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K. Hen. 7. The history of the Turkes The besieging of Vienna by the Turkes.

vpon the wal, and his office appoynted what to do: but especially that side of the City which lyeth to the riuer of Danubius, they fortified after the best wise: for that way only now remained for vitail to be transported from the Bohemians vnto them. MarginaliaProuision made for victualing the citie.Wherefore 8. ensignes were assigned to the keping of the bridge, and in the plaine, which was lyke an Iland inclosed wythin the riuer, a sufficient garrison of horsmen were placed, lying within the gunshot of the city, to the entent that if any graine or vitail were sent from the Bohemians, they myght prouide þe same safely to be brought into the Citie.

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These things thus being disposed and set in order, L. William Rogendorffe, to assay the strength of the Turks, made diuers rodes out wyth his horsemen, albeit much against þe mindes of the Austrians: MarginaliaGood coūsaile & experience refused. who knowing the maner of the Turkes, thought it better to suffer them, while either wyth time they myght be ouerweried, or for lacke of victuals consumed. Among many and sondry skirmishes which the Christians had with the Turkes, one especially was to our men vnprosperous: in whych certaine of the horsemen espying a small troupe of the Turkes scattering abroad from theyr company, made out after them, who sodenly & guilefully were inclosed and circumuented by the Turks, before they could recouer the gates of the citie, and so were all taken aliue: MarginaliaRashe hardines of our Christians in skirmishing with the turke. Of whome 3. were sent from the Turkes into the Citye, to declare to the Viennians what strength they had seene in the campe of their aduersaries, and to sollicite them to yelde their city for feare of punishment which would followe: MarginaliaThe wretched cruelty of the turkes against the Christian captiues.The residue they reserued to torments and punishment, whom in the sight of the whole army, and of the Christians (whych should tell the same to the Citizens) they caused euery man to be drawne with 4. horses a piece, and so to be dismēbred and pluckt a sonder.

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After thys done, the barbarous Turk immediatly sent his Herold to talke wyth the Captaines of the City, whether they would yelde the City vpon honest conditions, or els would abide the arbitrement of warre. MarginaliaThe message of the urke to the Viennians.If they would gently submit them selues, they should haue all gentlenes to them shewed: If they would be stubburne, and stand to their defence, he wold also stand to hys siege begon, so that he neither woulde spare man, woman nor childe. To thys the captaines aunswered againe, MarginaliaThe aunswere of the Viēnians to the turke.that they were contented Solyman to stand to his seige begon, and to do his vttermost, what he would, or what he coulde. As for them, they were at a poynte to defende them selues and their Citie so long as they might: the euent & fall of victory to be doubtfull, and many times so to happen, that they whych begin the warre, are wearied sooner then they which be prouoked: neither againe that they were so vnmindfull eyther of themselues, or of their country, but that they did remember well what they are, and what they be called, named to be Germaines: who vse alwayes first to assay the aduersary, what he is able to doe, and not rashly to committe themselues into their enemies handes.

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MarginaliaSolymanus approcheth Vienna with three great armiesSolymannus not a little disdaining at thys aunswer, first burning and consuming all the villages, houses, and places round about the city, infecting also the springs and fountaines whych gaue water into the Citye, and so stopping al passages, that no reliefe should haue way vnto thē, began wt angry moode to approche more neare to the Citie, with 3. great campes, sending them worde in skorne and contumely, by one of his captiues, that if they stood in nede of helpe of soldiors, he would send vnto them the 300. Bohemians (mentioned a little before) to aid them in theyr defence. To whom the Palatine directed answer again, that they had moe soldiours in the City then they neded. As for the Bohemians which had yelded themselues, he might do wyth them, what he would, for Vienna stoode in no great neede of them.

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MarginaliaA messenger sent from Ferdinādus to Vienna.In the meane time a messenger comming from Ferdinandus, was priuily let in by night into the Citie, which brought word that they should play the men in keping out the enemy a while: for it would not be long but both Ferdinandus and Carolus his brother, with the strēgth of all Germanie, would be ready to rescue them. At whych message the hearts of the soldiours began somwhat to be cheared, and to contemne the huge multitude of the aduersaries, being so great as they neuer did beholde, nor did euer almoste heare of before. The largenesse of whose army, extended to no lesse in compasse (as is aboue sayde) then of 7. miles round about the Citie walles.

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MarginaliaThe siege of Vienna beginneth.Long it were  

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The following passages attributing the failure of Süleyman to takeVienna to divine intervention and the quotation from Psalm 127 are Foxe's interpo-lation into the text.

to recite the whole order of thys terrible siege, with all the partes and circumstances therof. Briefly to touch so much as shal suffice for this history, with fewer words then were stripes geuen at the siege thereof: thys is to be iudged and confessed: whosoeuer beholdeth the nōber and fiercenesse of the Turkes, the absence of the king Fer-dinandus, the lacke of prouision and vitaile within the city, the noise of the gunnes, the violence of the shot, the terror of the sight, and yet no succour sent vnto them: that the custody of that city was no mans doing, but the arme only of the Lorde God of hostes, according to the true saying of the Psalme: 
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Psalm 127:1.

MarginaliaThe Lordes power and prouidence in keeping the Citie of Vienna.Vnlesse the Lorde doe keepe the Citie, the watchmen watch in vaine, which watch to saue it: Vnles the Lord doe build the house, the builder striueth in vayne, whych taketh vpon hym to builde it. Experience whereof in keping thys citie may well appeare.

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First Solymannus bending 

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Foxe resumes with a translation of Ramusio's account of the siegeof Vienna. From here through the siege of Vienna, Foxe is taking his detailednarrative of events from Giovann Battisto Ramusio's history as excerpted inLaonicus Chalkokondylas, De origine et rebus gestis Turcorum (Basel, 1556), pp.199-209. Foxe abridged a great deal of the detail in the account, particularly thedescription of the Ottoman army and the topography of Vienna.

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hys shotte and ordinance against the City, beate downe to the ground the vamures with all the vttermost suburbs of the city, and that in suche a short moment of time, that the hearts of the Viennians a little before refreshed, were now as much appaled agayne with feare, misdoubting wyth themselues, least the Turke with the same celerity and violence woulde haue preuailed against the inwarde walles, as he did in beating down the outward vamures. And no doubt the same time the Turk had put the city in great hazard, had not night commynge on, broken of the siege for that day.

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In the meane time the Citizens laboured all night in repairing and refreshing the wals, to make all things sure against the next assault. MarginaliaThe slaughter of the turkes about the walles of Vienna.The next day early in þe morning, the Turks approching the city againe with a new assault, thinking to scale the walles, were so repulsed & manfully resisted by the Germaines, that vnneth any ditches aboute the walles could be sene for the bodies of the dead Turkes, wherwith they were replenished: so that the Turks were faine to fight standing vpon the bodies of them which wer slaine. By the which calamitie the force of the enemye was not a little abated,

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MarginaliaThe manlynes of Captaine Rogendorffius against the turkesIt happened the same time, that a companye of the Turkes being spied oute of the Citie wandering oute of order, the Captaine Rogendorffius wyth two legions of horsemenne issuing out of the Citie gate called Salmaria, and so passing closely vnder the hilles side, did so set vpon them, that they slew a great number of them: the rest being driuen to take the riuer, whome with stones and shot likewise they destroyed, and so retired backe into the Citie againe. By thys victorie the Captaine Rogendorffius began to be terrible to the Turkes. For in the same skirmish (as after was knowen) was slayne of them so many, that of 5000. and 300. horsemen and footemen, scarse 140. escaped aliue.

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MarginaliaAn other assault of the turkes against Vienna.Solyman disdayning at this repulse, thought to proue an other way, & so bringing his power toward þe gate called þe kings gate, there making his trenches & bulwarkes, plāted his ordināce, wt the violence wherof þe walles were so battered & shaken, that no man was able there to stand. Wherefore the Turke seeing 2. great breaches made in the wal cōmaunded his souldiors couertly in the darck smoke of gunnepouder to prease into the City. The like also was done at þe scottish tower, whereby þe city was inuaded in 2. sundry places at one time. The Viēnians at þe first, freshly began to withstand thē, new souldiors still cōming in the place of them that were slaine and hurt: and so this assault continuing more thē 6. houres together, our mē beganne at length to languish & faint, not onely in strength but also in courage: wherby the Citie had bene in great daunger of loosing, had not þe two foresaid Capitaines Rogendorffius in the one place, and the Earle of Salme in the other place, manfully encouraged the souldiors to abide þe brunt, and to beare out a while the violence of the Turkes, promising that immediately they should haue ayde from Ferdinandus.

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In the meane time the Turkes came so thicke for gredines of the victory, scaling, climing, and fighting vpō the walles, that had it not bene for the prease and throng of the great multitude of the Turkes comming so thicke that one of them could not fight for an other, Vienna that same day had bene taken and vtterly lost: MarginaliaAnother repulse of the turkes.But by the pollicy of þe captaines geuing a signe within the city, as though new souldiors were called for, our men began to be encouraged, & the Turkes hartes to be discomfited.

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When Solymannus saw his army the second time, repulsed, he began to attempt a new way, purposing by vndermining to ouerthrow the city: in the which work specially he vsed the helpe of the Illyrians, of whome he had a great number in his campe, expert in that kinde of feate. These Illyrians beginning to breake the earth at the gate Carinthia MarginaliaVienna vndermined by the turkes.and comming neare to the foundations of the Tower, which they by strength of hand attēpted to break, could not worke so closely vnder the groūd, but they were perceiued by certayne men aboue, which were skilfull & expert in þt kind of matter: who cōtrariwise vndermining against thē, & filling their trēches as they wēt, wt gūpouder,

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so con-
TT.iij.
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