Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Daniel Rogers

(1538? - 1591)

Diplomat and son of John Rogers [DNB]

Daniel found his father's account of his examinations and other writings hidden in his father's cell. 1570, p. 1663; 1576, p. 1419; 1583, p. 1492.

 
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David Woodruff

Sheriff of London (1554 - 1555) (DNB, sub 'Sir William Chester').

Together with fellow sheriff Sir William Chester, David Woodruff escorted John Rogers and John Hooper to and from various prisons during their trials and condemnations. 1563, pp. 1030 and 1056-57; 1570, pp. 1662 and 1679-80; 1576, pp. 1418 and 1433-34; 1583, pp. 1489 and 1507.

After Rogers and Hooper were degraded, they were delivered to the custody of Chester and Woodruff. 1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508.

Chester and Woodruff also conveyed John Rogers to Smithfield. 1563, p. 1076; 1570, p. 1663; 1576, p. 1419; 1583, p. 1492.

Woodruff urged John Rogers, at his execution, to recant his 'abhominable doctrine'. 1570, p. 1664; 1576, pp. 1419-20; 1583, p. 1493.

Together with William Chester, he took custody of Stephen Knight, John Laurence and William Pygot and delivered them to Newgate. 1563, p. 1112; 1570, p. 1721; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543.

Bradford was handed over to the sheriff of London [Chester or Woodruff] and taken to the Clink. He was then taken to the Counter in the Poultry, and it was intended that he be handed to the earl of Derby and burned in Manchester, but these original plans were altered and he was burned in London. 1563, p. 1199, 1570, pp. 1789-90, 1576, p. 1528,1583, p. 1611.

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Woodruff taunted Bradford at his burning and ordered Bradford's hands to be tied when he would not cease praying. 1563, p. 1215, 1570, p. 1804 [with cross-ref to p. 1664], 1576, p. 1540, 1583, p. 1624.

He called John Rogers a heretic at his burning and said that he would never pray for him, although Rogers prayed for the sheriff. 1563, p. 1215, 1576, p. 1540, 1583, p. 1624.

In 1555 he was sheriff with William Chester. Chester would weep at the death of the martyrs, whereas Woodruff would laugh. Chester was kind, whereas Woodruff would beat the condemned. 1563, p. 1215, 1570, p. 1804, 1576, p. 1540, 1583, p. 1624.

When Woodruff went home after the burning of John Bradford, he became paralysed in his legs and arms. 1563, p. 1215, 1570, pp. 1804-05, 1576, p. 1540, 1583, p. 1624.

Denley, Newman and Packingham were handed over to the sheriffs of London to be kept until commanded by writ to be sent to their places of execution. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1685.

Along with Bonner, Woodruff cried for Robert Smith to be taken away at his last examination. 1563, p. 1259, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, p. 1605, 1583, p. 1694.

David Woodruff insisted that Carman's head be broken for getting his cart in the way when Woodruff's children were being brought to him. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

Woodruff was afflicted with a deadening of one side, which stayed with him for seven or eight years until he died. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

[For further evidence of Woodruff's catholic sympathies, see Brigden, London, p. 554].

[Foxe also refers to him by the variants: 'Woodriff', 'Woodrofe', 'Wodroffe' and 'Wodriffe'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Day

(1522 - 1584)

Printer. Of London. [See Elizabeth Evenden, 'Patents and Patronage: The Life and Career of John Day, Tudor Printer', (unpublished PhD thesis, York University, 2002).]

John Day was imprisoned in Mary's reign for religion. John Rogers predicted to Day, when they were both in prison, that the gospel would be restored to England. 1563, p. 1037; 1570, p. 1663; 1576, p. 1419; 1583, p. 1492.

William Cooke was sent to prison for persuading John Day to print Gardiner's De Vera Obedientia. 1563, p. 1681.

Drainer went to see the printer John Day and verbally attacked him for his portrayal in Foxe's work. Day derided him by calling him Justice Nine Holes and saying that he knew that Drainer had denied his real reason for drilling the holes. Drainer was alleged to have claimed in Cheapside to have drilled the holes to look on women. Drainer denied drilling all the holes and said that the parson drilled some also. . 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 2002, 1583, p. 2113.

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John Peter said on many occasions that if things were not true God should let him rot. He died of a disease that caused his body to rot. John Day the printer was witness to this. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Mrs Alexander Andrew

Wife of the Keeper of Newgate prison

She woke John Rogers on the morning of his execution. 1563, p. 1036; 1570, p. 1663; 1576, p. 1419; 1583, p. 1492.

 
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William Chester

(1509? - 1595?)

Draper. Lord mayor, alderman and merchant of London. (DNB)

Sheriff with David Woodruff in 1555.

