1583, p. 2291.

[Foxe refers to him as Shrewsbury.]

 
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George Brooke

(Lord Cobham) (1527 - 1597)

9th Lord Cobham (Complete Peerage)

Signatory to a letter from the Privy Council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, stating that she was illegitimate and that Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1567; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

He accompanied Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He was committed to the Tower in February 1554 (1570, p. 1580; 1576, p. 1348; 1583, p. 1419).

He was released from the Tower on 24 March 1554 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Gray

Smith of Bishop's Stortford

Gray was charged with denying transubstantiation and was sent to London, but was saved from burning by Thomas Cromwell. 1570, p. 1355; 1576, p. 1157; 1583, p. 1185.

 
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Gregory Garth

(d. 1608)

Fellow of Pembroke 1548 [Venn]

Garth was called before a ?mayster Gray of Cambridge? on 26 September 1553 for not allowing a boy from Peterhouse to help him celebrate mass; mass was still illegal at this time (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Henry Bovell

(d. after 1562)

(Cambridge) University Preacher, 1554; Prebend of Southwell (1559 - 1562) [Venn]

On 31 October 1553, John Young sharply reproved one 'maister Thrackolde' who challenged Young over his lenient treatment of Bovell when the latter refused to swear to Mary's supremacy over the English church, as was still required by statute (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

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Henry Clifford

(d. 1570)

2nd Earl of Cumberland (DNB)

Accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p 1395; and 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Henry le Scrope

(1534 - 1592)

9th Lord Scrope of Bolton (DNB)

Accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Henry Neville

(1525? - 1563)

1st Earl of Westmorland (DNB, sub 'Neville, Ralph')

Accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Bore the Queen's sword before her in procession at the opening of Parliament on 12 November 1554 (1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, p. 1475).

 
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Henry Neville

(1527? - 1586)

6th Lord Abergavenny (Complete Peerage)

Accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Henry Parker

(d. 1556)

Lord Morley (Complete Peerage)

Accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1391; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Henry Radcliffe

(1506? - 1557)

2nd earl of Sussex [DNB, sub 'Radcliffe, Robert']

Henry Radcliffe accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Henry Radcliffe visited Elizabeth when she was imprisoned in the Tower 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2092.

 
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Henry Walker

(d. 1564)

Regius Professor of Physic (1555) [Venn]

This is probably the ?Dr Walker? who was present when John Young discharged John Madew as Master of Clare College (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

[Henry Walker is described by Venn as a ?zealous Catholic?.]

 
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Hugh Weston

(1505? - 1558)

Dean of Westminster (1553 - 1556). Archdeacon of Colchester (1554 - 1558). Dean of Windsor (1556 - 1557) [Fasti]. Prolocutor of the Lower House [Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer: A Life (Yale, 1996), pp. 563-68].

Hugh Weston was appointed Prolocutor of the 1553 Convocation, over which he presided and during which he disputed with Philpot and Aylmer (1563, pp. 906-16; 1570, pp. 1571-78; 1576, pp. 1340-47; and 1583, p. 1410-17).

According to a story related to Sir Thomas White (and printed by Foxe), Sir Thomas Wyatt declared from the scaffold that Elizabeth and Edward Courtenay were innocent of any involvement in his treason. Weston, who was on the scaffold, cried out to the crowd that Wyatt had confessed otherwise before the Privy Council. Allegedly White, on hearing a report of the incident, denounced Weston as a knave (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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Weston was prolocutor (technically Weston was prolocutor of the lower house of convocation) and head of a delegation sent to dispute with Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (see MacColloch, Cranmer, p. 563) at the Oxford Disputations (1563, pp. 932 and 936; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1428).

He received the doctors sent from Cambridge to the disputation (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1592; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1429).

He presided over the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 936-85; 1570, pp. 1592-1627; 1576, pp. 1358-88; 1583, pp. 1429-59).

[NB: A brief account of the entire disputations, which mentions Weston throughout, is given on 1563, pp. 933-35; part of this brief account listing the disputants with Ridley was reprinted in 1570, p. 1606; 1576, p. 1371; and 1583, p. 1441).

Weston presided over John Harpsfield's disputation for his D.D. on 19 April 1554. Weston debated with both Cranmer and Harpsfield (1563, pp. 986-91; 1570, pp. 1627-32; 1576, pp. 1389-92; 1583, pp. 1459-63).

Weston presided over the commissioners at the condemnation of Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer on 20 April 1554 (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-64).

