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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Agnes Howard (née Tilney)

(by 1477 - 1545) [ODNB]

Married the earl of Surrey in 1497; duchess of Norfolk 1514; widowed 1524; godmother to Princess Elizabeth

Agnes Howard carried the infant Elizabeth at her christening. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

 
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Charles Brandon

(c. 1484 - 1545) [ODNB]

1st duke of Suffolk (1514 - 45); courtier and soldier; married Margaret, Henry VIII's sister, widow of Louis XII

When reaction in Suffolk to Cardinal Wolsey's exactions threatened to turn violent, the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk calmed the people. 1570, p. 1121; 1576, p. 960; 1583, p. 987.

The duke of Suffolk tested the basin of water for Cardinal Wolsey when Henry VIII attended mass after receiving the papal bull granting him the title of defender of the faith. 1563, p. 441; 1570, p. 1124; 1576, p. 962; 1583, p. 989.

Thomas Wolsey was indicted for praemunire, his goods were confiscated, and the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk were sent to remove from him the great seal. They were then assigned to hear causes in the Star Chamber. 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 994.

The duke of Suffolk was sent to Catherine of Aragon after her divorce from the king to reduce the size of her household, removing those who refused to serve her as princess rather than queen. 1570, p. 1200; 1576, p. 1027; 1583, p. 1055.

The duke of Suffolk walked on the left side of the dowager duchess of Norfolk, godmother to Princess Elizabeth, at the christening of the princess. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

The king sent the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk, the marquess of Exeter and the earl of Shrewsbury into Yorkshire to put down the Pilgrimage of Grace. 1570, pp. 1237-38; 1576, pp. 1059-60; 1583, pp. 1086-87.

The king sent Thomas Cromwell and the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Thomas Cranmer to reassure him after his opposition to the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1111; 1583, p. 1136.

Geoffrey Loveday was charged with supplying money to Adam Damplip in Calais. He was able to prove that he had been in Paris at the time, seeing to the affairs of the duke of Suffolk. 1563, p. 663; 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1111; 1583, p. 1136.

The duke of Suffolk was one of those appointed commissioner for Calais in 1540. 1563, p. 664; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1226.

The duke of Suffolk's chaplain, Alexander Seton, was presented in London in 1541 for a sermon he had preached. 1570, p. 1379; 1576, p. 1177; 1583, p. 1205.

After the death of Henry VIII, the duke of Suffolk related to Thomas Cranmer how Stephen Gardiner had nearly been arrested at the time of the execution of Germaine Gardiner. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1290.

 
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Edward Stanley

(1509 - 1572) [ODNB]

3rd earl of Derby (1521 - 72)

Thomas Wolsey, having obtained large sums from the king's treasury, went to the French court to contribute to the ransom of Clement VII, hiring soldiers and furnishing the French army. He took with him Cuthbert Tunstall, William Sandys, the earl of Derby, Sir Henry Guildford and Sir Thomas More. 1563, p. 439; 1570, p. 1123; 1576, p. 962; 1583, p. 988.

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The earl of Derby helped to support Princess Elizabeth's train at her christening. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

 
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Elizabeth Barton

(c. 1506 - 1534) [ODNB]

called the Holy Maid of Kent, the Nun of Kent. Benedictine nun and visionary

Elizabeth Barton prophesied that if the king divorced Queen Catherine and married Anne Boleyn, he would not reign more than a month thereafter. Through the efforts of Cranmer, Cromwell and Latimer, she was condemned and executed with some of her supporters. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, pp. 1054-55.

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François Lambert

(1486 - 1530)

b. Avignon; Franciscan convert to protestantism; met Luther in Wittenberg; returned to Strasbourg in 1524 to preach reform; head of the theological faculty at the University of Marburg 1527

Franç Lambert taught Patrick Hamilton at the University of Marburg. 1563, p. 460; 1570, p. 1107; 1576, p. 947; 1583, p. 974.

Books by Luther, Melancthon and Lambert were given to Rainolde West by William Paget at Cambridge. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

 
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George Boleyn

(c. 1504 - 1536) [ODNB]

Viscount Rochford (1529 - 36); courtier and diplomat; brother of Anne; beheaded

When Anne Boleyn was sent Simon Fish's book, Supplication for the Beggars, her brother urged her to show it to the king. 1570, p. 448; 1570, p. 1152; 1576, p. 986; 1583, p. 1014.

Anne Boleyn, her father and her brother maintained many learned men at Cambridge. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Lord Rochford helped to carry the canopy over Princess Elizabeth at her christening. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Queen Anne was imprisoned in the Tower with her brother and others. She was beheaded, delivering a short address before. 1563, p. 526; 1570, p. 1233; 1576, p. 1055; 1583, p. 1082.

 
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Gertrude Courtenay (née Blount)

(d. 1558) [ODNB]

Marchioness of Exeter; married Henry Courtnay in 1519; widowed 1538

The widowed marchioness of Exeter was godmother to Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

 
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Henry Bourchier

(1472 - 1540) [ODNB]

2nd earl of Essex (1483 - 1540); constable of Windsor Castle 1511; captain of the king's spears

The earl of Essex brought the basin of water for Cardinal Wolsey when Henry VIII attended mass after receiving the papal bull granting him the title of defender of the faith. 1563, p. 441; 1570, p. 1124; 1576, p. 962; 1583, p. 989.

Henry Bourchier was present at the condemnation of Richard Bayfield. 1563, p. 488; 1570, p. 1164; 1576, p. 995; 1583, p. 1023.

The earl of Essex carried covered gilt basins at Princess Elizabeth's christening. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

 
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Henry Courtenay

(1498/9 - 1538) [ODNB]

Marquess of Exeter (1525 - 38); courtier

The marquess of Exeter carried the wax candle at the christening of Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

The king sent the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk, the marquess of Exeter and the earl of Shrewsbury into Yorkshire to put down the Pilgrimage of Grace. 1570, pp. 1237-38; 1576, pp. 1059-60; 1583, pp. 1086-87.

 
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Henry Grey

(1517 - 1554) [ODNB]

Marquess of Dorset 1530; duke of Suffolk 1551; magnate, father of Lady Jane

The marquess of Dorset carried the salt at the christening of Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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Grey was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

 
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Joan Wilkinson (née North)

(d. 1556) [ODNB]

Religious radical; sister of Edward North, 1st Baron North; Anne Boleyn's silkwoman (1533 - 35); cared for imprisoned protestants during Mary's reign, then went into exile; died at Frankfurt

Joan Wilkinson praised the order kept in Queen Anne's court, with the ladies of the court kept occupied with sewing for the poor. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

 
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John Hussey

(1465/6 - 1537) [ODNB]

Baron Hussey of Sleaford 1529; diplomat; administrator; sheriff of Lincolnshire 1493, 1494; JP Lincolnshire 1495, 1497, 1501; chamberlain to Princess Mary by 1530; alleged rebel; executed after the Pilgrimage of Grace

Lord Hussey helped to carry the canopy over Princess Elizabeth at her christening. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

John Hussey received a letter from Sir William Paulet which he showed to Princess Mary. 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1395.

Hussey and other rebels were executed in 1537. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1087.

 
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Margaret Grey (née Fynche, formerly Curteys)

(d. 1540-41) [ODNB sub Richard Grey]

Widow of London alderman Dawes; married Richard Grey, earl of Kent; countess of Kent (1521 - 40/41)

The duchess of Kent carried Princess Elizabeth's train at her christening. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

 
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Margaret Grey (née Wotton; Medley)

(d. in or after 1535) [ODNB sub Thomas Grey]

Marchioness of Dorset; married Thomas Grey in 1509; widowed 1530

The widowed marchioness of Dorset was godmother to Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

 
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Mary Fitzroy (née Howard)

(c. 1519 - 1555?) [ODNB]

Duchess of Richmond 1533; daughter of Thomas Howard, 3rd duke of Norfolk; wife of Henry Fitzroy, duke of Richmond (d. 1536; the marriage was unconsummated); patron of Foxe and Bale

Mary Howard carried the christening robe at the christening of Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Mary Fitzroy had been a principal maid of Queen Anne and reported that she used to carry money about daily to give to the poor. 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

 
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Nicholas Heath

(1501? - 1578) [ODNB]

Archdeacon of Stafford 1534; bishop of Worcester (1543 - 51, 1553 - 55); archbishop of York (1555 - 60); lord chancellor (1556 - 59)

Nicholas Heath was one of the learned men at Cambridge supported by the Boleyns. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Heath was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1212; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Heath was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 854.

