Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCommentary on the GlossesCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward Brocket

(1490/91 - 1558/69)

JP, MP and Sheriff of Essex and Herts. (1547 - 1548 and 1554 - 1555) [Bindoff, Commons]

Brocket escorted Rowland Taylor across Essex on Taylor's journey to Hadleigh for execution. He threatened Arthur Faysie with imprisonment when Faysie attempted to speak with Taylor and called Taylor 'a true man'. Brocket forced Taylor to wear a hood after this encounter. At a dinner on the journey, Brocket tried to persuade Taylor to recant but Taylor put him off with a jest. 1563, p. 1077; 1570, p. 1701; 1576, p. 1452; 1583, pp. 1525-26.

[Back to Top]

He supervised the burning of William Hunter. 1570, p. 1715; 1576, p. 1464; 1583, p. 1538.

He conveyed Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed to their executions. 1563, p. 1108; 1570, p. 1719; 1576, p. 1468; 1583, p. 1542.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Laurence

(d. 1555)

Former Dominican; at Sudbury Convent when it was dissolved in 1538 [Emden, 1501-40].

Foxe mentions that John Laurence was examined by Bishop Bonner on 8 February 1555; he was condemned by Bonner on 9 February 1555. 1570, p. 1705; 1576, p. 1456; 1583, p. 1529.

Articles objected against John Laurence on 8 February 1555: 1563, pp. 1111-12; 1570, p. 1720; 1576, pp. 1468-69; 1583, p. 1542.

Laurence was examined, formally and informally, by Bonner on 9 February 1555. He declared to Bonner that he had been ordained as a priest eighteen years previously, that he had been a Dominican and that he was engaged to be married. He also denied the Real Presence, declaring that the eucharist was a remembrance of Christ's body. 1563, p. 1112; 1570, p. 1721; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543.

[Back to Top]

He was condemned and degraded on 9 February 1555 and sent to Newgate. 1563, p. 1112; 1570, p. 1721; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543.

John Laurence was executed in Colchester on 29 March 1555. Because of physical infirmity, he was carried to the stake in a chair. Children shouted encouragement to him as he was burning. 1563, p. 1113; 1570, p. 1721; 1576, pp. 1469-70; 1583, p. 1543.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Anthony Browne

(1509/10 - 1567)

JP, MP for Lostwithel (1545), Great Bedwyn (1547), Preston (1553), Scarborough (1554), Maldon (1554). Sergeant-at-law and Mary's sergeant (1555). Chief Justice of the Common Pleas (1558 - 1559) and Justice of the Common Pleas (1559 - 1567). A leading early Elizabethan recusant [Bindoff, Commons, sub 'Browne, Anthony II'; DNB].

[Back to Top]

Sir Anthony Browne was instructed, in a letter of 19 August, to imprison those who criticised the 'Queenes order of religion' or did not attend mass and to report their names to the privy council. 1583, p. 1765. [Foxe's account was taken from APC V, p. 63, but Foxe misdated the incident to 1553; the Privy Council Register says 1554].

[Back to Top]

He threatened to send William Hunter's father to prison if William did not surrender himself. He interrogated William Hunter, became enraged with Hunter and sent Hunter to Bishop Bonner. 1570, pp. 1713-14; 1576, pp. 1462-63; 1583, pp. 1536-37.

He complained about the lack of wood at William Hunter's execution. He told Hunter that he would no more pray for him than for a dog. 1570, p. 1715; 1576, p. 1464; 1583, p. 1538.

He had Robert Hunter imprisoned in the stocks and then interrogated. 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

He was one of the commissioners who examined Thomas Wattes on 26 April 1555. He sent him to Bishop Bonner on 27 April to be tried for heresy. 1563, pp. 1162-63 and 1165-66; 1570, pp. 1769-70; 1576, p. 1511; 1583, pp. 1594-95

He was present at the execution of Thomas Higbed. 1570, p. 1720; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1542.

Anthony Brown persecuted George Eagles. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Rumours were raised in Chelmsford that Justice Brown had falsely accused diverse honest men who had kept Eagles safe in their houses, in order to discredit Eagles. Someone named Reynold of Chelmsford witnessed this to be false report. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Sir Anthony Hungerford sought the advice of justice Brown on how he should act towards Richard White and John Hunt. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

[NB: Anthony Browne named Sir Edward Saunders as one of the overseers of his will (Bindoff, Commons).]