Weston received a letter from Ridley of 23 April 1554, protesting that he had broken his promise to allow Ridley to examine a copy of the record of his disputation and also protesting the conduct of the disputation and demanding that Weston show Ridley's written answers to the propositions disputed to the Upper House of Convocation. Weston refused to deliver the letter and also a letter of protest which Cranmer had written to the Privy Council over the Disputations (Ridley's letter - included as part of Ridley's account of the disputation - is printed in 1563, p. 977, but Cranmer's letter and Weston's refusal to deliver the letters are not in this edition (see 1570, p. 1633; 1576, pp. 1393-94; 1583, p. 1464).

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Weston received Mary at Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He preached at Paul's Cross on 20 October 1553, exhorting his auditors to pray for souls in purgatory, denouncing the communion table as an oyster board and denouncing Cranmer's recent catechism (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

He attended the execution of Henry Grey, Duke of Suffolk, (according to Foxe) against the Duke's wishes. Also (according to Foxe) Weston was heckled by the crowd (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, pp. 1467-68).

He participated, together with Gilbert Bourne and Frances Mallet, in an effort to persuade Walter Mantell to recant (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1398; 1583, p. 1468).

When Sir Thomas Wyatt at his execution cleared Elizabeth and the Earl of Devon of involvement in his rebellion, Weston declared that this contradicted what Wyatt had earlier told the Privy Council. Wyatt retorted that what he said now was true (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

A prayer Weston made for the safe delivery of a child by Queen Mary is printed in 1563, p. 1015 (Latin and English versions); 1570, p. 1653; 1576, p. 1410; 1583, pp. 1480-81 (English only).

Foxe calls Weston a man whom 'all good and godly men worthily despise' and prints Laurence Saunders' account of Weston's attempting to persuade Nicholas Grimald and Saunders to recant. 1563, pp. 1041-42; 1570, p. 1667; 1576, p. 1422; 1583, p. 1496.

Weston was reported by Hooper to have obtained a commission in May 1554 to establish a disputation, despite its illegality. 1570, p. 1687; 1576, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1513.

On 21 March 1555 Bradford talked with Dr Weston, after being told of Weston's intention to visit via the earl of Derby's servant (when master Collier, Warden of Manchester had come to dinner at the Counter). 1576, p.1536. Bradford and Westo spoke to each other in the presence of Master Collier, the earl of Derby's servant, the subdean of Westminster, the keeper (Master Clayden), and others. 1570, 1799-80, 1576, pp.1536-7, 1583, pp.1619-20.

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On 25 February, at about 5pm, Master Weston visited Bradford and asked to speak with him in private. When the two men were alone, Weston thanked Bradford for his writings to him and then produced the work that Bradford had sent him. It was entitled, 'Certayne reasons againste Transubstantiation gathered by John Bradforde, and geuen to Doctour weston and others'. 1563, p. 1212. They discussed transubstantiation. 1563, pp. 1211-12, 1570, pp. 1801-2. [In 1570 this meeting is dated as the afternoon of 28 March].

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On 25 February (1563) or 28 March (1570 onwards) Weston told John Bradford of Grimald's recantation. 1563, p. 1212, 1570, p. 1801, 1576, p. 1538., 1583, p. 1621.

Bradford's reasons against transubstantiation were given to Weston and others. 1563, pp. 1211-12, 1570, pp. 1800-1, 1576, pp. 1537-38, 1583, pp. 1620-21.

On 5 April, at 2pm, Weston went to visit Bradford in the Counter. Weston had not visited him earlier due to ill health and also because he had been busy withstanding monks from entering Westminster. He also thought that Pendleton would be coming to see him. Weston told Bradford that the pope was dead and that Weston had petitioned the queen and so thought that death would not come to Bradford soon. 1570, p. 1802, 1576, pp. 1538-39, 1583, pp. 1621-22.

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As Weston left Bradford on 5 April, he set for Master Weale. 1570, p. 1802, 1576, p. 1539, 1583, p. 1622.

After Weston left Bradford on 5 April, the keeper, Master Claydon, and Steven Bech came to Bradford and spoke unkindly to Bradford even though they had hitherto appeared to be friendly to him. 1570, p. 1802, 1576, pp. 1538-39, 1583, pp. 1621-22.

Weston was one of the audience at the re-examination of Ridley and Latimer and interjected a question. 1563, p. 1363; 1570, p. 1926, 1576, p. 1652, 1583, p. 1761.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Cranmer was condemned by Weston and others of the university. He was committed to the mayors and sherriffs of Oxford. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Hugh Weston displeased Pole for being willing to give up his deanery.

Weston was caught committing adultery and appealed to Rome for clemency.