Together with his fellow sheriff David Woodruff, Chester escorted John Rogers and John Hooper to and from various prisons during the process of their trials and condemnations. 1563, pp. 1030 and 1056-57; 1570, pp. 1662 and 1679-80; 1576, p. 1418 and 1433-34; 1583, pp. 1489 and 1507. After Hooper and Rogers were degraded they were delivered to the custody of Chester and Woodruff. 1563, p. 1058; 1570, p.1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508. He and Woodruff also conveyed John Rogers to Smithfield. 1563, p. 1036; 1570, p. 1663; 1576, p. 1419; 1583, p. 1492.

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Chester escorted Rowland Taylor out of London on the first leg of Taylor's journey to Hadleigh for execution. Chester gave Taylor permission to speak with his wife and daughters and wept as Taylor said farewell to them. He 'gently' refused to let Taylor's wife speak further with her husband while Taylor was being detained in an inn, awaiting the arrival of the sheriff of Essex. Chester provided Margaret Taylor with an escort to her mother's house. 1563, p. 1076; 1570, p. 1700; 1576, pp. 1451-52; 1583, p. 1525.

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Together with David Woodruff, he took custody of Stephen Knight, John Laurence and William Pygot and delivered them to Newgate. 1563, p. 1112; 1570, p. 1721; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1543.

On 30 May 1555, John Cardmaker and John Warne were committed to Chester and Woodruff's custody for execution. At the stake, Chester and Woodruff called Cardmaker aside and talked with him secretly for a long time. 1563, p. 1142; 1570, p. 1751; 1576, pp. 1496-97; 1583, p. 1579.

Bradford was handed over to the sheriff of London [Chester or Woodruff] and taken to the Clink. He was then taken to the Counter in the Poultry, and it was intended that he be handed to the earl of Derby and burned in Manchester, but these original plans are altered and he was burned in London. 1563, p. 1199, 1570, pp. 1789-90, 1576, p. 1528,1583, p. 1611.

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Chester would weep at the death of the martyrs, whereas Woodruff would laugh. Chester was kind, whereas Woodruff would beat the condemned. 1563, p. 1215, 1570, p. 1804, 1576, p. 1540, 1583, p. 1624.

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked Bernher to ask Mrs Pierrpoint to ask Sheriff Chester what was planned for him. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1654.

Denley, Newman and Packingham were handed over to the sheriffs of London to be kept until commanded by writ to be sent to their places of execution. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1685.

William Chester was persecuted during Mary's reign for his protestant beliefs. 1563, p. 1737.

1516 [1492]

Queene Mary. The sayinges and Propheticall forewarninges of M. Rogers Martyr.

MarginaliaAnn. 1554. February.If God looke not mercifully  

Commentary  *  Close

These two paragraphs are the only portions of Rogers's two points which are printed in the 1570 and 1576 editions. These paragraphs are printed twice in the 1583 edition because Foxe simply reinserted the text of the two points, from the 1563 edition, into the version of Roger's martyrdom printed in the 1570 and 1576 editions. When he did this, he neglected to remove the redundant paragraphs which had formed an abstract of the points in the second and third editions, from the 1583edition.

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vpon England, the seedes of vtter destruction are sowen in it already, by these hypocriticall Tyrauntes, and Antichristian Prelates Popishe Papistes, and double Traytours to theyr naturall Countrey. And yet they speake of mercy, of blessing of the Catholicke Church, of vnitie, of power and strengthening of the Realme. This double dissimulation will shew it selfe one day when the plague commeth, which will vndoubtedly light vpon these crowneshorne capteines, and that shortly, whatsoeuer the godly and the poore Realme suffer in the meane while by Gods good sufferaunce and will.

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Spite of Nabuchodonosors beard, and maugre his heart, the captiue, thrall and miserable Iewes must come home agayne, and haue their Citie and temple builded vp agayne by Zorobabell, Esdras, and Nehemias, &c. And the whole Kingdome of Babylon must go to ruine, and be taken in of straunges, the Persians and the Medes. So shall the disperpled English flocke of Christ be brought againe into theyr former estate, or to a better I trust in the Lorde God, than it was in innocent Kyng Edwardes dayes, and our bloudy Babylonicall Byshops, and the whole crowneshorne companye brought to vtter shame, rebuke, ruyne, decaye, and destruction: for God can not, and vndoubtedly wyll not suffer for euer theyr abhominable lying false doctrine, theyr hypocrisie, bloudthrist, whoredome, idlenesse, theyr pestilent lyfe pampored in all kynde of pleasure, theyr thrasonicall boasting, pryde, theyr malicious, enuious, and poysoned stomackes, which they beare towardes hys poore and miserable Christians. Peter truely warneth, that if iudgemente begynneth at the house of God, what shall be the ende of them that beleeue not the Gospell? If the righteous shall scant be saued, where shall the vngodly and sinfull appeare? Some shall haue theyr punishmente heere in thys worlde, and in the worlde to come, and they that doo escape in thys worlde, shall not escape euerlastyng damnation. Thys shall bee youre sauce, O yee wicked papistes, make yee merry heere as long as yee may.

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MarginaliaFebr. 4. 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 609, middle

The following notice is taken of Rogers' martyrdom by the French ambassador, Noailles, a zealous papist: "This day was performed la confirmation de l'alliance between the pope and this kingdom, by a public and solemn sacrifice of a preaching doctor named Rogerus, who has been burnt alive for being a Lutheran; but he died persisting in his opinion. At this conduct the greatest part of the people took such pleasure, that they were not afraid to make him many acclamations to strengthen his courage. Even his children assisted at it, comforting him in such a manner, that it seemed as if he had been led to a wedding." (Noailles' Lett. Feb. 4, 1555.)

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After that I. Rogers (as yee haue heard) had bene long & straitly imprisoned, lodged in newgate amōgst theeues, oftē examined: and very vncharitably intreated & at lēgth vniustly and most cruelly by wicked Winchester cōdemned the 4. of February, in the yeare of our Lord 1555. beeyng Monday in the morning, MarginaliaM. Rogers warned to prepare to death.hee was warned sodenly by the kepers wife of newgate, to prepare himself to the fire: who then being found a slepe, scarse with much shogging could be awaked. At length being raysed and waked, and byd to make haste, then, saide he, if it be so, I neede not to tye my poyntes: and so was had downe, MarginaliaM. Rogers disgraded.first to Boner to bee disgraded. That done, hee craued of Boner but one petition. Boner asking what that should be: nothing sayde he: but that he might talke a few words with his wife, before his burning. MarginaliaM. Rogers could not be suffered of Boner to speake to his wife before his burning. But that coulde not bee obteined of hym. Then said he, you declare your charitie, what it is: MarginaliaM. Rogers brought to Smithfield. and so he was brought into Smithfield by Maister Chester, and Maister Woodrofe, then Shirrifes of London, there to bee burnt, where he shewed most constant paciencie, not vsing many wordes, for he could not be permitted,  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 609, line 14 from the bottom

A common practice; see Hooper's case, and Taylor's, with Foxe's remarks there.

but onely exhorting the people constantly to remaine in that faith and true doctrine which he before had taught and they had learned, and for the confirmation whereof he was not only content paciently to suffer and beare all such bitternes and cruelty as had bene shewed him, but also most gladly to resigne vp his life, and to geue his flesh to the consuming fire for the testimonie of the same.

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Briefly and in few wordes to comprehend the whole order of his lyfe, doynges, and Martyrdome, first this godly M. Rogers was committed to prison (as is abouesayd) & there continued a yeare and halfe.  

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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 609, line 5 from the bottom

The edition of 1563, p. 1036, here says: "This Rogers was first committed to pryson An. 1553, in the moneth of August, and there continued a xii. moneth and a halfe."

In prison he was mery, and earnest in all he went about. He wrote much: his examinations he penned with his owne hand, which else had neuer come to light. MarginaliaThe copie of M. Rogers examination by gods prouidence preserued.Wherein is to be noted by the way a memorable working of Gods prouidence. 
Commentary  *  Close

This story of how Rogers's writings were discovered first appears in the 1570 edition. Daniel Rogers himself may have been Foxe's source for this story; he was on very friendly terms with the martyrologist when he was an adult (see Bl, Harley 417, fos. 104r and 117r).

Ye heard a litle aboue how M. Rogers craued of Boner, going to hys burning, þt he might speake a few wordes before with hys wife, whiche coulde not be graunted. What these wordes were which he had to say to his wife, it is for no man certeinly to define. Likely it may be supposed that his purpose was, amongst other things, to signifie vnto her of the booke written of his examinations and aunsweres whych he had priuily hid in a secret corner of the prison where he lay. But where mans power lacketh, see how Gods prouidence worketh. For nothwithstanding þt during the tyme of his imprisonment, straite search there was to take away his letters and writings: yet after his death, his wyfe and one of her sonnes called Daniell, cōming into þe place wher he lay, to seeke for his bookes and writings, and now rea-

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dy to go away, it chaunced her sonne aforenamed, casting his eye aside to spy a blacke thing (for it had a blacke couer belike because it shuld not be known) lying in a blind corner vnder a payre of stayres. Who willing his mother to see what it was, found it to be the booke written with his own hand, contayning these his examinatiōs & answers with other matter aboue specified. In the latter end where of this also was conteyned, which because it concerneth a Propheticall forewarning of thinges pertayning to the Church I thought to place the same his woordes, as they be there written, which are these. If God looke not mercifully vppon Englande, the seedes of vtter destruction are sowne in it already, by these hipocritical tyrauntes, & Antichristian Prelates, Popish Papists, and double traytors to their naturall country. And yet they speake of mercy, of blessing, of the Catholicke Churche, of vnitie, of power, & strengthning of the realm. MarginaliaM. Rogers seemeth to prophesie here of England, and that truely.This double dissimulation will shewe it selfe one daye when the plague commeth, whiche will vndoubtedly light vppon these crowneshorne Captaines, and that shortly, whatsoeuer the godly and þe poore realme suffer in the meane while by Gods sufferaunce and will.

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Spite of Nabuchodonozers beard, and maugre hys hart, þe captiue, thral & miserable Iewes must come home agayne, and haue their Citie and temple builded vp again by Zorobabell Esdras, & Nehemias, &c. And the whole kingdome of Babilon must goe to ruine and be taken of straungers, the Persians and Medes. MarginaliaHe meaneth here of the returne of the exiles into England.So shal þe disperckled english flock of Christ be brought agayn into their former estate, or to a better I trust in the Lorde God, then it was in innocent king Edwardes dayes, and our bloudye Babilonicall Bishops, and the whole crowneshorn company, brought to utter shame: rebuke, ruine, decay and destruction, for God cannot and vndoubtedly will not suffer for euer theyr abhominable lying, false doctrine, their hipocrisie, bloudthirst, whoredome, idlenes, their pestilent life pampred in all kinde of pleasure: their thrasonicall boasting, pride, their malicious, enuious, and poysoned stomackes which they beare towardes his poore and miserable Christians. Peter truely warneth that if iudgement beginneth in the house of God, what shal be the end of them that beleeue not the Gospell? If the righteous shall scant bee saued, where shall the vngodly and sinfull appeare? Marginalia1. Pet. 4.Some shall haue their punishment here in this world and in the worlde to come, and they that doe escape in this worlde, shall not escape euerlasting damnation. This shall be your sauce O ye wicked Papistes, make yee merye here as long as ye may.

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Furthermore, amongest other his wordes & sayinges, which may seeme prophetically to be spoken of hym, thys also may be added, and is notoriously to be marked, that he spake being then in prison, to the Printer of this presente booke,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VI, 610, fn 2

John Daye, who may be called the printer of the English Reformation. In the reign of Edward VI. he printed many writings of the Reformers.

who then also was laid vp for like cause of religion: MarginaliaM. Rogers prophesieth of the returne of the Gospell.Thou (sayd he) shalt liue to see the alteration of this religiō and the gospell to be freely preached againe: And therefore haue me commended to my brethren, as well in exile as others, and bid them be circumspect in displacing the Papists, & putting good ministers into churches, or els their ende will be worse then ours. MarginaliaM. Rogers coūsell in placing good ministers. And for lacke of good ministers to furnish churches, his deuise was (M. Hooper also agreeing to the same) that for euery x. Churches, some one good and learned superintendent shuld be appointed, which should haue vnder him faythfull Readers, suche as might well be got, so that popish Priests shoulde cleane be put out, and the bishop once a yeare to ouersee the profiting of the Parishes, and if the minister did not his dutye, as well in profiting himselfe in his book, and his Parishioners in good instructions, so that they may be trayned by little & litle to geue a reckoning how they do profite, thē he to be expelled, and an other put in is place. And the Byshop to do the like with the superintendent, this was hys counsell and request. Shewing moreouer, and protestyng in his commendations to hys brethren by the Printer aforesayd, that if they woulde not so doe, their ende he sayde would be worse then theirs.

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MarginaliaA note touching Priestes cappes.Ouer and besides diuers other thinges touching M. Rogers, 

Commentary  *  Close

This anecdote first appears in the appendix to the 1563 edition, which means that Foxe learned of it while that edition was being printed.

this is not to be fogottē, how in the dayes of K. Edward the sixt, there was a controuersie among the Bishops and clergye, for wearing of priestes caps, and other attire belonging to that order. M. Rogers beyng one of þt number which neuer went otherwise then in a round cap, during all the time of K. Edward, affirmed that he would not agree to that decreement of vniformitie, but vpō this condition, that if they would needes haue such an vniformitie of wearing the cap, tippet, &c. then it shoulde also be decreed with all that the Papistes for a difference betwixt them and other, shuld be constrayned to weare vpon their sleeues a Chalice with an host vpon it. Whereunto if they

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would
RRRr.iiij.
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