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Lincoln
 
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Lincoln
NGR: SK 975 715

A city and county of itself, locally in the county of Lincoln, of which it is the chief town. Seat of the Bishopric of Lincoln. 132 miles north by west from London. Lincoln formerly contained 52 parish churches, of which 34 were destroyed prior to the reign of Edward VI. It comprises the parishes of St Benedict, St Botolph, St John Newport, St Margaret in the Close, St Mark, St Martin, St Mary Wigford, St Mary Magdalene, St Michael on the Mount, St Nicholas Newport, St Paul in the Bail, St Peter at Arches, St Peter in eastgate, St Peter at Gowte, and St Swithin; all in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Lincoln. Of which St Mary Magdalene, St Paul in the Bail and St .Peter at Arches are discharged rectories; St Mary Wigford is a discharged vicarage; St John Newport is a vicarage not in charge; and the remainder are perpetual curacies.

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Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

1440 [1416]

Queene Mary. Disputation in the Conuocation house about the reall presence.

MarginaliaAnno 1553.Hesechcius, and vsed the same reason that hee did of the custome of burning of Symboles, and hee asked them what was burnt. Master Watson sayd, we must not enquire nor aske, but if there were any faulte, impute it to Christ. Then sayde M. Cheiney, whereof came those ashes? not of a substance? or can anye substance arise of accidents?

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MarginaliaHarpesfield called in to helpe watson.Then was M. Harpsfield called in to see what he could say in the matter. Who told a faire tale of the omnipotencie of God, and of the imbecilitie and weaknesse of mans reasons not able to attaine to godly things. And he sayde, that it was conuenient whatsoeuer we sawe, felt, or tasted, not to trust out sences. MarginaliaHere is goodly stuffe, as if it were out of the Legendes of lyes.And he tolde a tale out of S. Cyprian, how a woman sawe the Sacrament burning in her cofer, and that which burned there, quoth Harpsfielde, burneth heere, and becōmeth ashes. But what that was that burnt he could not tell. But M. Cheiney continued still, and forced them with this question, what it was that was burnt? It was eyther (sayde he) the substance of breade, or els the substaunce of the body of Christe, which were too much absurditie to graunt. At length they answeared, that it was a miracle, wherat M. Cheiney smiled, and sayd that he could then say no more.

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MarginaliaWeston woulde know whether they were sufficiently answered, when he and his had aunswered no argument.Then D. Weston asked of the company there, whether those menne were sufficiently answeared or no: Certaine Priestes cried Yea, but they were not heard at all: for the great multitude which cried No, no. Which cry was heard and noised almost to the ende of Paules. Whereat D. Weston being much mooued, answered bitterly, that hee asked not the iudgement of the rude multitude & vnlearned people, but of them which were of the house. Then asked he of M. Haddon and his fellowes, whether they woulde aunswere them other three dayes. Haddon, Cheiney, and Elmar, sayd No. MarginaliaM. Philpot.But the Archdeacon of Winchester stoode vp and sayde, that they should not say but they should be aunsweared, and though all other did refuse to answer, yet he would not, but offered to answere them all one after another: wyth whose profer the Prolocutor was not contēted, MarginaliaMarke Westons impudencie.but railed on him, and sayd that he should goe to Bedlem: to whome the Archdeacon soberly made this answer: that he was more worthy to be sent thether, who vsed himselfe so ragingly in that disputation, without any indifferent equalitie. Then rose D. Weston vp, and sayde:

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MarginaliaA strong argument of Weston. Where he is not able to answere he would out face.All the company hath subscribed to our Article, sauing only these men which you see. What their reasons are, you haue heard. We haue answeared them 3. daies, vppon promise (as it pleased him to descāt, wythout truth, for no such promise was made) that they should answer vs againe as long, as the order of disputation doth require, and if they be able to defend theyr doctrine, let them so doe.

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MarginaliaM. Elmers reason why they would not answer.Then M. Elmar stood vp & prooued how vaine a man Weston was, for hee affirmed that they neuer promised to dispute, but only to open & testifye to the worlde their consciences: For whē they were required to subscribe, they refused, and sayd that they would shewe good reasons whych mooued them that they coulde not with their consciences subscribe, as they had partly alreadye done, and were able to doe more sufficiently: therefore (quoth he) it hath bene ill called a disputation, & they were worthy to be blamed that were the authours of that name. For we meant not to dispute, nor now meane not to answer, before our argumēts (quoth he) which we haue to propounde, be soluted, according as it was appoynted: For by answearing we shoulde but incumber our selues, and profit nothing, since the matter is already decreed vppon and determined, what soeuer we shall prooue, or dispute to the contrary.

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The acte of the sixte day.

MarginaliaThe 6. Acte or Session.ON Mondaye following, being the 30. of October, the Prolocutor demaunded of Iohn Philpot Archdeacon of Winchester, whether he would answere in the questions before propounded to their obiections, or no? To whome he made this answeare, that he woulde willingly so doe, if, according to theyr former determination, they would firste aunswere sufficiently to some of hys argumentes, as they had promised to do: wherof he had a dozen, not halfe of the first being yet decided: And if they woulde aunswere fully, and sufficiently but to one of his Arguments, he promised that he would answere all the obiections that they shoulde bryng.