He died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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John Bird

(d. 1558)

Bishop of Chester (1542 - 1554) [DNB]

Bird was discharged from parliament and convocation on 5 October 1553 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466. Foxe refers to 'Chester' as 'Westchester'.

He was present at a sharp exchange between Bishop Bonner and Thomas Hawkes. Bird was supposed to converse with Hawkes that evening but he fell asleep during the conversation. 1563, pp. 1152-53; 1570, pp. 1761-62; 1576, pp. 1504-05; 1583, p. 1588

[An account of a disastrous sermon Bird preached, in his capacity as vicar of Dunmow, Essex (a living he retained after he was deprived of his bishopric) is in Foxe's papers (BL, Harley MS 421, fo. 1r-v). Foxe never printed the sermon but it was printed by Strype (EM III, 1, pp. 218-20).]

 
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John Conyers

(d. 1557) (Complete Peerage)

Lord Conyers

Warden of the East Marches and Governor of Berwick under Mary.

Accompanied Queen to Westminster Abbey, 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Spelt 'Conias' by Foxe.

 
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John Harley

(d. 1558)

Bishop of Hereford (DNB)

Edwardian bishop of Hereford. Harley walked out of the mass which was celebrated at the commencement of the 1553 parliament. He was deprived of his bishopric because he was married (1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339; and 1583, p. 1410).

He was discharged from parliament and convocation in 1553 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

[Also referred to as 'Bishop of Hartford']

 
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John Madew

(d. 1555)

Master of Clare College, Cambridge (1549 ? 1553) [Venn]

On 26 October 1553, John Madew was discharged as Master of Clare on the grounds that he was married by John Young, acting on Stephen Gardiner?s authority, (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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John Taylor

Registrar of Gloucester.

Foxe received testimony of Thomas Dowry's death from John Taylor. 1583, p. 1911.

[Alias Barker.]

 
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John Threlkelde or Threllkell

These may be two separate people; if so, both matriculated from Christ's College as pensioners in 1554-55. If they are two people, one of them is quite possibly the 'maister Thrackolde' who challenged John Young over his lenient treatment of Henry Bovell (also of Christ's) for refusing to swear to Mary's supremacy over the English Church (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

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John Young

(1514 - 1580)

DD (1553). Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge (1536). Original founder of Trinity College, Cambridge (1546). Vice-chancellor of Cambridge (1553 - 1554). Master of Pembroke College, Cambridge (1554 - 1559). Regius professor of divinity (1555). Deprived of all preferments under Elizabeth. Imprisoned (1561 - 1579). Removed to Wisbech castle and died there. (DNB)

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On 3 October 1553, Young challenged one 'maister Pierson' for ministering communion in his parish and refusing to say mass. On 5 October Pierson was discharged from his living (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

On 26 October 1553, John Young, acting on Stephen Gardiner's authority and in the presence of a Dr Walker, discharged John Madew as Master of Clare on the grounds that he was married. Madew was replaced by Roland Swynborne (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

On 31 October 1553 Young sharply reproved one 'maister Thrackolde' for challenging Young over his lenient treatment of Henry Bovell. Bovell had refused to swear to Mary's supremacy over the English church, as was still required by statute (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

On 3 November 1553 Young ordered the curate of the Round Church in Cambridge not to minister in the vernacular and declared that all services in Cambridge town were to be held in Latin (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

On 12 January 1554, Young called a congregation general at Cambridge, and ordered that a mass of the Holy Ghost be celebrated there on 18 February, Mary's birthday. This was done (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

John Young was one of the official disputants in the Oxford disputations of April 1554 (1563, pp. 932, 936-38 and 951-53; 1570, pp. 1591-93 and 1602-4; 1576, pp. 1358-59 and 1367-68; 1583, pp. 1428-30 and 1438-39).

[NB: A brief account of the Oxford disputations of 1554, printed only in 1563, mentions Young debating with Cranmer (1563, p. 933)].

According to Foxe, Young was present when William Glynn visited Ridley and asked Ridley's forgiveness for having spoken to him disrespectfully during Ridley's disputation on 17 April 1554 (1563, p. 971; 1570, p. 1618; 1576, p. 1380; 1583, p. 1451).

