Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Catherine de' Medici

(1519 - 1589)

Daughter of Lorenzo de' Medici, duke of Urbino; married Henri of France 1533; queen of France (1547 - 59); regent for sons Francois II, Charles IX and Henri III

Francois I allied himself with Pope Clement VII in marrying his son to Clement's niece. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Clement VII (Giulio de Medici)

(1479 - 1534) [Kelly]

Illegitimate son of Giuliano de Medici; b. Florence

Archbishop of Florence 1513; cardinal 1513; vice-chancellor 1517; governed Florence from 1519

Pope (1523 - 34); cousin of Pope Leo X

The indulgences granted by Pope Leo X to the guild of Our Lady at Boston had been granted previously by Innocent VIII and Julius II and were later renewed by Clement VII. Further indulgences granted by Nicholas V, Pius II and Sixtus IV were also renewed by Clement at the request of Henry VIII. 1570, p. 1347; 1576, p. 1150; 1583, p. 1178.

[Back to Top]

After Francois I was released from captivity in Spain, Clement VII released him from his oath, fearing the power of the emperor in Italy. He contracted an alliance with the Venetians and other princes. 1570, p. 1122; 1576, p. 961; 1583, p. 987.

Clement was captured by the duke of Bourbon when he sacked Rome in 1527. 1570, p. 1122; 1576, p. 961; 1583, p. 987.

He was besieged in the Castello Sant'Angelo after taking refuge there with many cardinals. He surrendered in July and was able to issue bulls, but was kept imprisoned in the fortress for six months. 1570, p. 1123; 1576, p. 961; 1583, p. 988.

Henry VIII, encouraged by Cardinal Wolsey, began to question the validity of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. He sought the advice of universities and learned men, but needed the assent of the pope and the emperor to a divorce. 1570, p. 1192; 1576, p. 1021; 1583, p. 1049.

Stephen Gardiner was sent as ambassador to Rome by Henry VIII during the time of Clement VII to deal with the matter of the king's divorce and to promote Thomas Wolsey as pope. 1570, pp. 1125-28, 1193; 1576, pp. 963-66, 1021; 1583, pp. 990-92, 1049.

Thanks to the influence of Lorenzo Pucci and other cardinals, Clement VII initially viewed the proposed divorce between Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon favourably. 1570, p. 1457; 1576, p. 1242; 1583, p. 1279.

Clement sent Cardinal Campeggi as legate to England to join with Cardinal Wolsey to consider the matter of the king's divorce. 1570, p. 1193; 1576, p. 1021; 1583, p. 1049.

Clement pronounced a sentence definitive against Henry VIII's divorce from Catherine of Aragon. 1570, pp. 1458-59; 1576, p. 1243; 1583, p. 1280.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edmund Bonner

(d. 1569) [ODNB]

Archdeacon of Leicester 1535; bishop of Hereford 1538; bishop of London (1540 - 49, 1553 - 59)

Henry VIII sent injunctions to Bonner regarding the abolishing of images in churches. 1563, pp. 685-86.

Edmund Bonner wrote a preface to Stephen Gardiner's De vera obedientia, in which he expressed agreement with Gardiner's favouring of King Henry's marriage to Anne Boleyn and his position as head of the church. 1570, p. 1206; 1576, p. 1032; 1583, pp. 1059-60.

Stephen Gardiner was a resident ambassador to France in 1538, when Edmund Bonner, through the efforts of Thomas Cromwell, was brought in to replace him. There were great disagreements between the two, since Bonner at the time was in favour of reform. Bonner owed his main preferments to Cromwell. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

[Back to Top]

Bonner, when archdeacon of Leicester and ambassador in France, accused Gardiner of papistry. 1570, p. 1233; 1576, p. 1056; 1583, p. 1082.

Bonner sent a declaration to Thomas Cromwell of Stephen Gardiner's evil behaviour. 1570, pp. 1241-44; 1576, pp. 1063-66; 1583, pp. 1090-92.

King Henry wrote to Bonner in France, asking him to assist those printing English bibles in Paris. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1191.

Cromwell was instrumental in getting Edmund Bonner's nomination to the bishopric of London. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1191.

Although Bonner performed his duties well as far as Henry VIII was concerned, he displeased the king of France, who asked for him to be recalled. Henry recalled him, giving him the bishopric of London, and sent Sir John Wallop to replace him. 1570, p. 1245; 1576, p. 1066; 1583, p. 1093.

Henry VIII wrote to Bonner commanding that excess holy days be abolished. 1563, p. 682; 1570, p. 1441; 1576, p. 1229; 1583, p. 1259.

After Anne Askew had been examined by the quest and the mayor of London, she was imprisoned in the Counter and then examined by Bonner. 1563, p. 670; 1570, p. 1414; 1576, p. 1205; 1583, p. 1235.

Bonner witnessed Anne Askew's confession. 1563, p. 673; 1570, p. 1416; 1576, p. 1207; 1583, p. 1237.

Richard Rich and Edmund Bonner attempted to persuade Anne Askew to change her views after her condemnation. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

Edward Seymour stood against the bishops of Chichester, Norwich, Lincoln, London and others at the consultation at Windsor in the first year of Edward VI's reign. 1570, p. 1551; 1576, p. 1322; 1583, p. 1372.

Bonner was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1212; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Bonner brought Richard Mekins to court, charged with heresy. Although the witnesses against him gave contradictory evidence, the jury were told to allow them. The jury brought an indictment and Mekins was executed. 1563, p. 613; 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1174; 1583, p. 1202.

Edward VI's commissioners attempted to administer an oath to Bishop Bonner and the clergy of St Paul's and gave Bonner a list of injunctions. He made a protestation, which he subsequently repented and recanted. He was pardoned, but committed to the Fleet for a short period. 1570, pp. 1501-02; 1576, pp. 1272-73; 1583, pp. 1309-10.