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Then the Prolocutor bade him propounde hys Argument, and it should be resolutely answered by one of them: whereunto M. Morgan was appoynted. MarginaliaPhilpot.Vpon Wensday last (quoth he) I was inforced to silence before I had prosecuted halfe of mine Argument: the summe whereof was this (as was gathered by the iust context of the scripture) that the humain body of Christ was ascended into heauen, and placed on the right hand of God the father: wherefore

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it coulde not be situate vpon earth in the sacrament of the altare, inuisible after the imagination of man. The argument was denied by Morgan: For the profe wherof, Philpot sayd, that this was it wherwith he had to confirme his first argument, if they would haue suffred him þe other day, as now he trusted they would.

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MarginaliaArgument.Fe-
One selfe and same nature (quoth he) receiueth not in
it selfe any thing that is contrary to it selfe.
ri-
But the body of Christ is an humane nature, distincte
from the Deitie, and is a proper nature of it selfe.
o.
Ergo, it cannot receine any thyng that is contrarye to
that nature, and that verieth from it selfe.

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But bodely to be present, and bodely to be absent, to be on earth, and to be in heauen, and al at one present time, be things contrary to the nature of an humaine body. Ergo, it cannot be saide of the humaine body of Christ, that the selfe same body is both in heauen, & also in earth at one instant, either visibly or inuisibly.

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MarginaliaMorgan.Morgan denied the Maior, that is, the firste parte of the argument. The which Philpot vouched out of Vigilius 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, 409, fn 1

"Vigilius" was bishop of Thapsus, and flourished about the year 500, or earlier; his treatise against Eutyches is included in the Bibliotheca Patrum, as in the first Paris collection, vol. v. pp. 567 - 584, where it is incorrectly assigned to Vigilius, bishop of Trent. His works have been published in a collected form by Chifflet; Divione. 1665. The treatise here referred to was published separately, Tiguri, 1539; also Colon. 1575. See Oudin. Comment. de Scrip. Eccles. tom. i. col. 1320; also Walchii Biblioth. Patrum, p. 611, Jenæ, 1834; Rivet's Critici Sacri lib. iv. cap. 28; and Cave's Hist. Litt. - ED.

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an auncient wryter. But Morgan cauilled that it was no scripture, and bade him prooue the same out of scripture. MarginaliaHere is a new euasion inuented by Morgan who dare not plainely deny Vigilius authoritie, but vnder a colour.

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Philpot sayd he could also so do, and right well deduce the same out of S. Paule, who sayeth, that Christ is like vnto vs in all poyntes, except sinne: and therefore like as one of our bodies cannot receiue in it selfe any thing contrarye to the nature of a body, as to be in Paules churche, and at Westminster at one instant, or to be at Londō visibly, & at Lincoln inuisibly at one time: MarginaliaOne body can not be at once in diuers places.for that is so contrary to the nature of a body, and of all creatures (as Didimus and Basilius affirme) that an inuisible creature, as an Angell, cannot be at one time in diuers places, wherfore he concluded, that the body of Christ might not be in moe places then in one, which is in heauen, and so consequently, not to be contained in the sacrament of the altare.

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MarginaliaWeston.To thys the Prolocutor tooke vpon him to answeare, saying, that it was not true that Christe was like vnto vs in all poynts, as Philpot tooke it, except sinne, For þt Christ was not conceiued by the seede of man, as we be.

MarginaliaChrist after his incarnation, was in al poynts like mau, sinne onely except.Whereunto Philpot agained replied, that Christes conception was prophesied before by the Angel to be supernatural, but after he had receiued our nature by the operation of the holy Ghost in the virgins wombe, hee became in all poynts like vnto vs, except sinne.

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MarginaliaMorgan.Then Morgan inferred that thys saying of Paule dyd not plainly proue his purpose. MarginaliaPhilpot.Wel, quoth Philpot, I perceiue that you do answere but by cauillation, yet am I not destitute of other scriptures to confirme my first argumēt, although you refuse the probation of so ancient and catholicke a doctour as Vigilius is. Sainte Peter in the sermone that he made in the thirde of the Actes, making mention of Christe, sayth these woordes: MarginaliaActes. 3.whome heauen must receiue vntill the consummation of all things. &c. Which words are spoken of hys humanitie. If heauen must holde Christ, then can hee not be heere on earth in the Sacrament, as is pretended.

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MarginaliaHarpsfield steppeth in.The Morgan laughing at this, and geuing no direct answer at all, Harpfield stoode vp, being one of the Bishop of Londons chaplaines, and tooke vpon him to answer to the saying of S. Peter, & demaunded of Philpot, whether he would, ex necessitate, that is, of necessitie, force Christ to any place, or no?

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MarginaliaPhilpot.Philpot sayd, that he would no otherwise force Christe of necessity to any place, then he is taught by the wordes of the holy Ghost, which sounde thus: that Christes humaine body must abide in heauen vntill the day of iudgement, as I rehearsed out of the chapter before mentioned.

MarginaliaHarpsfield.Why quoth Harpsfield, do you not knowe that Christe is God omnipotent? Yes, said Philpot, I know that right wel, neither doubt I any thing at all of his omnipotencie. But of Christes omnipotencie what he may do, is not our question, but rather what he doeth. I knowe he may make a stone in the wall a manne, if he liste, and also that he may make moe worldes, but doeth he therefore so? It were no good consequent so to conclude: hee maye doe this, or that, therefore he doth it.

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Ba-
Only so much is to be beleeued of Gods omnipoten-
cie, as is in the woorde expressed.
ra-
That Christes body is both in heauen and heere also
really in the sacrament, is not expressed in the word.
co.
Ergo, it is not to be beleeued that the body of Christe,
being in heauen is heere also really in the sacrament.

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Why quoth the Prolocutor, then you will putte Christ in prisone in heauen. To the which Philpot answered, doe you recken heauen to be a prisone? God graunt vs all to

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