During Easter week William Wolsey conferred with Fuller, Christopherson and Dr Young. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Young told Wolsey that laymen should not meddle with scripture, to which Wolsey counter-argued using scripture. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Young was one of those who put the common seal of the University of Cambridge to the condemnation of Bucer and Phagius. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

John Young was present for the judgement against Bucer and Phagius on 17 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

When the commission found no witnesses to support Bucer and Phagius, they called aside DrsYoung, Sedgwick, Bullock, Taylor, Maptide, Hunter, Parker, Redman, as well as Brown, Gogman, Rud, Johnson, Mitch, Raven and Carre. They were all commanded to give witness against Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

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On 14 January 1557, after the examination of the provost and vice-provost of Cambridge, Thomas Bacon invited Perne, Dr Young, Dr Harvey, Swinborne, and Maptide to come to dinner. His examination took place before Scot, Watson and Christopherson on 14 January 1557. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

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John Hullier appeared before Shaxton, Young, Segewick, Scot, Mitch and others on Palm Sunday eve at Great St Mary's. 1570, p. 2196, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2004.

 
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Laurence Saunders

(d. 1555) [DNB]

Martyr.

Saunders' life and career are described. 1563; pp. 1037-38; 1570, pp. 1664-65; 1576, p. 1420; 1583, pp. 1493-94.

Laurence Saunders preached in Northampton, soon after Mary's accession, denouncing 'Antichrist's errors'. He was arrested and released. He came to London, despite warnings to the contrary. 1563, pp. 1038-39; 1570, p. 1665; 1576, pp. 1420-21; 1583, p. 1494.

On 15 October 1553, Saunders preached at Allhallows, Bread Street, denouncing the mass as an abomination. On the same day he was summoned by Bonner, interrogated, and committed to the Marshalsea. 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466; also 1563, p. 1039; 1570, p.1665; 1576, p. 1421; 1583, pp. 1494-95.

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He was interrogated by Gardiner and imprisoned. 1563, pp. 1041-42; 1570, pp. 1665-66; 1576, p. 1421; 1583; p. 1495.

It was rumoured in May 1554 that he, along with Bradford and John Rogers, would participate in a disputation to be held at Cambridge (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

Saunders was one of the signatories to a letter of 8 May 1554 protesting against the proposed disputation. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71).

Saunders was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for a chance to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

His letters and examinations: 1563, pp. 1040-47; 1570, pp. 1666-70; 1576, pp. 1421-25; 1583, pp. 1495-98.

Saunders was excommunicated at 6am on 23 January 1555. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1787, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1609.

Saunders was examined and condemned by Stephen Gardiner on 30 January 1555. 1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483; also see 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24.

He was degraded, conveyed to Coventry and executed there. 1563, pp. 1047-48; 1570, pp. 1665-66; 1576, p. 1421; 1583, p. 1495.

Saunders is contrasted with Henry Pendleton. 1563, p. 1049; 1570, p. 1671; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, pp. 1499-1500.

Additional letters: 1570, pp. 1671-74; 1576, pp. 1426-29; 1583, pp. 1500-2.

Lawrence Saunders was imprisoned in the Marshalsea at the same time as Bradford was imprisoned [in the King's Bench] and often met with Bradford at the back of the prison. 1563, p. 1174, 1570, p. 1780, 1576, p. 1521, 1583, p. 1604.

His martyrdom was referred to in Bradford's letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09., 1576, p. 1545, 1583, p. 1627.

He received a letter from Bradford. 1563, p. 1194, 1570, p. 1815, 1576, pp. 1550-51, 1583, p. 1633.

He received another letter from Bradford. 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Saunders was described as a faithful witness of Christ by Robert Glover in a letter to his wife. 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. Ridley mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote the letter. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

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Letter to evangelicals in Lichfield [BL, Harley 416, fos.13v-16r. Printed in LM, pp. 182-88.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Leonard Pollard

(d. 1556) [DNB]

Leonard Pollard preached a sermon at St Michael?s, Cambridge, on 6 November 1553, affirming doctrines of purgatory (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1416).

 
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Lord William Dacres (of Gilsland)

(1500 - 1563)

Accompanied Mary to Westminister Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576,p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Edward Stanley, the 3rd Earl of Derby, stated that he, Dacres and Lord Windsor had never consented to the religious laws of Edward VI (1570, p. 1734; 1576, p. 1481; 1583, p. 1564).

Foxe calls him Lord Dacars.

 
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Lord William Howard [or Haward]

(1510? - 1573)

First Baron Howard of Effingham. (DNB)

William Howard accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He was sent to bring Princess Elizabeth to London on 11 February 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1466).

Howard was kind and gentle to princess Elizabeth when he met with her at Hampton Court the day before Stephen Gardiner requested her to submit to Mary's authority. His kindness gave her much comfort. 1563, p. 1715, 1570, p. 2294, 1576, p. 1986, 1583, p. 2292.

William Howard was one of the examiners of John Rogers on 22 January 1555. 1563, pp. 1023-26; 1570, pp. 1657-59; 1576, pp. 1414-15; 1583, pp. 1484-86.

He was appointed to carry news of Mary's (anticipated) safe delivery of a child to Charles V. 1583, p. 1577.

A letter regarding Green's treason was sent to Bonner by the privy council on 11 November 1555 but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed by Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely, William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

[Foxe calls him Lord 'Haward'.]

 
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Miles Coverdale

(1488 - 1568)

Evangelist, Bible translator, Bishop of Exeter (1551 - 1553) (DNB)

Miles Coverdale associated with John Rogers and William Tyndale in translating the Bible (1563, p. 1022; 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1484).

He was ordered to attend the Privy Council on 22 August 1553 (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

On 31 August, Coverdale appeared before the Privy Council and on the next day was commanded to await their pleasure (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

According to Foxe, he wrote a confutation of Weston's Paul's Cross sermon of 20 October 1553. Foxe claimed that he possessed a copy of Coverdale's confutation; it has not survived (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; and 1583, p. 1466).

Coverdale was a signatory to the letter of 8 May 1554 protesting the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41 [Coverdale's signature is on p. 1642]; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; and 1583, p. 1469-71.

Coverdale sent Rowland Taylor a cap to wear at his execution (1570, p. 1704; 1576, p. 1454; 1583, p. 1557).

Throughout 1554, Christian III of Denmark repeatedly requested that Mary release Coverdale from custody and send him to Denmark. Although Mary was reluctant to grant the request, eventually she agreed, sending Coverdale to Denmark in February 1555 (1563, pp. 1081-83; 1570, pp. 1706-7; 1576, pp. 1456-57; 1583, pp. 1529-31).

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Richard Grafton

(d. 1573)

Protestant printer. Of London. [See E. G. Duff, A Century of the English Book Trade: Short Notices of All Printers, Stationers, Book-binders, and Others Connected with it from the Issue of the First Dated Book in 1457 to the Incorporation of the Company of Stationers in 1557 (London, 1948), p. 59.]

Richard Grafton was exempted from Mary's coronation pardon, 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Richard Waterson was examined by Story where he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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Robert Holgate

(1481? - 1555)

Archbishop of York (1545 - 1554) (DNB)

Committed to the Tower, 4 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Roland Swynborne

(d. 1557)

Master of Clare College, Cambridge (1539 - 1549; 1553 - 1557) [Venn]

Roland Swynborne replaced John Madew as Master of Clare; Madew was discharged by John Young on 26 October 1553 because he was married (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; and 1583, p. 1466).

Swynborne was one of those who put the common seal of the University of Cambridge to the condemnation of Bucer and Phagius. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

On 14 January 1557, after the examination of the provost and vice-provost of Cambridge, Bacon invited Perne, Dr Young, Dr Harvey, Swynborne, and Maptide to come to dinner. He was examined before Scot, Watson and Christopherson on 14 January 1557. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

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He was so alarmed by Ormaneto's discussion with Brassey on 22 January 1557 that he found himself unable to speak. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1961.

 
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Sir Fulke Greville

(d. 1559)

Lord Willoughby [DNB entry for his grandson of the same name]

Accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Sir John Pollard

(d. 1557) (DNB)

Speaker in the House of Commons (1553–55)

5 October 1553, chosen speaker of the House of Commons (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Sir William Paget

(by 1506 - 1563 )

Lord Paget of Beaudesert (1549). Lord Privy Seal (1556 - 1558). MP (unknown constituency - 1529), Middlesex (1545), Staffordshire (1547). Secretary to Jane Seymour and Anne of Cleves (1537 and 1540). High Steward of Cambridge University (1547 - 1553). [Bindoff; DNB]

William Paget accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He signed a royal dispensation of 5 August 1550 which permitted Hooper to be consecrated without having to wear vestments (1563, p. 1050; 1570, p. 1676; 1576, p. 1403 [recte 1430]; 1583, p. 1504).

On 7 November 1554, he was sent as an ambassador 'I know not whither, but it was thought to be to escort Pole to England', (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, pp. 1473-74).

He was one of John Roger's examiners on 22 January 1555 (1563, pp. 1023-26; 1570, pp. 1657-59;1576, pp. 1414-15; 1583, pp. 1484-86).