[Back to Top]

Edward VI's councillors and Edward Seymour wrote to Thomas Cranmer, directing that candles no longer be carried on Candlemas, nor palms on Palm Sunday, nor should ashes be used on Ash Wednesday. Cranmer immediately wrote to the other bishops, including Bonner, to inform them of the new directive. Bonner consented to the changes and wrote to Thomas Thirlby to inform him of them. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

[Back to Top]

The council wrote further to Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. He wrote to Edmund Bonner, directing him to carry out the order in London, and Bonner in turn wrote to Thomas Thirlby. 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Bonner continued to hold private masses in St Paul's, and the king's council ordered these to be stopped. Bonner then wrote to the dean and chapter to that effect. 1563, pp. 692-93; 1570, p. 1492; 1576, p. 1265; 1583, p. 1302.

Another letter was sent by the king and council to Bonner, rebuking him and urging him to use the Book of Common Prayer. Bonner again wrote to the dean and chapter. 1563, pp. 693-94; 1570, p. 1494; 1576, p. 1266; 1583, p. 1303.

Hearing of the death of Thomas Seymour and of the rebellions in the kingdom, Bonner began to slacken his pastoral diligence. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 13103.

Having knowledge of rebellions stirring in the realm and of slackness in religious reform in the city of London, Edward VI called Edmund Bonner to come before his council. The council ordered him to preach a sermon at Paul's Cross in three weeks' time and provided him with the articles upon which he was to preach. 1563, p. 695; 1570, p. 1495; 1576, p. 1267; 1583, p. 1304.

[Back to Top]

John Hooper and William Latymer, in a letter to the king, denounced Bonner for his sermon at St Paul's, which went contrary to the instructions given by the king's commissioners. 1563, pp. 696-97; 1570, p. 1503; 1576, p. 1274; 1583, p. 1311.

Thomas Cranmer, archbishop of Canterbury, Nicholas Ridley, bishop of Rochester, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May, dean of St Paul's, were commissioned to examine Edmund Bonner. 1563, p. 697; 1570, p. 1504; 1576, p. 1275; 1583, p. 1312.

Bonner was summoned to appear before the commissioners. He behaved haughtily, ridiculing his accusers and the commissioners, and spoke in favour of the mass. He appeared first on 10 September 1549 before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre and William May. Sir Thomas Smith was absent. 1563, pp. 698-99; 1570, pp. 1504-06; 1576, pp. 1275-77; 1583, pp. 1312-14.

[Back to Top]

Bonner appeared for the second time on 13 September before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir William Petre, Sir Thomas Smith and William May and was further examined. 1563, pp. 699-704; 1570, pp. 1506-08; 1576, pp. 1277-79; 1583, pp. 1314-17.

Bonner appeared for the third time on 16 September before Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Sir Thomas Smith and William May to answer the articles put to him at the previous session. John Hooper and William Latymer also appeared in order to purge themselves against the slanders of Bonner. 1563, pp. 704-709; 1570, pp. 1508-11; 1576, pp. 1279-80; 1583, pp. 1317-22.

[Back to Top]

The commissioners, finding Bonner's answers to the articles put to him to be unsatisfactory, received witnesses against him: John Cheke, Henry Markham, John Joseph, John Douglas and Richard Chambers. Bonner submitted a set of questions the witnesses were to answer. 1563, p. 707; 1570, p. 1510; 1576, p. 1280; 1583, p. 1320.

[Back to Top]

Bonner appeared before the commissioners for the fourth time on 18 September, at which session new articles were drawn up and new witnesses received: Sir John Mason, Sir Thomas Chaloner, William Cecil, Armygell Wade and William Hunnings. 1563, pp. 704-713; 1570, pp. 1508-13; 1576, pp. 1279-82; 1583, pp. 1317-23.

[Back to Top]

On the following day, 19 September, Bonner's registrar appeared to report that Bonner was too ill to attend the session. 1563, p. 713; 1570, p. 1513; 1576, p. 1282; 1583, p. 1323.

Bonner appeared for the fifth time before the commissioners on 20 September. During an interval, he instructed Gilbert Bourne, his chaplain, Robert Warnington, his commissary, and Robert Johnson, his registrar, to tell the mayor and aldermen of London to avoid reformed preachers. Bonner made his first appellation to the king. As a result of his behaviour during the proceedings, he was committed to the Marshalsea. 1563, pp. 713-717; 1570, pp. 1513-16; 1576, pp. 1282-85; 1583, pp. 1324-26.

[Back to Top]

Bonner appeared for the sixth time before the commissioners on 23 September, when he presented a general recusation against all the commissioners and a second appellation to the king. A letter was read from Bonner to the mayor of London, Henry Amcottes, and aldermen. 1563, pp. 717-18; 1570, p. 1516; 1576, p. 1285; 1583, pp. 1326-27.

[Back to Top]

Bonner' seventh appearance before the commissioners took place on 1 October. He presented a declaration, an appellation and a supplication to the king. The commissioners pronounced their sentence definitive. 1563, pp. 718-26; 1570, pp. 1516-19; 1576, pp. 1285-88; 1583, pp. 1327-30.

Bonner was imprisoned in the Marshalsea and deprived of his bishopric under Edward VI and Edward Seymour. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1296.

Bonner remained in prison until the death of Edward VI. 1563, pp. 717-18; 1570, p. 1518; 1576, p. 1287; 1583, p. 1329.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward Fox

(1496 - 1538) [ODNB]

Diplomat; BA Cambridge 1517; MA 1520; doctor 1532; provost of King's College (1528 - 38); secretary to Wolsey 1526

Archdeacon of Leicester (1531 - 35); dean of Salisbury (1533 - 38); archdeacon of Dorset (1533 - 38); royal almoner (c. 1532 - 36); bishop of Hereford (1536 - 38)

Stephen Gardiner and Edward Fox urged leniency on Cardinal Wolsey when dealing with Robert Barnes. They stood surety for him and convinced him to abjure. 1563, pp. 601-02; 1570, pp. 1364-65; 1576, pp. 1164-65; 1583, pp. 1192-93.