[NB: Do not confuse this Anthony Browne with Sir Anthony Browne, Viscount Montague - they are not the same person.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Stephen Knight

(d. 1555)

Barber; martyr

Foxe mentions that Stephen Knight was examined by Bishop Bonner on 8 February 1555; he was condemned by Bonner on 9 February 1555. 1570, p. 1705; 1576, p. 1456; 1583, p. 1529.

Articles were objected against Knight on 8 February 1555. 1563, pp. 1111-12; 1570, p. 1720; 1576, pp. 1468-69; 1583, p. 1542. Answers to these articles: 1563, p. 1112; 1570, p. 1720; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, pp. 1542-43.

Knight, examined by Bonner on 9 February 1555, refused to recant. 1563, p. 1112; 1570, pp. 1720-21; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543. He was condemned by Bonner on 9 February and sent to Newgate. 1563, p. 1112; 1570, p. 1721; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543.

He was taken to Malden, Essex, and executed there on 28 March 1555. He said a prayer at the stake which Foxe reprints. 1563, pp. 1112-13; 1570, p. 1721; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543.

Bonner asked Thomas Hawkes if he knew Stephen Knight or William Pygot; Hawkes replied that he knew Knight but not Pygot (1563, p. 1148; 1570, p. 1758; 1576, p. 1500 [recte 1502]; 1583, p. 1586).

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Pygot

(d. 1555)

Butcher and martyr

Foxe mentions that Pygot was examined by Bishop Bonner on 8 February 1555; he was condemned by Bonner on 9 February 1555. 1570, p. 1705; 1576, p. 1456; 1583, p. 1529.

Articles were objected against Pygot on 8 February 1555. 1563, pp. 1111-12; 1570, p. 1720; 1576, pp. 1468-69; 1583, p. 1542. Answers to these articles: 1563, p. 1112; 1570, p. 1720; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, pp. 1542-43.

Pygot was examined by Bonner on 9 February 1555; he refused to recant. 1563, p. 1112; 1570, pp. 1720-21; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543.

He was condemned by Bonner on 9 February and sent to Newgate. 1563, p. 1112; 1570, p. 1721; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543.

He was taken to Braintree, Essex, and executed there on 28 March 1555. He said a prayer at the stake which Foxe presents. 1563, pp. 1112-13; 1570, p. 1721; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543.

On 3 May 1555, the Privy Council ordered the arrest of two men who were carrying Pygot's bones through the Essex countryside and displaying them to people (1583, p. 1577).

Bonner asked Thomas Hawkes if he knew either Stephen Knight or Pygot; Hawkes responded that he knew Knight but not Pygot (1563, p. 1148; 1570, p. 1758; 1576, p. 1550 [recte 1502]; 1583, p. 1586).

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Horndon-on-the-Hill
NGR: TQ 669 833

A parish in the hundred of Barnstaple, county of Essex. 16.5miles south by west from Chelmsford. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Essex, Diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
1566 [1542]

Queene Mary. William Pigot, Stephen Knight, Iohn Laurence, martyrs.

MarginaliaAnn. 1555. March. be read. MarginaliaSentence pronounced agaynst M. Causton & M. Higbed. In the reading whereof Higbed sayd: Ye speake blasphemie against Christes passion, and ye goe aboute to trap vs with your subtilties and snares. And though my father and mother, and other my kinsfolke, did beleeue as you say, yet they were deceiued in so beleeuing.

[Back to Top]

And further, where you say, that my Lord, named Cranmer (late Archbishop of Canterbury) and other specified in the said articles be heretickes: I do wishe that I were such an hereticke as they were and be. Then the Byshop asked him againe, whether he would turne from his errour, and come to the vnitie of their Church? To whome he sayde, No, I would ye should recant, for I am in the truth, and you in errour.

[Back to Top]

Well, quoth the Byshop, if ye will returne, I will gladly receiue you.

No, sayd Higbed, I will not returne as you wyll haue me, to beleeue in the sacrament of the altar your God.

MarginaliaM. Causton & M. Higbed condēned and sēt to Newgate. Whereupon the Byshop proceeded, and gaue iudgement vpon him, as he had done before vpon Tho. Causton. When all this was thus ended, they were both deliuered to the Sheriffes, and so by them sent to Newgate, where they remained by the space of xiiij. dayes, praysed be God, not so much in afflictions, as in consolations.