 
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Rainolde West

Lollard

William Paget supplyed Rainolde West with books by Luther and other German protestants when he was at Cambridge. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

James Bainham asked Rainolde West to accompany him to his burning. 1563, p. 497.

 
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Robert Barnes

(c. 1495 - 1540) [ODNB]

Religious reformer; martyr of King's Lynn, Norfolk.

Augustinian friar; scholar of Cambridge and Louvain; prior of Augustinians, Cambridge; B.D. Cambridge 1522-23 ; BTh 1523

Arrested in 1526, abjured. Escaped to Wittenberg and became a good friend of Martin Luther; returned in 1531-32 and 1534; became royal chaplain in 1535

Robert Barnes went from Louvain to Cambridge. He became prior and master of the house of the Augustinians. 1563, p. 589; 1570, p. 1363; 1576, p. 1163; 1583, p. 1192.

Barnes was converted at Cambridge by Thomas Bilney, Thomas Arthur and others. 1563, p. 482.

Barnes preached his first sermon after his conversion at St Edward's church, Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and was immediately accused of heresy by two fellows of King's Hall. His supporters met frequently at the White Horse tavern. 1563, p. 601; 1570, p. 1364; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1192.

Barnes was supported at Cambridge by William Paget and Gardiner. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Robert Barnes often visited Bury Abbey to see his friend Edmund Rougham, who had been his fellow student at Louvain. While there, Barnes, Lawrence Maxwell and John Stacy converted Richard Bayfield. Bayfield was imprisoned in the abbey, whipped and stocked. Barnes and Edmund Rougham eventually secured his release, and he went with Barnes to Cambridge. 1563, p. 484; 1570, p. 1161; 1576, p. 993; 1583, p. 1021.

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Barnes preached repentance and had his books burned. 1570, p. 39; 1576, p. 32; 1583, p. 32.

Barnes was arrested and taken to London, where he was examined by Cardinal Wolsey. At the urging of Stephen Gardiner and Edward Fox, he abjured. 1563, pp. 601-02; 1570, pp. 1364-65; 1576, pp. 1164-65; 1583, pp. 1192-93.

Thomas Wolsey charged Barnes with heresy and made him bear a faggot. 1570, p. 1129; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 993.

Barnes performed his penance with four Stilliard men. He was then imprisoned in the Fleet for half a year. Afterwards he was committed to the Augustinian house in London as a free prisoner. Further complaints to the cardinal resulted in an order that Barnes be sent to Northampton to be burnt. 1563, p. 602; 1570, p. 1365; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1193.

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In Northampton Barnes left a suicide note and a pile of clothes on the river-bank and fled to London, from whence he escaped to Antwerp. 1563, p. 602; 1570, p. 1365; 1576, p. 1164; 1583, p. 1193.

From Antwerp Barnes went to Germany and found favour with Luther, Melancthon, Bugenhagen, Justus Jonas, Hegendorph, Aepinus, the duke of Saxony and the king of Denmark. 1563, p. 603; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1165; 1583, p. 1194.

The king of Denmark sent Barnes as ambassador to Henry VIII with a delegation from Luebeck. Barnes flourished during the time that Anne Boleyn was queen. 1563, p. 603; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1165; 1583, p. 1194.

John Lambert attended a sermon preached by John Taylor at St Peter's in London in 1538. Lambert put ten articles to him questioning transubstantiation. Taylor conferred with Robert Barnes, who persuaded Taylor to put the matter to Archbishop Cranmer. Cranmer called Lambert into open court, where he was made to defend his cause. 1563, pp. 532-33; 1570, pp. 1280-81; 1576, p. 1095; 1583, p. 1121.

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Barnes and William Barlow informed Thomas Cromwell of the arrest of Thomas Frebarne for obtaining pork in Lent for his pregnant wife and asked him to send for the mayor. 1570, p. 1354; 1576, p. 1156; 1583, p. 1185.

Robert Barnes was sent on an embassy to the duke of Cleves by Henry VIII to help negotiate his marriage with Anne of Cleves. 1563, p. 603; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1165; 1583, p. 1194.

After the fall of Cromwell and Stephen Gardiner's return from France, Barnes and other preachers were arrested. He was examined, and he, Garrard and Jerome were appointed to preach sermons. Gardiner was present at Barnes' sermon, and Barnes was sent for and imprisoned in the Tower. 1563, p. 603; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1165; 1583, p. 1194.