Edward Fox accopmanied Stephen Gardiner to Rome to put the case for the king's divorce to Clement VII. 1570, p. 1457; 1576, p. 1242; 1583, p. 1279.

Edward Fox was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1211; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

After the Act of Supremacy, Henry VIII attempted to improve relations with other monarchs by sending ambassadors. Edward Fox was sent to the German princes. 1570, p. 1218; 1576, p. 1043; 1583, p. 1070.

Fox attended a synod in 1537 with other bishops and learned men and with Thomas Cromwell as vicar-general. Fox opposed retaining the seven sacraments. He gave an oration to the bishops. 1563, p. 594; 1570, p. 1351; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1182.

In a letter to Thomas Cromwell, Edmund Bonner, Fox's successor to the see of Hereford, asked for help in meeting any financial obligations left by Fox. 1570, p. 1240; 1576, p. 1062; 1583, p. 1088.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
François I

(1494 - 1547)

King of France (1515 - 47)

Having engaged in wars against Charles V, allied to Henry VIII, François I was captured at the battle of Pavia by the duke of Bourbon and the viceroy of Naples and taken into Spain in 1525. 1570, p. 1122; 1576, p. 960; 1583, p. 987.

François was imprisoned for over a year, until he agreed with the emperor to focus their joint efforts against the Lutherans and Turks. François left his eldest sons, François and Henri, behind as pledges, but he was absolved of his oath by the pope. 1570, p. 1122; 1576, p. 960; 1583, p. 987.

Henry VIII ordered a religious procession in London in 1535 because the French king was ill. 1570, p. 1218; 1576, p. 1043; 1583, p. 1070.

After the Act of Supremacy, Henry VIII attempted to improve relations with other monarchs by sending ambassadors. Sir Francis Brian was sent to François I. 1570, p. 1218; 1576, p. 1043; 1583, p. 1070.

Paul III sent Cardinal Pole to the French king to stir him to war against Henry VIII. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1087.

François I of France and Emperor Charles V retained Robert Granceter, a condemned traitor, and refused to hand him over to Henry VIII. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1087.

François had allied himself with Pope Clement VII in marrying his son to Clement's niece. He also married his daughter to James V of Scotland, breaking an agreement with Henry VIII. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

Cromwell was instrumental in getting Edmund Bonner's nomination to the bishopric of London. He procured letters from King Henry to François I that resulted in a licence being granted to print bibles in English at the University of Paris. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1191.

Although Edmund Bonner performed his ambassadorial duties well as far as Henry VIII was concerned, he displeased the king of France, who asked for him to be recalled. Henry recalled him and sent Sir John Wallop to replace him. 1570, p. 1245; 1576, p. 1066; 1583, p. 1093.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Henri II

(1519 - 1559)

2nd son of François I of France; duke of Orleans (1519 - 36); dauphin (1536 - 47)

King of France (1547 - 1559)

A marriage was proposed between the duke of Orleans and Princess Mary of England. The French raised questions of the validity of the marriage of her parents, and the proposed marriage did not take place. 1563, p. 456; 1570, p. 1192; 1576, p. 1021; 1583, p. 1049.

François I allied himself with Pope Clement VII in marrying his son to Clement's niece. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

Learning of the rebellions in England in 1549, Henri II recalled his ambassador and attacked Jersey and Guernsey. The attack was repulsed and the French ships retreated. 1570, p. 1501; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Madeleine de Valois

(1520 - 1537) [ODNB]

Queen of Scots, consort of James V; 2nd daughter, 4th child of François I of France

François I married his daughter to James V of Scotland, breaking an agreement with Henry VIII. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Marguerite de Valois

(1492 - 1549)

Sister of François I of France; married (2) Henry of Navarre in 1525; author and patron

After the death of Queen Jane, François I attempted to marry his sister to Henry VIII. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Simon Haynes (Heynes)

(d. 1552) [ODNB]

Clergyman and religious reformer; BA Cambridge 1515/16; MA 1519; BTh 1528; DTh 1531

Dean of Exeter (1537 - 52); imprisoned in the Fleet in 1543

Simon Haynes was reported to Stephen Gardiner by William Symonds and John London to be a common receiver of suspected persons at Windsor. 1570, p. 1389; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, p. 1214.

Thomas Southern and Thomas Brerewood accused their dean, Simon Haynes, of heresy and treason. He was committed to the Fleet until friends procured his release. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

In a letter to Thomas Cromwell, Edmund Bonner asked for financial help, mentioning that he owed money to Thomas Thirlby and Simon Haynes. 1570, p. 1240; 1576, p. 1062; 1583, p. 1088.

Haynes was praised by Bonner for his reformed views. 1570, p. 1240; 1576, p. 1062; 1583, p. 1089.

Henry Holbeach, Richard Coxe, Simon Haynes, Richard Morison and Christopher Nevinson, king's visitors, were present at the disputations at Oxford in 1549 with Peter Martyr. 1570, pp. 1552; 1576, p. 1323; 1583, p. 1373.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Stephen Gardiner

(c. 1495x8 - 1555) [ODNB]

Theologian, administrator; BCnL Cambridge 1518; DCL 1521; DCnL 1522; chancellor of Cambridge

Principal secretary to the king 1529; ambassador to France

Bishop of Winchester (1531 - 51, 1553 - 55)

Thomas Cromwell, Thomas More and Stephen Gardiner served together in Thomas Wolsey's household. 1563, p. 592; 1570, p. 1347; 1576, p. 1150; 1583, p. 1178.

Gardiner and Edward Fox urged leniency on Cardinal Wolsey when dealing with Robert Barnes. They stood surety for him and convinced him to abjure. 1563, pp. 601-02; 1570, pp. 1364-65; 1576, pp. 1164-65; 1583, pp. 1192-93.

Stephen Gardiner was sent as ambassador to Rome by Henry VIII during the time of Clement VII to deal with the matter of the king's divorce and to promote Thomas Wolsey as pope. Both the king and Wolsey wrote letters to him. 1570, pp. 1125-28, 1193; 1576, pp. 963-66, 1021; 1583, pp. 990-92, 1049.

Shortly after Gardiner became secretary to King Henry, he and William Fitzwilliam were assigned by the king to ensure that Thomas Wolsey's goods were not stolen after his deprivation of his offices, but returned to the king. 1570, p. 1130; 1576, p. 967; 1583, p. 994.

Richard Bayfield was tried before John Stokesley, assisted by Stephen Gardiner and others. 1563, p. 484; 1570, p. 1161; 1576, p. 993; 1583, p. 1021.

John Frith was taken first to the archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth, then to the bishop of Winchester at Croydon, and then to London to plead his case before the assembled bishops. He was examined there by the bishops of London, Winchester and Lincoln. 1563, pp. 501-03; 1570, pp. 1176-78; 1576, pp. 1006-08; 1583, pp. 1034-35.

[Back to Top]

Andrew Hewett was examined by Stokesley, Gardiner and Longland. 1563, p. 506; 1570, p. 1180; 1576, p. 1009; 1583, p. 1036.

The archbishop of Canterbury (Cranmer), along with the bishops of London (Stokesley), Winchester (Gardiner), Bath and Wells (Clerk) and Lincoln (Longland) and other clergy went to see Queen Catherine. She failed to attend when summoned over 15 days, and they pronounced that she and the king were divorced. 1570, p. 1200; 1576, p. 1027; 1583, p. 1055.

[Back to Top]

Gardiner swore an oath of allegiance to Henry VIII as head of the church. 1570, p. 1203; 1576, p. 1030; 1583, p. 1057.

In his De vera obedientia, Gardiner challenged the authority of the pope and argued against the validity of the king's marriage to Catherine of Aragon. 1570, pp. 1204-06; 1576, pp. 1031-32; 1583, pp. 1058-59.

Gardiner was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1211; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Gardiner was sent with a Henry VIII's answer to Francis I, king of France, regarding Henry's supremacy over the English church. 1570, p. 1221; 1576, p. 1045; 1583, p. 1072.

Gardiner was suspected of involvement in the downfall of Anne Boleyn, and urged the king to disinherit Elizabeth. 1570, pp. 1233, 1243; 1576, p. 1056; 1583, pp. 1082, 1083.

Gardiner was a resident ambassador to France in 1538, when Edmund Bonner, through the efforts of Thomas Cromwell, was brought in to replace him. There were great disagreements between the two, since Bonner at the time was in favour of reform. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

The bearward who had a book belonging to Archbishop Cranmer's secretary intended giving it to Sir Anthony Browne or Stephen Gardiner. 1570, p. 1356; 1576, p. 1157; 1583, p. 1186.

In a letter to Henry VIII, Philip Melancthon called Gardiner wicked and impudent. 1570, p. 1341; 1576, p. 1145; 1583, p. 1173.

Bonner sent a declaration to Cromwell of Stephen Gardiner's evil behaviour. 1570, pp. 1241-44; 1576, pp. 1063-66; 1583, pp. 1090-92.

Gardiner urged Henry VIII to withdraw his defence of religious reform in order to ensure peace within the realm and to restore good relations with foreign rulers. 1570, pp. 1296; 1576, p. 1109; 1583, p. 1135.

Stephen Gardiner urged Henry VIII to use the case against John Lambert as a means of displaying the king's willingness to deal harshly with heresy. 1563, pp. 533-34; 1570, p. 1281; 1576, p. 1095; 1583, pp. 1121-22.

Cranmer had sent letters for Henry VIII to sign relating to reform in the church. Gardiner convinced the king that these reforms would jeopardise a league with the king of France and the emperor, so the letters were never signed. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

Gardiner disputed with Lambert during his trial. 1563, pp. 535-36; 1570, pp. 1282-83; 1576, p. 1097; 1583, p. 1123.

Stephen Gardiner was Thomas Cromwell's chief opponent. 1563, p. 598; 1570, p. 1359; 1576, p. 1160; 1583, p. 1189.

Stephen Gardiner complained to the king about the sermon of Robert Barnes preached during Lent at Paul's Cross. He disputed with Barnes, and Richard Coxe and Thomas Robinson acted as arbiters. Gardiner then submitted articles against Barnes. 1570, p. 1371; 1576, pp. 1169-70; 1583, p. 1198.

Adam Damplip was brought before Thomas Cranmer, Stephen Gardiner, Richard Sampson and others and examined. 1563, p. 657; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1194; 1583, p. 1224.

Thomas Broke, Ralph Hare, James Cocke and James Barber were sent from Calais with their accusers to England to be examined by Cranmer, Gardiner, Sampson and other bishops. 1563, p. 661; 1570, p. 1401; 1576, p. 1195; 1583, p. 1224.

William Symonds and John London kept notes of Anthony Pearson's sermons at Windsor. They included the names of all those who frequented the sermons and reported all of these to Stephen Gardiner, who in turn reported to the king and received a commission for a search at Windsor. 1570, pp. 1389-90; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, pp. 1213-14.

[Back to Top]

Gardiner had Simon Haynes and Philip Hoby committed to the Fleet, but their friends secured their release. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

Gardiner conducted the third examination of John Marbeck himself. He ordered Marbeck to be placed in irons and kept in isolation. 1570, pp. 1391-92; 1576, pp. 1186-88; 1583, pp. 1215-16.

On the orders of Stephen Gardiner, John Massie took Adam Damplip to Calais. 1570, p. 1400; 1576, p. 1193; 1583, p. 1223.

John Capon and others of the judges in the trial of Marbeck, Testwood, Pearson and Filmer at Windsor sent a message to Stephen Gardiner in favour of John Marbeck. Gardiner went straight to the king and obtained a pardon. 1570, p. 1397; 1576, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1220.

After the burning of Filmer, Pearsons and Testwood, Capon sent Robert Ockham with a report to Stephen Gardiner. 1570, p. 1398; 1576, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1221.

Gardiner was one of the questioners at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

Katherine Parr read and studied the scriptures and discussed them with her chaplains. The king was aware of this and approved, so she began to debate matters of religion with him. When the king became more ill-tempered because of his sore leg, her enemies, especially Stephen Gardiner and Thomas Wriothesley, took the opportunity to turn the king against her. 1570, pp. 1422-23; 1576, pp. 1212-13; 1583, pp. 1242-43.

[Back to Top]

Gardiner and other enemies of Katherine Parr planned to accuse and arrest Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit and search their quarters for books and other evidence to use against the queen. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

During Henry VIII's final illness, Sir Anthony Browne tried unsuccessfully to get Stephen Gardiner reinstated in the king's will. 1570, p. 1478; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1291.

After the death of Henry VIII, the duke of Suffolk related to Thomas Cranmer how Stephen Gardiner had nearly been arrested at the time of the execution of Germaine Gardiner. He confessed his fault to the king and was pardoned. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1290.

Stephen Gardiner preached a sermon contrary to King Edward's injunctions. He was arrested and taken to the Tower by Sir Anthony Wingfield and Sir Ralph Sadler; Sadler and William Hunnings were instructed to seal off doors to his house. He was transferred to the Fleet. 1563, pp. 728, 760; 1570, pp. 1521, 1529; 1576, pp. 1297, 1304; 1583, pp. 1340, 1353-54.

[Back to Top]

Gardiner wrote to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, the Lord Protector and others while imprisoned in the Fleet. 1563, pp. 728-54; 1570, pp. 1522-25; 1576, pp. 1297-1300; 1583, pp. 1340-50.

Gardiner was released out of the Fleet by a general pardon, but was placed under house arrest for failure to conform. Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Smith and William Cecil were sent to him. He was called before the council. 1563, p. 755; 1570, pp. 1525-26; 1576, p. 1301; 1583, p. 1351.

Gardiner was imprisoned in the Tower with Cuthbert Tunstall under Edward VI and Edward Seymour. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1296.

After Gardiner had been in the Tower for nearly a year, Sir William Paulet and Sir William Petre visited and urged him to admit his fault. Paulet, Petre, the earl of Warwick and Sir William Herbert delivered the king's letters to him. 1563, pp. 761-62; 1570, pp. 1529-30; 1576, p. 1304; 1583, p. 1354.

[Back to Top]

Edward Seymour, John Russell, John Dudley and Sir William Petre visited Stephen Gardiner in the Tower at various times to attempt to get him to accept the king's reforms. 1563, pp. 766; 1570, p. 1532; 1576, p. 1306; 1583, p. 1356.

Articles were put to him to answer. 1563, pp. 754-68; 1570, pp. 1525-34; 1576, pp. 1300-07; 1583, pp. 1350-57.

When Sir William Herbert and Sir William Petre went to Stephen Gardiner in the Tower with new articles, they took with them a canon and a civil lawyer: Nicholas Ridley and Richard Goodrich. 1563, p. 768; 1570, p. 1534; 1576, p. 1307; 1583, p. 1357.

After Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

William Paget, Andrew Baynton and Thomas Chaloner were deponents in the case of Gardiner. 1563, pp. 814-18; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

Gardiner was examined and deprived of his bishopric. 1563, pp. 814-67; 1570, pp. 1536-37; 1576, pp. 1309-10; 1583, pp. 1359-60.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Cromwell

(in or bef. 1485 - 1540) [ODNB]

Lawyer; king's secretary; chief minister

Earl of Essex 1540; beheaded gruesomely

Thomas Cromwell was the son of a smith. He had an impressive memory and was skilled in languages. He was retained by the English merchants in Antwerp as clerk. He accompanied Geoffrey Chambers to Rome to obtain indulgences for the guild of Our Lady in Boston. 1570, p. 1346; 1576, p. 1149; 1583, pp. 1177-78.

[Back to Top]

As a young man Cromwell fought with the French at Garigliano. He was then destitute in Italy and was helped by the Italian merchant banker Francesco Frescobaldi. Cromwell years later repaid him with generous interest when Frescobaldi was impoverished in England. 1570, pp. 1357-58; 1576, pp. 1158-59; 1583, pp. 1186-87.

[Back to Top]

Cromwell confessed to archbishop Cranmer that he had been wild in his youth. He was at the siege of Rome with the duke of Bourbon. 1570, p. 1346; 1576, p. 1149; 1583, pp. 1177-78.

Cromwell, Thomas More and Stephen Gardiner served together in Thomas Wolsey's household. 1563, p. 592; 1570, p. 1347; 1576, p. 1150; 1583, p. 1178.

Cromwell was one of Wolsey's chief councillors and was active in the dissolution of the monasteries. After Wolsey's fall and his departure to Southwell, Cromwell entered the king's service. 1570, pp. 1132, 1347; 1576, pp. 969, 1150; 1583, pp. 996, 1179.

Cromwell was knighted, made master of the jewels and admitted to the king's council. Two years later he was made master of the rolls. Shortly before the birth of Prince Edward, Cromwell was created earl of Essex and appointed viceregent. 1570, p. 1348; 1576, p. 1151; 1583, p. 1179.

Cromwell discovered and made public fraudulent miracles. 1570, p. 1359; 1576, p. 1160; 1583, p. 1188.

Elizabeth Barton prophesied that if the king divorced Queen Catherine and married Anne Boleyn, he would not reign more than a month thereafter. Through the efforts of Cranmer, Cromwell and Latimer, she was condemned and executed with some of her supporters. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, pp. 1054-55.

[Back to Top]

Cromwell urged King Henry to destroy the monastic houses and to grant the lands to the nobility and gentlemen. 1570, p. 1350; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1181.

Edward Lee was sent, under Cromwell, to visit the monasteries and nunneries to release all those in religious orders who wished to leave. 1570, p. 1218; 1576, p. 1043; 1583, p. 1070.

Cromwell gave an oration at the synod in 1537 of bishops and learned men. 1570, p. 1351; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1182.

Gardiner was a resident ambassador to France in 1538, when Edmund Bonner, through the efforts of Thomas Cromwell, was brought in to replace him. Bonner owed his major preferments to Cromwell. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

Bonner sent a declaration to Cromwell of Stephen Gardiner's evil behaviour. 1570, pp. 1241-44; 1576, pp. 1063-66; 1583, pp. 1090-92.

Through the efforts of Cromwell, the destruction of the abbeys and religious houses was accomplished. 1570, p. 1255; 1576, p. 1075; 1583, p. 1101.

At the end of John Lambert's trial, the king had Cromwell read the sentence of condemnation. On the day of Lambert's execution, Cromwell asked for his forgiveness. 1563, pp. 537, 569; 1570, pp. 1283-84; 1576, pp. 1097-98; 1583, pp. 1123-24.

The king sent Cromwell and the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Thomas Cranmer to reassure him after his opposition to the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1111; 1583, p. 1136.

The wife of Thomas Broke wrote to Thomas Cromwell, complaining of the way the imprisoned men in Calais, especially her husband, were treated. Cromwell wrote to the commissioners in Calais, commanding that Broke and a number of others be sent to England. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

[Back to Top]

Cromwell was instrumental in obtaining Edmund Bonner's nomination to the bishopric of London. Cromwell procured letters from King Henry to Francois I that resulted in a licence being granted to print bibles in English at Paris. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1191.

When printing of English bibles was stopped in Paris, Cromwell got the presses and types sent to London. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1163; 1583, p. 1191.

Stephen Gardiner was Cromwell's chief opponent. Cromwell had other enemies as well, and in 1540 he was suddenly arrested in the council chamber and committed to the Tower. He was charged with heresy and treason. 1563, p. 598; 1570, p. 1359; 1576, pp. 1160-61; 1583, p. 1189.

Cromwell, having made an oration and prayer, was beheaded by an incompetent axeman. 1563, p. 598; 1570, pp. 1361-62; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1190.

Stephen Gardiner recalled that Cromwell spent a day and a half investigating a matter between Sir Francis Bryan and Gardiner, finally declaring Gardiner an honest man. 1563, p. 756; 1570, p. 1526; 1576, p. 1301; 1583, p. 1351.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Thirlby

(1506? - 1570) [ODNB]

BCL Cambridge by 1521; DCL 1528; DCnL 1530; auditor for Cambridge University 1530/31

Archdeacon of Ely by 1534; bishop of Westminster (1540 - 50); bishop of Norwich (1550 - 54); bishop of Ely (1554 - 50)

When Thomas Thirlby was a scholar at Cambridge, he often played the recorder in his room. At such times Thomas Bilney, living in the room above, would begin to pray. 1563, p. 482.

Thomas Thirlby was one of the learned men at Cambridge supported by the Boleyns. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Thirlby was resident ambassador to France with Stephen Gardiner in 1538. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

In a letter to Thomas Cromwell, Edmund Bonner asks for financial help, mentioning that he owes money to Thomas Thirlby and Simon Haynes. 1570, p. 1240; 1576, p. 1062; 1583, p. 1088.

Edward VI's councillors and Edward Seymour wrote to Thomas Cranmer, directing that candles no longer be carried on Candlemas, nor palms on Palm Sunday, nor should ashes be used on Ash Wednesday. Cranmer immediately wrote to the other bishops, including Bonner, to inform them of the new directive. Bonner consented to the changes and wrote to Thomas Thirlby to inform him of them. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

[Back to Top]

The council wrote further to Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. He wrote to Edmund Bonner, directing him to carry out the order in London, and Bonner in turn wrote to Thomas Thirlby. 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Thomas Thirlby was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 829-30, 855.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Blaydon [Bledon]

Gateshead

OS grid ref: NZ 175 625

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Blois

[Bloys]

Loire valley, France

Coordinates: 47° 35' 38" N, 1° 19' 41" E

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cham

Bavaria, Germany

Coordinates: 49° 13' 0" N, 12° 39' 0" E

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cherry Burton [Cheriburton]

East Riding of Yorkshire

OS grid ref: SE 995 425

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Chiswick [Cheswike]

west London

OS grid ref: TQ 205 785

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Dereham

Norfolk

OS grid ref: TF 985 125

1112 [1088]

K. Hen. 8. Boner Ambaßadour in Fraunce. A letter of Boner to the Lord Cromwell.

The Frenche king also digressing from his promise and treaty, made alliance wyth the Bishop of Rome, Clement in marying the Dolphine to hys Niece, called Katherine de Medicis.

The sayd Frenche kyng moreouer, contrary to his contracte made, married his daughter to the king of Scottes. All which were preiudiciall: and put the kinge (no doubt) in some feare and perplexity (though otherwise a stout and valiant Prince) to see the Pope, the Emperour, the French king, and king of Scottes so bent against him.

[Back to Top]

And yet all this notwithstanding, the Lord stil defended the iustnes of his cause against them all. For although the French king was so sette on by the Pope, and so linked in mariage with the Scots, and lacked nothing now but only occasion to inuade the realme of England: yet notwythstanding he hearing now of the birth of Prince Edwarde, the kinges sonne by Queene Iane, and vnderstandinge also by the death of the sayde Queene Iane, that the Kyng was a widower, and perceiuing moreouer, talk to be that the king would ioyne in mariage with the Germains, began to waxe more calme and colde, and to geue much more gentle wordes, and to demeane him selfe more curtuously, labour to mary the Queene of Nauare hys sister to the king.

[Back to Top]

The Ambassadors resident then in France for the king, were Ste. Gardiner, with Doctor Thirleby, &c. Whyche Steuen Gard. what he wrought secreately for the Popes deuotion, I haue not expressely to charge him. Whether he so did, or what he did, the Lord knoweth all. But thys is certaine, that when D. Boner Archedeacon then of Leicester, was sente into Fraunce by the Kinge (throughe the meanes of the Lord Cromwell (to succeede Steuen Gardinar in Ambassie, which was about the yeare of our Lord 1538. Marginalia

Anno. 1538.

Doct. Boner, the kyngs Ambassadour in Fraunce

he found such dealing in the sayd Bishop of Winchester, as was not greatly to be trusted, beside the vnkynde partes of the sayde Byshop againste the foresayde Boner, comming then from the King and Lorde Cromwell, as was not to be liked. 
Commentary  *  Close
Edmund Bonner's career

The letter from Tyndale to Frith obviously came into Foxe's hands after the first edition was published, and the original of it has now been lost. It was printed by Henry Walter in the Parker Society edition of Tyndale's Works [1848] (vol 1, p. liiii [54]). Wilkins cites Corpus Christ College, Cambridge MS 8, fol 401 - and Foxe is known to have had access to Parker's collection.

[Back to Top]

The king's answer to the rebels of Lincolnshire, and the story of the rising there, are taken from Hall (fols 229-232). The source of Bonner's letter is now known, but Foxe was clearly working from originals or a close copy. They are calendared in the Letters and Papers¸ but the editor cites Foxe as their source [XII, 2, 144; 269]. The Articles devised by the Kynges Highnes Maiestie to stablyshe Christen quietnes and vnitie amonge vs, and to auoyde contentious opinio[n]s (London: Thomas Berthelet, 1536 - STC 10033) would have been available to Foxe in the printed edition. There is a copy of Bonner's oath against the pope in BL Add MS 38656 fol 3b, although this was probably not the copy which Foxe used. The form of oath was common to all bishops. The description of the 'evil behaviour' of Stephen Gardiner 'in trembling and leaping of his flesh' in the 1583 edition carries the comment that Bucer had also noted it in De Coelibatu. This is a reference to Martin Bucer's Gratulatio … ad Ecclesiam Anglicanam de Religionis Christi ... Angli conviciatrices Epistolas, De coelibatu sacerdotum et coenobitarum. The work was published in 1548, and promptly translated into English by Thomas Hobye, then residing with Bucer as a pupil in Strasbourg (the translator signing off 'At Argentyne, Kalendis Februarii'), and published by Richard Jugge under the title: The gratulation of the mooste famous clerke M. Martin Bucer: a man of no lesse learninge and lyterature, then godlye studie and example of lyuing, vnto the churche of Englande for the restitucion of Christes religion. And hys answere vnto the two raylinge epistles of Steue[n], Bisshoppe of Winchester, concerninge the vnmaried state of preestes and cloysterars, wherein is euidently declared, that it is against the lawes of God, and of his churche to require of all suche as be and must be admitted to preesthood, to refrain from holye matrimonie (STC - 3963). The issue at stake was the theological and scriptural justification for celibacy, discussed at length, and with reference to the disputation in Strasbourg to which Foxe refers. In the treatise, Bucer answered Gardiner with progressively greater demonstrations of righteous anger, giving as good as he got; 'Herin therefore let Wynchester do the office of a bishop, & shewe (yf he can) thy trewe arguments that we are in an erroure, and cease to depraue by suche trifling and ungodly tawntes the dyuine and holie fathers sentences and to peruerte and mistake with his rayling sophistrie … & to scrape together with moche a do (wynking at our perfecte & sounde arguments here and there a worde by his scoffinges …. with that currishe and dogishe eloquence, whereof he coulde in thes his writings against me, make no ther measure nor ende' [no sig]. Bucer accused Winchester of having accused him of 'ignoraunce and arrogantye' [sig. G] in attributing interpretations of Greek pre-Christian writers that he had not advanced. He finally contended, in the passage to which Foxe no doubt referred, that Gardiner had not written or acted in a manner becoming a bishop during their disputation in Strasbourg: 'He denieth that he made anye contention with me, in thys disputation. But I sawe hym in suche an heat throughe consention, that his verye vaynes in hys hands shooke and trembled (whyche I never saue in all my luye tyme in anie man before) as oft and he herde ought of us that offended and myslyked hym ….' [sig. Giiii vo].

[Back to Top]

David Loades

[Back to Top]

Long it is to recite from the beginning, & few men peruenture woulde beleeue, the brawling matters, the priuie complaints, the contentious quarels, and bitter dissentiōs betwene these two, and especially what despightful contumelies D. Boner receiued at the hands of Winchester. MarginaliaDoct. Boner in the beginning a fauourer of the truth and a Lutherane.For vnderstande (good Reader) that this doctor Boner all this while remained yet (as he seemed) a good man, and was a great furtherer of the kinges proceedings, and a fauourer of Luthers doctrine, and was aduanced only by the Lorde Cromwel. Whose promotions here to reherse: first he was Archdeacon of Leycester, persone of Bledon, of Dereham, Cheswike, and Cheriburton. Then was made Byshop of Hereford, and at last preferred to be Bish. of London. The chiefe of which preferments and dignities were conferred vnto him only by the meanes and fauour of the L. Cromwel, MarginaliaL. Cromwel the onely setter vp of Doct. Boner.who was then his chiefe and only patrone, and setter vp: as the said Boner himselfe in all his letters doth manifestly protest and declare. The Copies of which his letters I could heere produce and exhibite, but for prolonging my story with superfluous matter. Yet that the worlde and all posteritie may see, MarginaliaDoct. Boners cōming vp, was by the Gospell.how the comming vp of D. Boner was onely by the Gospell (howsoeuer he was after vnkind vnto the Gospell) this one letter of his, which I wil heere inferre, written to the Lorde Cromwel out of Fraunce, may stand for a perpetuall testimonie, the tenour whereof here ensueth.

[Back to Top]
A letter of Doctor Boner the kings Ambassadour resident in Fraunce, sent to the Lord Cromwell, declaring the order of his promotions and comming vp.

MarginaliaOut of Boners owne hand writing.MY very singular especiall good Lord, as one most bounden, I most humbly commende mee vnto your honourable good Lordship. And wheras in times passed in hath liked the same, without any my desertes or merites, euen only of your singular exceding goodnes, to bestowe a great deale of loue, beneuolence, and good affection vpon me so poore a man, and of so small qualities, expressing in deede, sondry wayes, the good effectes therof to my great preferment, MarginaliaD Boner cōfesseth himselfe much bound to the L. Crōwell.I was very much bounde thereby vnto youir honourable good Lordshippe, and thought it alway my duetie (as in deede it was) both to beare my true hart againe vnto your Lordship, and also, remembring suche kindnes, to doe vnto the same all such seruice & pleasure as might then lie in my smal power to do.

[Back to Top]

But where of your infinite & inestimable goodnes, it hath further liked you of late, first to aduance me vnto the office of Legation from such a Prince as my soueraigne Lorde is, vnto the Emperour and French king, and next after to procure and obtayne mine aduauncement to so honourable a promotion as the Byshoprike of Hereford: I must here knowledge the exceeding greatnesof your Lordshippes benefite, MarginaliaBoner preferred to the Byshopricke of Hereford, by the L. Cromwel. with mine owne imbecillitie to recompence it, and say (as Virgil writeth) Grates persoluere dignas non opis est nostræ.

[Back to Top]

Surely my good Lorde, I neither am, neither shall be able to requite thus your Lordships moste speciall kindnesse and bountifull goodnes at any time, vnlesse I shoulde vse that ciuile remeady called in law acceptilation, MarginaliaAcceptilation. which great detters especially, are accustomed to procure at the handes of their creditours: whereby yet neuertheles your goodnes the onely doer thereof, shoulde rather be encreased, then my duetie towardes the same, thereby diminished. And cessio Bonorum (the onely extreeme refuge and helpe of poore detters deuised also in * Marginalia* Here seemeth to lack some word, but that I would not alter any thing in his owne copie. ciuile) myghte somewhat help herein, sauing that it is not possible that I shall come Ad tam pinguem fortunam (Wherupon that remedy is grounded) whereby I may recompence and requite this dette worthely.

[Back to Top]

So that in cōclusion there resteth this, that vnlesse your Lordships self do lose me as you haue boūd me, I shal (and that ful gladly) remaine cōtinually your most boundē beadesmen. And Syr I most humbly beseeche your good Lordship, in the honor of God, seeing this thing is begonne, and auaunced onely by your goodnesse and meanes you will to the entent the acte may be wholely your owne, stretche out your goodnesse, not suffering the rest to be perfited otherwise thē by your own hands: wherin as I must & shall knowledge my selfe to be exceedingly beholden vnto your good Lordshippe: so shal the same more esteeme and set by, during my life, hauing so attained it by your onely goodnes: MarginaliaL. Cromwel onely the aduancer of D. Boner, & therfore in an other letter he calleth him his onely Mecenas. And verely, if your good Lordship be not better to me heerein then I can, vnlesse it be of your owne goodnes, desire you, I knowe not howe I shall be able to ouercome the great charges annexed to this promotion. For though my promotions afore, were right honest and good, yea, and suche as one of farre better qualities then I was or am of, ought therewith to haue beene contented, yet considering that of diuers of them, it is to witte, MarginaliaThe promotions of Boner.Leicester, Bledon, Derham, Cheswicke, and Cheryburton, the first fruites, tenthes, and charges borne, I haue not receiued clerely one penie, I am now neuer a whit the more able to beare the great charges of this.

[Back to Top]

I shall therefore herein and in all things els pertaining heereunto, seeing your Lordshippe is so great a patrone, and will nedes binde me for euer to be your owne (as in deede I will) referre all together vnto your goodnesse, beseeching you to take the order and disposition of all into your handes. I cannot tell whether the late Bishop standeth bounden for the first fruits, tenthes, or other dueties, which by stature may be demanded of his successour, but I feare it greatly, and beseeche your Lordship that I may be holpen therein. My charges nowe heere enforceth me the more to speake and trouble your good Lordship, which at the beginninge are not a fewe, and yet not ended. Of my fidelitie to your good I haue of fiue hundreth crownes, remaining fortie, bestowed vpon horses, mule, mulet, raiment, and other necessaries, standing debter to M Thirlby neuertheles, and also to M. Doctour Heynes for one hundreth markes or fast vpon, to them both. And besides this (suche is my chaunce nowe at the beginning) diuers of my seruauntes haue fallen sicke, being in great pearill and daunger, putting me to no little charges.

[Back to Top]

Ouer and besides these displeasures comming vnto me, by not hauing their seruice, and other to keepe them, and also wantinge mine other seruaunts in Englande, which thoughe I haue sent for them, yet neither they, neither my horses or stuff are come I must and doe take patience, trusting it will mende.

[Back to Top]

Vpon the closing vp of this letter and depeache of this bearer, God willing I will packe vp my geare, and to morow betime followe the French kinge, who yesterday departed from Shambour, and maketh haste towardes Paris. And thus our blessed Lord long and wel preserue your good Lordship in health. At Bloyse the 2. of September in the euening.

[Back to Top]

Scribled by the weary hand of him that is
bounden to be and is in dede, your Lord-
ships beadesman & at commaundement.
Edmund Boner.

Diuers other Letters beside this, of Doct. Boner remayne in writyng vpon the like effect and purport, which here also I might adde for a further demōstration hereof: but this one in stede of many, may suffice. Now to our purpose agayne: MarginaliaD. Boner all this while shewed himselfe to be a good man, and a good Gospeller.which is to declare how this Doct. Boneor in the tyme of his first springyng vp, shewed him selfe a good man, & a fast frend to the Gospell of Christ & to the kyngs proceedynges & contrariwise, how Steuen Gardiner did halt then both with God & with the kyng. Also what vnkyndnes and contumelies the sayd Boner receaued at his handes: MarginaliaRancor and hartburning betweene the Bish. of Winchester and Boner.what rancour and harburnyng was betwene them: and what complayntes the one moueth agaynst the other, remaineth cōsequētly by their writyngs & recordes to be opened. For the more euident demonstration whereof, they that haue the letters of þe sayd Doct. Boner written from Fraunce to the kyng, and the Lord Cromwell may right well perceaue. And first to note what a Gospeller

[Back to Top]
he
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield