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Aldermanbury [Aldermanberie]

London

 
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Bermondsey [Barmondsey; Barmsey]

Middlesex, Southwark, London

Site of the Cluniac abbey of St Saviour's, which possessed an ancient cross found near the Thames in 1117; pilgrimage site [VCH: Surrey, vol 2 (1967) pp. 64-77]

 
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Chipping Sodbury [Chepingsadbery]

Gloucestershire

OS grid ref: ST 725 825

 
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Cromer [Crome]

Norfolk (TG 215 425) or Cromer, Hertfordshire (TL 295 285)

 
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Little Marlow

Buckinghamshire

OS grid ref: SU 875 885

 
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Norwich
NGR: TG 230 070

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Humbleyard, county of Norfolk, of which it is the capital. 108 miles north-east by north from London. The city comprises 33 parishes, and the liberty of the city a further four. Of these 37, three are rectories, 12 are discharged rectories, three are vicarages, one is a discharged vicarage, and 18 are perpetual curacies. St Andrew, St Helen, St James, St Paul and Lakenham are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter; the rest are in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich, of which the city is the seat.

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Further information:

Andrews church (now St Andrews Hall) is at the junction of St Andrews Street and Elm Hill.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Salisbury
NGR: SU 145 300

A city having separate civil jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Underditch, county of Wilts. 82 miles south-west by west from London. The city comprises the parishes of St Edmund, St Martin and St Thomas, in the jurisdiction of the Sub-Dean, and in the diocese of Salisbury, of which the city is the seat. The cathedral precinct is extra-parochial, and under the jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter. The living of St Edmund is a rectory not in charge; St Martin is a discharged rectory; and St Thomas a perpetual curacy.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Staines [Stanes]

Surrey

OS grid ref: TQ 045 715

 
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Walsingham

Norfolk

OS grid ref: TF 935 367

Major pilgrimage site

 
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Willesden

[Wilsdone; Wilsedon]

Middlesex, London

OS grid ref: TQ 225 845

799 [775]

K. Henry. 7. Tho. Chase murthered. Tho. Norice. Laurence Ghest. A woman burned.

they imagined how and which way they might put hym to death, least there should be a tumulte or an vprore amōg the people. And as Richard Hun shortly after was hanged or strangled in Lolardes tower, about the yeare of our Lord 1514. euen so these bloudsuppers most cruelly strangled and prest to death this said Thomas Chase in prison, MarginaliaTho. Chase cruelly murthered in the Bishops prison. which most hartely called vpon God to receiue his spirit: as witnesseth a certaine woman, that kept him in prison.

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After that these stinging vipers being of the wicked broode of Antichrist, had thus most cruelly and impiouslye murthered this faithfull Christian, they were at their wits ende, and could not tell what shift to make, to cloke theyr shamefull murther withall, at last to blinde the ignoraunt sely people, these bloudy butchers most slaunderously caused by their ministers to be bruted abroade, that the foresaid Thomas Chase had hanged himselfe in prison: MarginaliaTho. Chase falsely slaūdered to hang himselfe.which was a most shamefull and abhominable lie, for the prison was such, that a man coulde not stand vpright, not lye at ease but stooping, as they do report that did knowe it. And besides that, this man had so many manacles & yrons vpon him, that he could not wel moue neither hand nor foote, as the women did declare that sawe him dead, in so much that they cōfessed that his bloudbolke was broken by reason they had so vily beaten him and brused him: And yet these holy catholikes had not made an end of their wicked acte in this both killing and slandering of this godly martyr, but to put out the remembrance of him, they caused him to be buried in the wood called Norlandwood, in the hie way betwixt Wooburne and little Marlow, to the entent he should not be takē vp againe to be seene: And thus commonly are innocent men layd vp by these clerkly clergye men. But he that is effectually true of himselfe, hath promised at one time or at another, to cleare his true seruauntes, not with lyes and fables, but by his owne true word. No secret 

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Matthew 10:26; Luke 12:2.

saith he, is so close, MarginaliaGod bringeth to light the secret murthers of the papistes. Math. 10. Luke. 12.but once shall be opened, neither is any thing so hid, that shall not at the last be knowne clearely. Such a sweete Lord is God alwaies to those that are his true seruants. Blessed be his holy name therefore, for euer and euer, Amen.

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Thomas Harding being one of this company, thus molested and troubled as is aforesaide, in the towne of Amersham, for the truth of the Gospell, after hys abiuration and penaunce done, was againe sought for, and brought to the fire, in the dayes of King Henry viij. and vnder D. Langlond then Bishop of Lincolne, succeeding after Cardinall Wolsey. Of whose death and martirdome, we shall likewise record (Christ willing and graunting) in order when we shall come to the time and yeare of his suffering.

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MarginaliaTho. Norice Martir. Anno. 1507.After the martirdome of these two, I read 

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Foxe's source for this is John Bale, Scriptorum Illustrium maiorisBrytanniae…Catalogus (Basel, 1557), p. 644. Bale has an additional detail not inFoxe: Noris was from Brockforth, Suffolk.

also of one Thomas Norice, who likewise for the same cause, that is, for the profession of Christes Gospell, was condemned by the Bishop and burnt at Norwich, the last day of March, an. 1507.

MarginaliaElizabeth Sampson. Anno. 1508.In the next yeare folowing, which was an. 1508. In the consistory of London, was conuented Elizabeth Sampson, of the parish of Aldermanberie vpon certain Articles 

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Foxe's source for these articles was the register of Bishop Fitzjamesof London (Guildhall MS 9531//9, fo. 4r-v). The register reveals that Elizabeth was was the wife of John Sampson, a carpenter of St. Mary Aldermanbury. Sampson's abjuration took place on 31 March 1510, not 1508 as Foxe declares. Foxe omits twoof the articles against her (the rest he prints accurately). One of the articles Foxedeleted charged that she had declared that 'moo soules than is in hevyn all ready shall come to hevyn'; the other charged that she denied the bodily resurrection of Christ.

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, and specially for speaking against pilgrimage & adoration of Images, as þe Image of our Lady at Wilsdone, at Stanings, at Crome, at Walsingham, and the Image of saint Sauiour, of Barmondsey, and against the Sacrament of the aultar, and for that she had spoken these or like words: that our Lady of Wilsdon was but a burnt arse efie, and a burnt arse stocke, and if she might haue holpen men & women which go to her on pilgrimage, she woulde not haue suffred her taile to haue bene burnt: and what should folke worship our Lady of Wilsdone, or our Lady of Crome, for the one is but a burnt arse stocke, and the other is but a puppit: and better it were for the people to geue theyr almes at home to poore people, then to go on pilgrimage. Also that she called the Image of Saint Sauiour, Sim Sauiour with kit lips, and that she said she could make as good bread as that which the priest occupied, and that it was not the body of Christ, but bread, for that Christ could not be both in heauen and earth at one time. For these and certaine other articles, she was compelled to abiure, before Maister William Horsey, Chancellour the day and yeare aboue written. Ex Regist. Lond.

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¶ Laurence Ghest.

MarginaliaLaurence Ghest. Martir.LAmentable it is to remember, & a thing almost infinite to comprehend the names, times, and persons of al thē which haue bene slaine by the rigour of the Popes Cleargie, for the true mainteining of Christes cause and of hys Sacraments. Whose memory being registred in the booke of life, albeit it neede not the cōmemoration of our stories, yet for the more confirmation of the Church, I thought itnot vnprofitable, the suffering and Martyrdome of them to be notified, which innocently haue geuen their bloud to be shed in Christes quarell.

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In the Cathalogue of whom next in order cōmeth the memoriall of Laurence Ghest, who was burned in Salisbury 

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Foxe's account, obtained from two second-hand sources, provides theonly surviving information on the burning of Laurence Ghest. But there was anotherburning in Salisbury, of one William Prior, at about the same time (J. A. F. Thomson, The Later Lollards, 1414-1520 [Oxford, 1965], p. 83).

for matter of the Sacrament, in the dayes of K. Henry the 7. he was of a comely & tall personage, & otherwise (as appeareth) not vnfrended, for the which the Byshop & the close were the more lothe to burne him: but kept him in prison the space of ij. yeares. MarginaliaLaurēce Ghest two yeares in prison at Salisbury. This Laurence had a wife and vij. children. Wherfore they thinkyng to expugne and perswade his mynde by þe stirring his fatherly affectiō toward his childrē, when the time came which they appointed for his burning, as he was at þe stake, they brought before him his wife and his foresayd vij. children. MarginaliaLaurence would not be turned for wyfe nor childrēAt the sight wherof, although nature is cōmonly wont to worke in other, yet in him religiō ouercōming nature, made his constancie to remaine vnmoueable: in such sorte as when his wife began to exhort & desire him to fauour himselfe, he agayne desired her to be cōtēt, & not to be a block to his way, for he was in a good course, runnyng toward the marke of his saluatiō: & so fire beyng put to him, MarginaliaLaurence died a Martir.he finished his life, renouncing not onely wife & children, but also him selfe to follow Christ. As he was in burning, one of the Byshops men threw a firebrand at his face: Whereat the brother of Laurence standing by, ranne at him with his dagger, and would haue slayne him, had he not bene otherwise stayd.

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MarginaliaWitnes to the story.Testified & witnessed by the credible report of one Williā Russell an aged mā dwelling of late in Colmanstreete, who was there present 

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William Russell, a tailor of Coleman Street, London, hosted Lollardconventicles in his house during the 1520s (Susan Brigden, London and the Reformation [Oxford, 1989], p. 103).

the same tyme at the burnyng of Laurence, & was also himselfe burned in the cheke, & one of the persecuted flocke in those dayes, whose daughter is yet liuing: The same is confirmed also with the testimony of one Richard Web seruaunt sometyme to M. Latymer, who 
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Webb is also the source for a demonstrably fictitious story. The Richard Webb who is the source for this story was Foxe's source for the burning of Laurence Ghest.

soiournyng in the house of the sayd William Russell, heard him many tymes declare the same.

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¶ A faythfull woman burned.

MarginaliaA notable storie of a faithfull woman burned in Chippingsadbery.BVt amongest all the examples of them wherof so many haue suffered from tyme to tyme for Christ & his truth, I can not tell if euer were any Martyrdome more notable & admirable, wherein the playne demonstration of Gods might power and iudgement hath at any time bene more euident agaynst the persecutours of his flocke, then at the burnyng of a certaine godly woman, put to death in Chepingsadbery, about the same tyme, vnder the raigne of K. Henry the seuenth.

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The cōstācie of which blessed womā, as it is glorious for all true godly Christians to behold: so agayne the exāple of the Byshops Chaūcellour, which cruelly cōdemned the innocent, may offer a terrible spectacle to the eyes of all Papisticall persecutours to consider, and to take example: which the liuing God graunt they may. Amen. The name of the Towne where she was martyred, was as is sayd, Chepyngsadbery. The name of the woman is not as yet come to my knowledge. The name of the Chauncellour, who condēned her, was called D. Whittington. MarginaliaD. Whittington Chauncellour a persecutour. The time of her burnyng was in the raigne & tyme of K. Henry 7. orderly therfore in this place & time to be inserted. 

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Although there is no surviving record of this woman's execution and,although the coda to this tale is untrue, it is true that Dr. ThomasWoodington was chancellor and vicar general of the diocese of Worcester in 1500-1501. (See Emden A; also see J. F. Mozley, John Foxe and his Book [London, 1940], p. 164). It is therefore probable that this burning took place.

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Wherein is to be noted moreouer the oportunitie of this present history brought to my hands, & that in such cōuenient season, as I was drawyng toward the ende of the foresayd kynges raigne: so that it may appeare to them which behold the oportunitie of things, not to be without Gods holy wil & prouidence, that this foresayd example should not lye hid & vnremembred, but should come to light & knowledge, and that in such order of placing, accordyng as the due course of our story hetherto kept, requireth.

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After this godly woman and manly Martyr of Christ was condemned by the wretched Chaūcellour aboue named D. Whittington, for the faithfull profession of þe truth, which the Papistes then called heresie, and the tyme now come whē she should be brought to the place and paynes of her martyrdome, a great concourse of all the multitude both in the towne and countrey about (as the maner is in such tymes) was gathered to behold her end. Among whō was also the foresayd Doct. Whittington the Chauncellour, there present to see the execution done. MarginaliaA faithfull Christian wemā and Martir, burned at Chippingsadbery.Thus this faythfull woman, and true seruaunt of God cōstantly persisting in the testimony of the truth, committing her cause to the Lord, gaue ouer her life to þe fire, refusing no paynes nor tormentes to keepe her conscience cleare & vnreproueable in the day of the Lord. The sacrifice beyng ended, the people began to returne homeward, commyng from the burning of this blessed Martyr. It happened in the meane tyme that as the Catholicke executioners were busie in

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slaying
XX.iiij.
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