[Back to Top]

For the encrease whereof, they earnestly desired all their good brethren and sisterne in Christ to pray, that God for his sonnes sake would go forth with that great mercy, which already he had begon in them, so that they might perseuere vnto the ende, to the prayse of the eternall God, and comfort of all their brethren.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaM. Causton and Maister Higbed brought frō Newgate into Essex.These xiiij. dayes (after their condemnation) once expired, they were the xxiij. day of this moneth of March, fetched from Newgate at foure of the clocke in the morning, and so led through the Citie vnto Algate, where they were deliuered vnto the Sheriffe of Essex, and there beeing fast bound in a cart, were shortly after brought to their seuerall appointed places of burning: that is to saye, Thomas Higbed to Horneden on the hill, and Thomas Causton to Rayly (both in the Countrey of Essex) where they did most constantly, the xxvj. day  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 737, line 10

The first edition reads "xxv."

of the same MarginaliaMarch 26. moneth, seale this their faith with shedding of their bloud by most cruell fire, to the glory of God, and great reioysing of the godly. MarginaliaThe constāt Martirdome of M. Thomas Caustō, and Maister Higbed Martyrs.

[Back to Top]

At the burning of whiche, Mayster Higbed, Iustice Browne was also present, as is aboue specified, and diuers Gentlemen in the shiere were commaunded to be present, for feare belike, least they should be taken from them. And thus much touching the apprehension, examination, confession, condemnation, and burnyng of these two godly and constant Martyrs of God.

[Back to Top]
William Pigot, Steuen Knight, and Iohn Laurance, with their exanation and constant martirdome.  
Commentary  *  Close
The Martyrdoms of Pygot, Knight and Laurence

All the information which Foxe had on these martyrs in the Rerum was acopy of Stephen Knight's prayers and the dates and places of the execution of the three martyrs, together with a brief but vivid account of Laurence being carried to the stake in a chair (Rerum, pp. 427 and 428). In the 1563 edition, Foxe added the articles put to the three and their answers, as well as accounts of the appearance before the Consistory Court of St Paul's. He also added the unforgettable story of children encouraging Laurence to remain constant, as he was burning alive, to his first edition. There were no significant changes made to the account of thesethree martyrs in subsequent editions of the Acts and Monuments.

[Back to Top]

 

Commentary on the Glosses  *  Close
Pigot, Knight and Laurence

Narrative dominates the glosses in this section, along with an account of the issues discussed between the martyrs and their persecutors. As is usual, the day of death is given at the start (for two of the martyrs who died on the same day). The gloss 'Beliefe of the pretensed Catholicke church' qualifies the term 'catholic': the term was thus not always to be conceded to the other side without comment. The glosses remind the reader that Laurence was a priest and register the fact of his conversion from monastic life to protestantism ('Talke betweene Boner and Iohn Laurence Priest'; 'Iohn Laurence sometymes a Fryer'; 'The Martyrdome of Iohn Laurence Priest at Colchester. Anno. 1555'), illustrating that even those at the heart of the pope's church could see the truth if they wished.

[Back to Top]
MarginaliaMarch. 28. IN the Story before of Thomas Tomkins and his fellowes, mention was made of sixe, which were examined, and condemned together, by bishop Boner, the ninth day of February. Of the which sixe condemned persons, two, which were Tomkins, and William Hunter, (as ye heard) were executed, the one vppon the 26. of February, and the other vppon the 26. day of March. MarginaliaW. Pigot, Ste. Knight, Iohn Laurence, Martyrs. Other three, to witte, William Pigot and Steuen Knight suffered vpon the eight and twenty day, and Iohn Laurence the nine and twenty of the sayd month of march.

[Back to Top]

Touching the which three Martyrs, now something to say of their examinations, it was first demaunded of them, what their opiniō was of the sacrament of the Aultar. Whereunto they seuerally answered, and also subscribed, that in the sacrament of the aultar, vnder formes of bread and wine there is not the very substaunce of the body and bloud of our sauiour Iesus Christ, but a special partaking of the body and bloud of Christ: the very body and bloud of Christ being onely in heauen, and no where els. This answere thus made, the bishop caused certayne articles to be read vnto them, tending to the same effect as did the articles before of Tomkins and of M. Causton. The tenour whereof here followeth.

[Back to Top]
Articles or interrogatories obiected by the bishop of London, to William Pigot, Steuen Kight, and Iohn Laurence, the 8. of February. 1555.  
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of the appearances of Pygot, Knight and Laurence before the Consistory Court of St Paul's as well as the articles put to them, together with their answers, are all taken from Bishop Bonner's records, probably from a court book which is now lost.

MarginaliaArticles obiected to W. Pigot & his fellowes. WHether do you thinke and steadfastly beleeue that it is a catholicke, faithfull, christian, and true doctrine, to teach, preach and say, that in the sacramentes of the aultar, vnder þe formes of bread & wine, there is wtout any substance of bread & wine there remayning, by þe omnipotent

[Back to Top]

power of almightye God, & his holy worde, really, truely, and in very deede the true and natural body and bloud of our Sauiour Iesus Christ, the selfe same in substaunce (though not in outward forme and appearaunce) whiche was borne of the Virgine Mary, and suffered vppon the crosse, yea, or nay?

MarginaliaBeliefe of their forelders. Whether doe you thinke, and steadfastly beleeue that your Parentes, kinsfolke, frendes, and acquaintance, here in this realm of England, before your birth a great while and also after your Birth, professing and beleuing the said doctrine and fayth, concerning the sayd sacrament of the aultar, had a true christian fayth, and were faythfull and true christen people, or no?

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaBeliefe of their godfathers and godmothers. Whether do you think and steadfastly beleue that your Godfathers and Godmother, professing and beleuing the said Doctrine and faith, concerning the sayde Sacrament of the aultar, had a true christen fayth, and were faythfull and true christen people or no?

MarginaliaBeliefe of their young age. Whether do you think and steadfastly beleue that your own self in times past, being of the age of 14. yeares, and aboue, did thinke and beleue concerning the sayd sacrament of the aulter in all poyntes, as your sayde parentes: kinsfolke, friendes, acquaintaunce, godfathers, and godmother did then thinke and beleue them, or no?

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaBeliefe of the king, and Queene, & the Nobilitie. Whether doe you thinke, and steadfastly beleeue that oure Soueraignes the king, and the Queene of thys Realme of England, and all the Nobilitie, Clergie, and Laitie of this Realm, professing and beleuing the said doctrine and fayth, as other christian Realmes doe, concerning the sayd sacrament of the altar, haue a true christian fayth, and beleeue as the Catholicke and true Churche of Christ hath alwayes beleued, preached, and taught or no?

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaBeliefe of the pretensed Catholicke church. Whether do ye thinke and steadfastly beleeue that our sauiour Christ and his holy spirite hath bene, is, and shalbe with his Catholicke churche, euen to the worldes end, gouerning and ruling the same in all thinges, especially in the necessary poyntes of Christian Religion, not suffering the same to erre or to be deceiued therein?

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe reall presence and transubstantiation. Whether it is true that you, being suspected, or infamed to be culpable, and faultie in speaking agaynst the sacrament of the Aultare, and agaynst the very true presence of Christes naturall body, and the substaunce thereof in þe sayd sacrament, and thereupon called before mee vppon complaynt made to me agaynst you, haue not bene a good space in my house, hauing freely meate and drinke, and also diuers times instructed and informed, as well by one being our Ordinary, as also by my chaplaines and dyuers other learned men, some wherof were bishops, some Deanes, and some Archdeacons, and euery one of them learned in diuinitie, and minding well vnto you, and desiring the safegard of your soule, and that you should folow and beleue the doctrine of the Catholicke church as afore, concerning the sayd sacrament of the aultar, and whether you did not at al times since your sayd comming to me, vtterly refuse to follow and beleue the sayd doctrine, concerning the sayd sacrament?

[Back to Top]

Whether can you nowe finde in your hart and conscience to conforme your selfe in all poyntes to the said fayth and catholicke church concerning the sayde Sacrament of the aultar, faythfully, truely, and playnely, without anye dissimulation, beleeuing therein as our sayd soueraignes, with the Nobilitie, Clergie, and Laytie, of this Realme, and other Christian realmes: and other persons aforesaid, and also the sayd Catholicke Church haue, and do beleue in that behalfe?

[Back to Top]

In case you so cānot, what ground haue you to mayntaine your opinion, and who is of the same opinion wyth you, and what conference haue you had therein with any, what comfort and what reliefe haue you had therein by any of them, and what are their names and surnames, and their dwelling place?

Their aunsweres to these articles were not much discrepant from Tomkins, and other like Martirs aboue mentioned, as here followeth to be seene.

¶ The aunswere of Steuen Knight, and William Pigot, to the aforesayd Articles.  
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of the appearances of Pygot, Knight and Laurence before the Consistory Court of St Paul's as well as the articles put to them, together with their answers, are all taken from Bishop Bonner's records, probably from a court book which is now lost.

MarginaliaAnsweres to the Articles aforesayd. TO the first article, they beleue that the contentes of this article, is not agreable to scripture.

To the second, they answere and beleue, that their parentes and other expressed in the sayd article, so beleuyng, as is contayned in the same, were deceiued.

To the thyrd, they aunswere, that they so beleued: but they were deceiued therein, as they now beleue.

To
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield