Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anna Hooper

(d. Dec. 1555)

Wife of John Hooper; born Anna de Tilley, but Anna de Tserelas when she married Hooper [Garrett, Marian Exiles sub 'Hooper, Daniel'].

Anna Hooper is described by Foxe as a 'Burgonian' (presumably a native of Bruges) and (in 1563) 'of great parentage'. Foxe also states that Hooper married her in Zurich. 1563, pp. 1049-50; 1570, p. 1675; 1576, p. 1429; 1583, p. 1503. [Actually Anna Hooper was from Antwerp and married John Hooper in Basel.]

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Bullinger reported to Hooper, in a letter of 10 October 1554, that Hooper's wife and son were in Frankfurt. 1570, p. 1693; 1576, p. 1445; 1583, p. 1518.

In a letter dated 21 January 1555, John Hooper complained that his letters had not been delivered to his wife. 1563, p. 1063; 1570, p. 1685; 1576, p. 1438; 1583, p. 1511.

John Hooper sent her a long letter of consolation dated 13 October 1555. 1570, pp. 1687-90; 1576, pp. 1440-42; 1583, pp. 1513-16.

 
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Heinrich Bullinger

(1504 - 1575)

Swiss reformer and theologian [Antistes of Zurich (Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation, ed. Hans J. Hillerbrand (4 vols., Oxford, 1996))].

A 'singuler frend' to John Hooper during Hooper's sojourn in Zurich; Bullinger and Hooper said warm farewells to each other when Hooper returned to England. 1570, p. 1675; 1576, pp. 1429-30; 1583, p. 1503.

He sent a letter to Hooper, dated 10 October 1554, deploring the Marian persecution and encouraging Hooper to remain steadfast. 1570, pp. 1692-93; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

 
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Sir William St Loe

(1518? - 1565?)

MP for Somerset (1559), Derbyshire (1563). Keeper of the horse to Edward VI (1553). Gentleman attendant to princess Elizabeth; captain of the guard by 1558; chief butler, England and Wales (1559); JP Somerset (from 1559), Derbyshire (from 1561). (Hasler)

St Loe employed John Hooper briefly, c 1539. 1570, p. 1675; 1576, p. 1429; 1583, p. 1503.

One of Elizabeth's gentlemen, he was committed to Queen Mary's Master of the Horse as a prisoner (1570, p. 1638; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1468).

He was released from the Tower on 18 January 1555 (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1482).

[Foxe does not say so, but St Loe had been arrested and eventually sent to the Tower accused of being the link between Elizabeth and Wyatt (Hasler, Commons)].

Sir William St Loe was called before the privy council at around the same time as Elizabeth was imprisoned in the Tower. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

[Also referred to as 'Sir William Sentlow']

1527 [1503]

Queene Mary. The lyfe and story of M. Hooper Martyr.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. February.dels request, he sent home his seruaunt agayne, right well commending his learning and wit,but yet bearing in his brest a grudging stomacke agaynst Mayster Hooper still.

It followed not long after this (as malice is alwayes working mischife) that intelligence was geuen to master Hooper to prouide for himselfe, for daunger that was working agaynst him. Whereupon MarginaliaM. Hooper forced to auoyd the house of Syr Thomas Arundel.M. Hooper leauing M. Arundels house, and borowing an horse of a certayne friend (whose life he had saued a little before from the gallowes) tooke his iourney to the Sea side, MarginaliaM. Hooper flyeth agayne out of England.to goe to Fraunce, sending backe the horse agayne by one, which in deede did not deliuer him to the owner. M. Hoper being at Paris taried there not long, but in short time returned into England agayne, & was retayned of M. Sentlow, till the tyme that he was agayne molested and laid for: whereby he was cōpelled (vnder the pretence of being Captayne of a ship going to Ireland) to take the Seas, 

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This second flight from England can be dated to around 1544 (Newcombe, p. 26).

and so escaped he (although not without extreme perill of drowning) through Fraunce, to the higher partes of Germany. Where he entring acquaintance with the learned men, was of thē frēdly and louingly enterteined, both at Basil, and especially at Zuricke of MarginaliaGreat frendship betweene M. Bullinger and M. Hooper.Mayster Bullinger, being his singuler frend. Where also he maryed his wife, which was a Burgonian, 
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Apparently Foxe means by this that she was from Bruges, or that she was Burgundian. (The Low Countries were part of the old Duchy of Burgundy). Anna Hooper was from Antwerp.

and applied very studiously the Hebrue toung.  
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Hooper returned to England in 1546 to obtain funds; he was back in Switzerland by the end of that year (Newcombe, pp. 31-36).

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At length when God saw it good to stay the bloudy time of the 6. Articles, and to geue vs king Edward to raygne ouer this Realme, with some peace and rest vnto the gospel, amongest many other English exiles, which thē repared homeward, M. Hooper also, moued in cōsciēce, thought not to absent himselfe, seing such a time and occasion offered to helpe forward the Lords worke, to the vttermost of his ability. And so comming to M. Bullinger, and other of his acquayntance in Zuricke (as duty required) to geue them thankes for their singuler kindnes and humanity toward him manifolde wayes declared, with like humanity agayne purposed to take his leaue of thē at his departing, & so did. 

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Hooper left for England in 1549 (see OL, I, pp. 48-49).

Vnto whom M. Bullinger agayne (who had alwayes a speciall fauor to M. Hooper) spake on thys wyse: MarginaliaM. Bullingers wordes to M. Hooper at his departing from Zurick.M. Hooper (sayde he) although we are sory to parte wyth your company for our own cause, yet much greater causes we haue to reioice, both for your sake, and especially for the cause of Christes true religion, that you shall now returne out of long banishment vnto your natiue country agayn, where not onely you may enioy your own priuate liberty but also the cause and state of Christes Church by you may fare the better as we doubt not but it shall.

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An other cause moreouer why we reioyce with you & for you, is this, that you shall remoue not only out of exile, into liberty: but you shall leaue here a baren, a sower, & an vnpleasant country, rude & sauage, and shal go into a land flowing with milke and hony, replenished wt al pleasure & fertility. Notwithstanding wt this our reioycing, one feare and care we haue, least you being absent, and so far distant from vs, or els comming to such aboundance of wealth & felicity, in your new welfare, and plenty of al thinges, and in your florishing honors, where ye shall come peraduenture to be a Bishop, and where ye shall finde so many new frends, you wil forget vs your old acquaintance & welwillers. Neuertheles howsoeuer you shall forget & shake vs of yet this perswade your selfe, þt we will not fogette our old frend & felow M. Hooper. And if you shal please not to forget vs agayne, then I pray you let vs heare from you.

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MarginaliaThe aunswere of M Hooper to M. Bullinger.Whereunto M. Hooper aunswering agayne, first gaue to M. Bullinger and the rest right harty thankes, for that their singuler good will, and vndeserued affection, appearing not onely now, but at all times towardes him: declaring moreouer that as the principal cause of his remouing to his countrey was the matter of Religion: so touching the vnpleasantnes and barrennes of that coūtry of theirs, there was no cause therein, why he could not finde in his hart to continue his life there, as soone as in any place in the world, and rather then in his owne natiue country, if there were nothing els in his cōscience that moued hym so to do. And as touching the forgetting of his olde frendes, although (sayd he) the remembraunce of a mans countrey naturally doth delight him, neither could he deny, but god had blessed his country of England with many great commodities: yet neither the nature of the country nor pleasure of commodities, nor newnesse of frends should ouer induce him to the obliuion of such frendes and benefactors, whō he was so intirely bound vnto: & therfore you shall be sure (sayde he) from time to time to heare from me, and I wyll write vnto you as it goeth with me. But the last newes of al I shal not be able to write: for there (sayd he) taking M. Bullinger by the hand) where I shall take most paynes, MarginaliaM. Hooper prophesyeth of himselfe.there shall you heare of me to be burned to ashes: and that shalbe the last newes which I shal not be able to write vnto you, but you shall heare it of me. &c. 

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With a young, protestant, and apparently healthy Edward VI having just ascended the throne, this would have been a remarkable prophecy, if Hooper actually made it.

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To this also may be added an other like prophetical demonstration, forshewing before the maner of his Martyrdome wherewith he should glorify God, which was this. When M. Hooper being made Bishop of Worcester and Glocester should haue his armes giuē him by the Herold, as the maner is here in Englād, euery Bishop to haue his armes assigned vnto him: (whether by the appoynment of M. Hoper, or by þe Herold I haue not certainly to say) but the armes which were to him allotted was this: MarginaliaA note of M. Hoopers armes presignifying his Martyrdome.a Lambe in a fiery bush, and the sunne beames from heauen descending downe vpon the Lambe, rightly denoting (as it seemed) the order of his suffering, which afterward folowed.

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But now to the purpose of our storey againe: Thus whē M. Hooper had taken his farewell of M. Bullinger and his frends in Zurick, MarginaliaM. Hooper returneth agayne into England.he made his repayre agayn into England in the raigne of K. Edward 6. where he comming to London vsed continually to preach, most tymes twyse, at least once euery day, and neuer fayled. 

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This is confirmed in letters to Bullinger from Anna Hooper and from Micron (OL, I, pp. 108 and 557). An interesting passage in the Rerum, which was never reprinted, states that at first Hooper did not preach because the bishops refused to grant him a licence due to his opposition to vestments, but that he received permission to preach from the duke of Somerset (Rerum, p. 279).

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MarginaliaThe notable diligēce of M. Hooper in preaching.In his Sermons, according to his accustomed maner, he corrected sinne, and sharply inueyed agaynst the iniquity of the world, and corrupt abuses of the Churche. The people in great flocks and companies, daily came to heare his voyce, as the most melodious sounde and tune of Orpheus harpe, as the Prouerbe sayth: Insomuch that often times, when he was preaching, the Church shoulde be so ful, that none could enter further then the dores therof. In his doctrine he was earnest, in tong eloquent, in the scriptures perfect, in paynes indefatigable.

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Moreouer, besides other his giftes and qualities, this is in him to be maruelled, that euen as he began so he cōtinued still vnto his liues end. MarginaliaThe singuler vertues of M. Hooper described.For neither could his labour and payne taking breake him, niether promotion chaunge him, neither daynty fare corrupt him. His life was so pure and good, that no kinde of sclaūder (although diuers went about to reproue it) could fastē any fault vpō him. He was of body strong, his health whole & soūd, his wit very pregnant, his inuincible pacience able to sustein whatsoeuer sinister fortune and aduersity could doe. He was constant of iudgement, a good Iusticer, spare of dyet, sparer of words, & sparest of time. In housekeping very liberall, and sometime more free then his liuing would extend vnto. Briefly, of all those vertues and qualities required of S. Paul in a good B. in his epistle to Timothe, I know not one in this good B. lacking. He bare in countenaūce & talke alwayes a certayn seuere & graue grace, which might peraduenture be wished sometimes to haue bene a little more populare and vulgarlike in him: but he knew what he had to doe best himselfe.

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This by the way I thought to note, for that there was once an honest Citizen, & to me not vnknowne, which hauing in himselfe a certaine cōflict  

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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Addenda: ref page 639, line 17

The edition of 1563 (p. 1050) presents a variation which may be worth noting; "For I myselfe have been oftentymes present when he preaching," &c. {Cattley/Pratt notes that the 1563 edition reads 'grudge' for 'conflict'.}

of conscience, came to his doore for coūsell: but being abashed at his austere behauior  
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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Addenda: ref page 639, line 17

{Cattley/Pratt notes that the 1563 edition reads 'look' for 'behaviour'.}

durst not come in, but departed, seking remedy of his trobled minde at other mens hands, which he afterward by þe help of almighty God did finde & obtayn. Therefore in my iudgement, MarginaliaDiscretion how ministers and preachers ought to behaue themselues.such as are appointed & made gouernours ouer þe flock of Christ, to teach and instruct them, ought so to frame their life, maners, countenaunce and externall behauiour, as neither they shew themselues to familiar & light whereby to be brought in contempt, nor in the other side a gayn, that they appere more lofty and rigorous,  
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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Addenda: ref page 639, line 17

{Cattley/Pratt notes that the 1563 edition reads 'austere' for 'rigorous'.}

then appertayneth to the edifiyng of the simple flocke of Christ. Neuertheles, as euery mā hath his peculiar gift wrought in him by nature, so this disposition of fatherly grauitie in this man neither was excessiue, neither did hee beare that personage which was in him without great consideratiō. For it seemed to him peraduenture, that this licencious and vnbrideled life of the common sorte, ought to be chastened, not onely with wordes and discipline, but also with the graue and seuere countenaunce of good men.

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MarginaliaM. Hooper made Bishop of Glocester and Worcester.After he had thus practised himself in this popular and common kinde of preaching: at length, and that not wythout the great profite of many, he was called to preache before the kinges maiestie, and soone after, made Bishop of Gloucester by the kinges commaundement.  

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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 640, line 9

Hooper was nominated to the see of Gloucester May 15th, 1550, but not consecrated till March 8th, 1551; he was put in commendam of the see of Worcester on the death of Heath in April 1552.

In that office he continued two yeares, and behaued himself so wel, that his very enemies (except it were for his good doings, and sharpe correcting of sinne) could finde no fault with hym: and after that he was made Bishop of Worcester.

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But I cannot tell what  

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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Addenda: ref page 640, line 14

A somewhat over-literal translation of "nescio quæ."

sinister & vnlucky contention concerning the ordering and consecration of Bishops, and of their apparell, with suche other like trifles, began to disturbe þe good & lucky beginning of this godly byshop. For notwithstanding that godly reformation of religion then begon in the church of England, besides other ceremonies more ambitious then profitable or tending to edification, they vsed to weare suche garmentes and apparrell as the popish Bishops were wont to doe: 
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Cattley/Pratt, VI, Appendix: ref page 640, line 20

This is unfair in Foxe. The old popish vestments, the amess, able, surcingle, maniple, stole, and chasuble, were disused at the Reformation; and no garments were consecrated. But Foxe had a predilection for that Puritanical party of which Rogers and Hooper were leaders. Hooper, however, lived to repent of his violence in the matter; and Foxe himself admits in next page, that both parties "contended about it more than reason would." See an important note on Hooper's change of views about the habits, in Dr. Wordsworth's Eccles. Biog. ii. p. 365; also various letters among the Zurich Letters, printed by the Parker Society, 1846.

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MarginaliaPopish attyre.first a Chymere, & vn-

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