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Stephen Gardiner complained to the king about the sermon of Robert Barnes preached during Lent at Paul's Cross. He disputed with Barnes, and Richard Coxe and Thomas Robinson acted as arbiters. 1570, p. 1371; 1576, p. 1169; 1583, p. 1198.

King Henry commanded that Robert Barnes, Thomas Garrard and William Jerome recant the doctrine they had been preaching. 1570, p. 1371; 1576, p. 1170; 1583, p. 1198.

Barnes first recanted in his sermon and then continued the sermon contrary to his recantation. 1570, p. 1371; 1576, p. 1170; 1583, p. 1198.

Barnes, Garrard and Jerome were committed to the Tower. They were brought together to Smithfield and burnt. 1563, pp. 611-12; 1570, pp. 1371-72; 1576, p. 1170-71; 1583, p. 1199-1200.

Barnes was one of the authors whose books were banned by the proclamation of 1546. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1246.

 
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Thomas Boleyn

(1476/7 - 1539) [ODNB]

Earl of Wiltshire and earl of Ormond (1529 - 39); father of Anne

Thomas Boleyn, John Stokesley and Edward Lee were sent as delegates to the pope to present the king's case for a divorce from Queen Catherine. 1570, p. 1195; 1576, p. 1023; 1583, p. 1051.

Thomas Cranmer, John Stokesley, Edward Carne, William Benet and the earl of Wiltshire were sent as ambassadors to the pope to dispute the matter of the king's marriage. 1570, p. 1280; 1576, p. 1095; 1583, p. 1121.

Anne Boleyn, her father and her brother maintained many learned men at Cambridge. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

The earl of Wiltshire helped to support Princess Elizabeth's train at her christening. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Thomas Boleyn is mentioned in a letter by Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 736; 1583, p. 1345.

Gardiner recalled Thomas Boleyn being called in as a witness by the Lord Protector when delivering articles against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 757; 1570, p. 1527; 1576, p. 1302; 1583, p. 1352.

 
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Thomas Howard

(c. 1512 - 1537) [ODNB]

Courtier; 2nd son of Thomas Howard, the 2nd duke of Norfolk

Lord Thomas Howard helped to carry the canopy over Princess Elizabeth at her christening. 1563, p. 510; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

 
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Thomas Thirlby

(1506? - 1570) [ODNB]

BCL Cambridge by 1521; DCL 1528; DCnL 1530; auditor for Cambridge University 1530/31

Archdeacon of Ely by 1534; bishop of Westminster (1540 - 50); bishop of Norwich (1550 - 54); bishop of Ely (1554 - 50)

When Thomas Thirlby was a scholar at Cambridge, he often played the recorder in his room. At such times Thomas Bilney, living in the room above, would begin to pray. 1563, p. 482.

Thomas Thirlby was one of the learned men at Cambridge supported by the Boleyns. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Thirlby was resident ambassador to France with Stephen Gardiner in 1538. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

In a letter to Thomas Cromwell, Edmund Bonner asks for financial help, mentioning that he owes money to Thomas Thirlby and Simon Haynes. 1570, p. 1240; 1576, p. 1062; 1583, p. 1088.

Edward VI's councillors and Edward Seymour wrote to Thomas Cranmer, directing that candles no longer be carried on Candlemas, nor palms on Palm Sunday, nor should ashes be used on Ash Wednesday. Cranmer immediately wrote to the other bishops, including Bonner, to inform them of the new directive. Bonner consented to the changes and wrote to Thomas Thirlby to inform him of them. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

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The council wrote further to Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. He wrote to Edmund Bonner, directing him to carry out the order in London, and Bonner in turn wrote to Thomas Thirlby. 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Thomas Thirlby was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 829-30, 855.

 
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William Howard

(c. 1510 - 1573) [ODNB]

1st Baron Howard of Effingham (1554 - 73) naval commander

Naval commander; lord chamberlain (1558 - 72); privy councillor (1558 - 73); lord privy seal (1572 - 73)

William Howard helped to carry the canopy over Princess Elizabeth at her christening. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

William Howard was a witness in 1551 to the sentence against Stephen Gardiner and his appellation. 1563, p. 867.

 
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William Paget

(1505/6 - 1563) [ODNB]

Diplomat and administrator; JP Middlesex (1537 - death), MP Buckinghamshire (1547 - death), MP Derbyshire 1547, MP Staffordshire (1547 - death); MP Middlesex 1545, MP Staffordshire 1547; privy councillor (1543 - death); clerk to the privy council 1540; clerk of the parliament (1541 - 49)

1st Lord Paget of Beaudesert (1549 - 63); lord privy seal (1556 - 58)

William Paget was one of the learned men at Cambridge supported by the Boleyns. He supported Barnes and other protestants at that time, supplying books and helping monks leave their orders. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Paget was present at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

William Paget was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

William Paget was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Paget was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

The king sent a letter to the lord mayor of London, Henry Amcottes; the mayor-elect, Sir Rowland Hill; the aldermen and common council, directing that 1000 troops be mustered to defend the Lord Protector. The lords opposing the Lord Protector had knowledge of the letter before it arrived, possibly through Lord Paget, who was then with the king and Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

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William Paget, Andrew Baynton and Thomas Chaloner were deponents in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 814-18; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

1078 [1054]

K. Hen. 8. Lord Audley made Lord Chauncellour. Queene Anne. Queene Elizabeth borne.

These othes thus being recited and opened to the people, were the occasion that the Pope lost al his interest and iurisdiction heere in Englande, wythin shorte while after. Vpon the occasion and reason whereof, the matter falling out more & more against the Pope, MarginaliaSyr Tho. More.Syr Thomas More, 

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More resigned the chancellorship on 16 May 1532, citing illness and chest pains.

of whome mention is made before, being a great maintainer of the Pope, & a heauy troubler of Christes people, and nowe not liking well of this othe, by Gods good worke, was enforced to resigne vp his Chauncelorship, and to deliuer vp the great seale of England vnto the kings hands. After whom succeeded syr Thomas Audley, MarginaliaTho. Audeley made Lord Chauncellour. Keeper of the great seale, a man in eloquence and giftes of tonge no lesse incomparable, then also for hys godly disposed minde, and fauorable inclination to Christes religiō, worthy of much commendation.

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MarginaliaThe maryage of Queene Anne.These things being done in the parlament, the king wtin short time after, proceeded to the mariage of the foresayd lady Anne Bullen, 

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Famously, Henry and Anne were married twice. A secret ceremony took place on 14 November 1532 (when Anne was found to be pregnant) and a public ceremony on 25 January 1533. [For discussion and speculation over these dates, cf. David Starkey, Six Wives: The Queens of Henry VIII (London, 2004), pp.462-4 and Eric Ives, The Life and Death of Anne Boleyn (Oxford, 2004), pp.170-1].

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mother to our most noble Quene now, 
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Elizabeth I.

who wtout all controuersie was a special comforter & aider of all the professors of Christes gospell, as well of the learned as the vnlearned: her life being also directed according to the same, as her weekely almes did manifestly declare: MarginaliaThe great almes of Quene Anne.Who besides the ordinarye of a C. crownes, aud other apparell that she gaue weekely a yeare before she was crowned, both to men and women, gaue also wonderfull much priuie almes to wydowes and other pore housholders cōtinually til shee was apprehended, and she euer gaue three or foure pounde at a time to the poore people, to buy them kine withall, and sent her Subamner to the townes about where shee lay, that the parishioners should make a bill of all the poore householders in their parish, and some towns receiued 7. 8. or 10. pound to buy kine withal, according as the number of the poore in the Townes were. Shee also maintained many learned mē in Cambridge. Likewise did the Erle of Wilshire her father, and the Lord Rochford her brother, and by them these men were brought in fauour wt the king: of whome some are yet aliue and can testifie the same, which would to God they were nowe as great professors of the gospell of Christ, as then they appeared to be, which were D. Heath, and D. Thirlby: with whome was ioyned the L. Paget, MarginaliaHeath, Thirlby, L. Paget. who at that present was an earnest protestant, & gaue vnto one Rainolde West, Luthers bookes, and other bokes of the Germaines, as Franciscus Lambertus de Sectis, 
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This refers to a book of François Lambert of Avignon entitled Commentarii in Regulam Minoritarum, et contra universas perditionis Sectas (of 1525).

and at that time he red Melancthons Rhetorike 
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This refers to Philip Melanchthon's treatise of 1521, entitled Institutiones Rhetoricae.

openly in Trinitie hall in Cambridge, and was wt his M. Gardiner 
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Foxe is making a reference to the fact that Stephen Gardiner had been for quite some time master of Trinity Hall (1525-51, 1553-5).

a mainetainer of D. Barnes, 
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Robert Barnes and William Paget both held Lutheran ideas, so it is very unlikely that Gardiner maintained Barnes in any serious capacity outside the latter's early academic career.

MarginaliaLord Paget a mainteyner of D. Barnes. and all the Protestantes that were then in Cambridge, & holpe many religious persons out of their cowles.

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MarginaliaThe praise of Quene Anne.It hath bene reported vnto vs by diuers credible persons which were about this Quene, and daily acquainted with her doings concerning her liberall and bountiful distribution to the pore, how her grace caried euer about her a certaine little purse, out of the which she was wont daily to scatter abroad some almes to the needy, thinking no day well spent, wherein some man had not fared the better by some benefite at her handes. And this I write by the relation of certain noble personages which were chiefe & principall of her waiting maides about her, especially the Duches of Richmond by name.

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Also concerning the order of her ladies & gentlewomen about her, one that was her silkwoman, a Gentlewoman MarginaliaThe name of this gentlewoman was Maistres Wilkinson not nowe aliue, but of great credite and also of fame for her worthy doings, did credibly report, that in all her time she neuer saw better order MarginaliaThe good order of the Court in Queene Annes tyme. amongst the ladies & gentlewomē of the Courte, then was in this good Queenes dayes, who kepte her maides and suche as were about her so occupyed in sowing and woorking of shirts & smockes for the poore, that neither was there sene any idlenes then amōgst them, nor any leisure to followe such pastimes as daily are seene now a daies to raigne in princes courtes.

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MarginaliaThe king diuorced from Lady Catherine & frō the Pope, both at one tyme.Thus the king being deuorced from the lady Dowager his brothers wife, maried this gracious Lady, makyng a prosperous and happy change for vs, being diuorced from the foresaide Princesse and also from the Pope both at one time. Notwythstanding as good and godly purposes are neuer without some incommoditie or trouble following, so it happened in this diuorcement that the sayde Princesse procuring from Rome the Popes curse, caused both the king and the realme to be interdited, 

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An interdict is the suspension of all church activities. Foxe may be exaggerating here. England had been placed under interdict in the reign of John (1208), but Clement only threatened this action (which proved moot in due course anyway). [See, T C Price Zimmermann, 'A Note on Clement VII and the Divorce of Henry VIII', in The English Historical Review 82:324 (July 1967), pp.548-52].

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wherof more is hereafter to be spoken.

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MarginaliaAnno 1533In the meane time Quene Anne, shortly after her mariage, being great with childe, the next yeare followynge, which was 1533. after the first diuorcement publikely proclaimed, MarginaliaQueene Anne crowned.was crowned wyth 

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Anne was crowned queen on 1 June 1533.

high solemnitie at Westminster: and not long after her Coronation, the 7. day of September she was brought a bed, and deliuered of a faire Lady, MarginaliaQueene Elizabeth borne. for whose good deliueraunce Te Deum was songe in all places, and great preparation made for the Christening. 
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The account is basically taken out of Hall's Chronicle [for which, see Edward Hall, The Union of the Two Noble and Illustre Families of Lancastre & York, 2 vols., ed. by H Ellis (London, 1809), ii, p.805].

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The Maior and his brethren with 40. of the chiefe Citizens were commaunded to be present withall the nobles and Gentlemen. The kings Pallace and all the wals betweene that and the Friers, was hanged with Arras, and the Friers Churche. Also the Fonte was of siluer, & stoode in the midst of the Churche three steppes high, whych was couered with a fine cloth, and diuers Gentlemen wyth aprons and towels about their neckes, gaue attendance about it. Ouer the Fonte hong a faire Canapy of crimosine Satten fringed wyth Golde. About it was a raile couered wyth saic. Betweene the Quire and the body of the church was a close place with a pan of fire to make the childe ready in. These things thus ordered, the childe was brought into the Hall, and then euery man set forward. First the citizens 2. and 2. Then the gentlemen, Esquiers and Chapleins. Next after folowed the Aldermen and the Maior alone. Next the Maior folowed the kings Councell. Then the kings Chappel. Then Barons, Bishops and Earles. Then came the Earl of Essex, bearing the couered Basons gilte. After him the Marques of Exeter wyth the taper of Virgin waxe. Next him, the Marques Dorset bearynge the Salte. Behinde him the Ladie Marie of Northfolke bearing the Chrisome which was very riche of Perle and stone. The olde Duchesse of Northfolke bare the childe in a Mantle of Purple Veluette, with a longe traine Furred with Ermine. The Duke of Northfolke with hys Marshal rod, went on the right hand of the sayde Duchesse, and the Duke of Suffolke on the left hande. Before them went the Officers of armes. The Countesse of Kente bare the long traine of the childes mantell. Betwene the Countesse and the child, went the Erle of Wilshire on the right hand, and the Erle of Darby on the left hand, supporting the said traine. In the middest ouer the childe was borne a Canapie by the Lord Rochford, the Lord Hussey, the Lord William Haward, and the Lord Thomas Hawarde the elder. In this order they came vnto the Churche dore where the Bishop of London mette it, with diuers Abbots and Byshops, and began the obseruances of the Sacrament. The Archbishop of Caunterbury MarginaliaCranmer godfather to Queene Elizabeth. was Godfather, and the olde Duchesse of Northfolke, and the old Marchionesse of Dorset, widowes, were Godmothers, and the childe was named Elizabeth.

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After all thinges were done at the Churche doore, the child was brought to the Fonte & Christened. This done. Garter the chiefe king of armes cryed aloud: God of his infinite goodnes send prosperous lyfe and longe, to the high and mighty princesse of England, ELIZABETH. Then the Trompettes blew, and the childe was brought vp to the aultare and immediately confirmed by the Archbishop, the Marchionesse of Exceter beyng Godmother. Then the Archbishop of Caunterbury gaue to the Princesse a standing cup of Gold. Then Duchesse of Northfolke gaue to her a standing cup of Golde, fretted with Pearle. The Marchionesse of Dorset, three gilte boles pounced, with a couer. The Marchionesse of Exceter, three standing boles gilt & grauen with a couer. And so after a solemne bancket ended with Ipocras, Wafters, and such lyke in great plenty, they returned in like order agayne vnto the Courte, wyth the Princesse, and so departed.

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At the Maryage of this noble Lady, as there was no small ioy vnto al good and godly men, and no lesse hope of prosperous successe to Gods true Religion, so in like maner on the contrarye parte, the papistes wanted not theyr malicious and secret attemptes, as by the false hipocrisie and fayned holynesse of a false fayned hipocrite this yeare before espyed & found out, may sufficiently appeare what theyr deuilishe deuises and purposes were. For certayne Monks Friers, & other euill disposed persōs, of a deuilish intent, had put into the heades of many of the kinges subiectes, that they had reuelation of God and hys sayntes, þt he was highly displeased wt king Henry, for þe diuorcement of the Lady Katherine, and surmised amongst other thyngs, that God had reuealed to a Nunne, named Elizabeth Barton, 

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Elizabeth Barton is the subject of at least one good biography and a recent article by Richard Rex. [See, Alan Neame, The Holy Maid of Kent: The Life of Elizabeth Barton 1506-1534 (London, 1971) and Richard Rex, 'The execution of the Holy Maid of Kent', in Historical Research 64:155 (October, 1991), pp.216-20.]

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whome they called the holy maide of Kente, MarginaliaThe maide of Kent with her false fained hipocrisie apprehēded. that in case the Kinge proceeded in the sayde deuorce, hee should not be king of this realme, one moneth after, and in the reputation of God, not one day nor hour. This Elizabeth Barton by fals dissimulation practised and shewed to the people, marueilous alteration of her visage and other partes of her body, as if she had bene rapt or in a traunce, & in those fained traunces by false hipocrisie (as though shee had bene inspired of God) she spake many words in rebuking of sinne, and reproouing the Gospell whiche shee called heresie, and among them vttered diuers thyngs to the great reproch of the king and Quene, & to the establishing of Idolatrie, Pilgrimage, and the derogatiō of Gods glory: whych her naughtines being spied out by the great labour and diligence of the Archbishop of Caunterbury, the

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Lord
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