Lord Paget delivered Stephen Gardiner to Bonner. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Cheke had safe passage from King Philip, with Lord Paget and Sir John Mas securing their safety. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

Having seen Paget safely off to England, Carew and Cheke were taken en route between Brussels and Antwerp. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

John Mason warned Richard Bertie and his wife Katherine that Lord Paget was on his way under a false pretence and that the duke of Brunswick was nearby in the service of the house of Austria against the French king. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Vaux

(1510 - 1556) (DNB)

2nd Baron Vaux of Harrowden

Accompanied Queen to Westminster, 1 October 1553. (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

Spelt 'Vaus' by Foxe.

 
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Thomas Wentworth

(1525 - 1584)

2nd Baron Wentworth of Nettlestead (DNB)

Accompanied Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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William Somerset

(1526 - 1589

3rd Earl of Worcester (DNB)

Accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

 
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Cambridge St Michael
NGR: TL 464 585 (Cambridge)

A perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Ely and in the patronage of the Master and Fellows of Trinity College. The church stands on the east side of Trumpington Street, opposite to Caius College.

Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

 
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Cherry Hinton, Cambridgeshire
NGR: TL 485 565

Parish in the Hundred of Flendish, Cambridgeshire. 2.75 miles east by south from Cambridge. A discharged vicarage in the archdeaconry and diocese of Ely.

Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

 
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Gray [Gry]

nr Besancon, Franche-Comté, France

Coordinates: 47° 27' 0" N, 5° 35' 0" E

1490 [1466]

Queene Mary. Thinges done the 1. yeare of Q. Mary. Queene Maryes parliament.

MarginaliaAnn. 1454.. Aprill. MarginaliaThis Mōke was Doct. Thornton, a cruell murtherer of Gods people. Of whose horrible end ye shal read hereafter, and partely also in the life of Cranmer.bling monke,which caused Masse to be st vp there without mine aduise or Counsell: Reddat illi Dominus in die illo. And as for offering my selfe to say Masse before the Queenes highnesse or in any other place, I neuer did it, as her grace well knoweth. But if her grace will geue me leaue, I shalbe ready to prooue, against all that will saye the contrary, that all that is contained in the holy Communion set out by the most innocent and godly Prince king Edward the 6. in his high court of Parliament, is conformable to that order which our Sauiour Christ did both obserue and commaund to be obserued, & which his Apostles & primatiue church vsed many yeares, whereas the Masse in many things not onely hath no foundation of Christe, his Apostles, nor the primatiue Church, but is manifestly contrary to the same, and cōtaineth many horrible abuses in it. And although many, either vnlearned or malitious, do report that M. Peter Martyr is vnlearned, yet if the Queenes highnes wil graunt thereunto, I with the sayde M. Peter Martyr, and other 4. or 5. whiche I shall chuse, will by Gods grace take vppon vs to defende, not onely the common praiers of the Church, the ministration of the Sacraments, and other rites & ceremonies, but also al the doctrine and religion set out by our said soueraigne Lord king Edward the 6. to be more pure and according to Gods worde, then any other that hath bene vsed in England these 1000. yeares: so that Gods word may be iudge, & that the reasons and proufes of both parties may be sette out in wryting, to the intent, as well that all the worlde maye examine and iudge thereon, as that no man shall start backe from his wrytinge. And where they boast of the faith that hath bene in the Churche these 1500. yeres, we will ioyne with them in this poynt, and that the same doctrine and vsage, is to be followed, whiche was in the Church. 1500. yeres past, and we shall prooue that the order of the Churche, set out at this present in this Realme by Acte of Parlament, is the same that was vsed in the Church. 1500. yeres past, & so shall they be neuer able to prooue theirs.

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The same Thursday beinge the 7. of Septemb. Lorde Mountacute chiefe Iustice, and Lorde chiefe Baron were deliuered out of the Tower.

 

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Cattley/Pratt, VI, 540, fn 1


Stow says the 14th of September. - ED.
Appendix:The Council Book says: "At Westminster the xiij. day of September, 1553. This daye Mr. Hugh Lattymer clercke appeared before the lordes, and for his seditious demeanor was comitted to the Towere, there to remaine a close prisoner, havinge attendinge upon him one Austy his servante ... The archbishop of Canterbury appearing this day before the lords, was commaunded to appere the next day before them at afternoon, at the Star Chamber."

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The 13. of September the reuerende father M. Hughe Latimer was committed to the Tower.

 

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Cattley/Pratt, VI, 540, fn 2

Sept. 15, according to Stow. - ED.

Appendix:The Council Book says: "At the Starre Chamber the xiiij. of September ano. 1553. This presente daye Thomas archbishoppe of Canterburye appeared before the Lordes (as he was the daye before appoynted): after longe and serious debatynge of his Offence by the whole boarde, it was thoughte convenyente that as well for the Treason committed by him againste the Queene's Matie as for the aggravatynge of the same his offence, by spreadinge aboute seditious Billes movinge tumultes to the disquietnes of the presente State, he should be comitted to the Towere, there to remayne and be referred to Justyce or furthere ordered as shall stande with the Queen's pleasure." The Harleian MS. mis-copies the date of this entry "the viij of September," whence it is so printed in the Archæologia, vol. xviii. p. 175.

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The 14. of Septemb. the bishop of Caunterburye was committed to the Tower.

The 26. of September, one Maister Graye of Cambridge called before hym one M. Garth, for that he would not suffer a boy of Peter house to helpe hym say Masse in Penbroke hal, which was before any law was established for that behalfe.

The Queene came to the Tower of London vpon the Thursday being the 28. of September, and vpon the Saterday following, shee rode from the Tower thorough the Citie of London, where were made many Pageants MarginaliaAmongest these Pageantes stood a certaine man vpon the top of the Eagle vpon Paules steeple with a flagge in his hand.to receiue her, and so was triumphantly brought to Westminster to White hall.

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Vppon the Sonday being the first day of October, the Queenes highnesse went from White hall to Westminster Abbey, accompanied wyth the most part of the Nobility of this Realme, namelye these: The Duke of Norfolke, the Earle of Arundell, the Earle of Shrewsburie, the Marques of Winchester, the Earls of Darby,, Bedford, Worcester, Cumberland, Westmerland, Oxford, Sussex, Deuonshire, Penbroke, the Lord Dacres of the North, Lord Ferris, Lorde Cobham, Lord Aburgeiny, Lord Wentwoorth,, Lord Scroupe, Lord Rich, Lord Vaus, Lorde Hawarde, Lord Conias, Lord Morley, Lorde Paget, and the Lorde Willowbye, with many other Nobles, and all the Embassadours of diuers countreys, the Maior of London wyth all the Aldermen. Also out of the Abbey to receiue her comming, came three siluer Crosses, and to the number of four score or neare vppon, of singing men, all in very rich & gorgeous coapes. Amongest whom were the Deane of Westminster, and diuers of her Chaplaines, which bare euerye one some ensigne in their handes, and after them followed 10. Byshops mytred all, and their Croyser staues in theyr handes, and rich Copes vpon them euery one. And in this order they returned frō Westminster hal, before the Quene to the Abbey, MarginaliaQ. Mary crowned. Doctor dayes Sermon.where she was crowned by Steuen Gardiner Bishop of Winchester, and Lorde Chancellor of England. At the time of the Coronation Doctour Day Bishop of Chichester made a sermon to the Queenes maiestie, and to the rest of the nobilitie.

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MarginaliaGenerall pardon at the Queens Coronatiō. Exempted out of the Pardon.Also there was a generall Pardon proclaimed wythin the Abbey at the sayd time of her Coronation, out of which Proclamation all the prisonners of the Tower and of the Flete were excepted, and 62. more. Wherof M. Whitchurch and M. Grafton were two.

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The thirde of October, the Vicechauncellour of Cambridge did chalenge one M. Pierson, for that hee ministred still the Communion in his owne Parish, and did receyue

straungers of other Parishes to the same, and woulde not say masse. Whereupon within 2. dayes after, he was cleane discharged from farther ministring in his Cure.

Vppon the Wedensday following, the Archb. of Yorke was committed to the Tower.

MarginaliaQ. Mary rideth to the Parliament houseVppon Thursdaye being the 5. of October. 1553. the Queene road to the Parliament in her roabes, and all the nobilitie with her, and when they were set in the Parliament house, the Bishop of Winchester made to them a solemne Oration, and MarginaliaSergeant Pollard speaker in the Parliament.Sergeant Pollarde was chosen speaker of the Parliament. The same day the Bishops of Lincolne, Harford, and Westchester, were discharged from the Parliament and Conuocation.

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MarginaliaThe Earle of Huntington deliuered out of the Tower.Also the 10. daye of October, the Earle of Huntington was deliuered out of the Tower.

MarginaliaM. Saunders for preaching agaynst the Masse committed to the Marshalsey.Vpon the Sonday after, being the 15. of Oct. 

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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 541, line 13

See this paragraph confirmed at p. 614.

M. Laurence Saunders preached at Alhallowes in Breadstreete in þe morning: where he declared the abhomination of the masse, with diuers other matters very notably, and godly. Wherof more shalbe heard (by the Lordes leaue) heereafter when we come to his story. In which his doing, as he shewed himselfe to be Gods faithful minister, so is he sure not to be defrauded of gods faithful promise, who sayth: Omnis qui confitebitur me coram hominibus, confitebor & ego illum coram patre meo qui est in cœlis. Math. 10. But about noone of the same day he was sent for by the bishop of London, and from thence committed to the Marshalsee.

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MarginaliaD. Westons popish Sermon at Paules.Vpon the Sonday folowing, being the 20. of October, 

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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix, page 541, line 24

{Cattley/Pratt alters '20' to '22' in the text.} As October 15th, mentioned above, certainly fell on a Sunday in 1553, Foxe's "20" must be a misprint for "22:" but it so stands in all the editions. The next paragraph states, that the week following the disputations began in the Convocation: these were appointed to commence on Friday, Oct. 20th, but they did not actually commence till Monday the 23d (see pp. 396, 397): and it is very natural to suppose that Weston would improve the intervening Sunday, Oct. 22d, to prepossess the minds of the public.

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Doctor Weston preached at Paules Crosse. 
Commentary  *  Close

The account of Weston's Paul Cross sermon of 22 October 1553 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466) was clearly based on someone's notes. (By the way, Foxe refers to a rebuttal of this sermon by Coverdale; this has not survived).

Who in the beginning of his Sermone willed the people to praye for the soules departed on this wise: You shall pray for all them þt be departed, that be neither in heauē, nor hell, but in a place not yet sufficiently purged to come to heauē, that they may be releued by your deuout prayers. He named the Lordes table an oyster board. He said that the Catechisme in Latin, lately sette out, was abhominable heresie, & likened the setters out of the same Catechisme to Iulianus Apostata, and the booke for a Dialogue set out by the sayd Iulianus Apostata, wherein Christ and Pilate were the speakers: with many other things. MarginaliaWestons sermon confuted by M. Couerdalle.Which Sermon with al the poynts therof, maister Couerdall the same time learnedly confuted by wryting, which remaineth yet in my handes to be seene.

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In the weeke following, began the disputations in the conuocation house in Paules Churche, whereof sufficient hath bene before declared, pag. 1342.

The 26. day of October, the Vicechauncellour of Cambridge went to Clarehall, and in the presence of Doctoure Walker, displaced Doctour Madewe, and placed Maister Swynborne in the Maistership there, by force of the Lorde Chauncellours letters, for that he was (as they termed it,) Vxoratus, that is, maried.

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The 28. day of October, the Papistes in the kings colledge in Cambridge ( MarginaliaRunning before the law.not tarying the making of any lawe, but of their blinde zeale) had their whole seruice againe in the Latin tong, contrary to the law then in force.

The last of October, the Vicechauncelloure of Cambridge, did sharpely reprooue and threaten one M. Thrackold, for that he challenged the sayd Vicechauncellor, who had suffered maister Bouell (contrary to the statutes then in force) quietly wythout punishment to depart, notwithstanding that he refused to sweare to the supremacie of the Queene, and the abrogation of the bishop of Rome. MarginaliaThe Queenes proceedinges maintained in Cambridge before the law.

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The third day of Nouember, the Vicechauncellor sent for the Curate of the rounde Parish in Cambridge, 

Commentary  *  Close

The curate of the Round Parish (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466) was the curate of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Cambridge, which is round rather than cruciform in shape.

 
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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 542, line 4

By the "Round parish in Cambridge" is doubtless meant the Round Church, as it is still popularly called.

commaunding hym not to minister any more in the English toung, saying: he would haue one vniforme order of seruice throughoute the Towne, and that in Latine, wyth Masse, which was established the xij. day of this moneth.

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The 6. day of Nouember, M. Pollarde preached at S. Michaels, and in his Sermon approoued Purgatorie.

The 28. day of Nouember, the Archdeacons Officiall visited in Hynton, where hee gaue in charge to present all suche as did disturbe the Queenes proceedings, in letting the Latine seruice, the setting vp of their altars, and saying of Masse, or any parte thereof: whereby it was easie to see how these good fellowes ment to proceede, hauing the law once on their side, that thus readely against a manifest law would attempt the punishment of any man.

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The 15. day of December, there was two Proclamations at London: MarginaliaK. Edwardes Actes repealed.the one for the repealing of certaine actes made by kynge Edwarde, and for the setting vppe of the Masse, for the 20. day of December then next folowing: the other was, that no man should interrupt any of those that would say Masse.

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The Parliament beginning about the v. daye of October, continued till the fifth of December. In the whyche Parliament were dissolued as well all Statutes made of Premunire, in the time of King Henrie viij. &c. as also other

lawes
PPPp.iij.
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