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Áedán (Aidan) (St Aidan)

(d. 651) [ODNB]

Irish monk of Iona; missionary to Northumbria and bishop of Lindisfarne

Requested by King Oswald of Northumbria; worked with him and Oswine

He preached in Northumbria, with King Oswald translating into English. 1570, pp. 150, 163; 1576, pp. 112, 123; 1583, pp. 111, 122.

Áedán was given a valuable horse by King Oswine of Deira so that he would not always have to travel on foot. He met a poor beggar one day and gave him the horse with its trappings. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 122.

Áedán allowed only milk and water to be drunk at Lindisfarne. 1570, p. 170; 1576, p. 129; 1583, p. 127.

Ádán, Finán and his successor Colmán held to the Irish method of calculating the date of Easter. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 122.

 
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Ælfflæd (St Ælfflæd, Elfleda)

(654 - 714) [ODNB]

Daughter of King Oswiu of Northumbria; abbess of Strensall-Whitby.

Dedicated to religion at one year old in fulfillment of a vow made by her father before his victory at the battle of the Winw?d; in the care of her relative Hild, succeeded her as abbess.

King Oswiu gave with his daughter 12 lordships to found 12 monasteries, six each in Bernicia and Deira. 1570, pp. 150, 177; 1576, pp. 112, 134; 1583, pp. 111, 133.

 
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Æthelbald of Mercia

(d. 757) [ODNB]

King of the Mercians (716 - 57)

In exile under cousin Coelred; formed a close relationship with the hermit Guthlac. As king, he was dominant south of the Humber; murdered by his bodyguards.

Æthelbald attended the synod in 747 called by archbishop Cuthbert. 1570, p. 171; 1576, p. 129; 1583, p. 128.

Æthelbald received a letter from Boniface, archbishop of Mainz, admonishing him for his sinful life and oppression of churches. 1570, p. 171; 1576, p. 129; 1583, p. 128.

Æthelbald decreed that churches should be freed from all public charges. Bede died during his reign. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

Æthelbald founded Peterborough Abbey. 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

Æthelbald, after King Ceolwulf retired to a monastery, invaded and despoiled Northumbria. With other Saxon kings, he so dominated the Britons that they no longer attacked. Æthelbald placed heavy exactions upon Cuthred, King of the West Saxons. Eventually Cuthred attacked Æthelbald, and after a protracted war, defeated him. The next year Æthelbald attacked again and was killed. 1570, p. 171; 1576, p. 129; 1583, p. 128.

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Æthelberht (Edilbert) I of Kent

(d. 616?) [ODNB]

King of Kent. Baptised by Augustine; compiled written law code.

Æthelberht subdued the other Saxon kings, except for the king of Northumbria. 1570, p. 149; 1576, p. 111; 1583, p. 110.

Æthelberht married his wife Bertha on condition, imposed by her parents, that she be allowed to practice her Christian faith. 1570, p. 156; 1576, p. 117; 1583, p. 116.

Augustine met King Æthelbert of Kent and was given permission to live and preach in his kingdom. He and the other missionaries were given a house in Canterbury. The king was converted and built a church and an abbey for Augustine in Canterbury. 1570, 156; 1576, p. 117;1583, p. 116.

Pope Gregory sent a letter to Æthelberht. 1570, 159; 1576, p. 119;1583, p. 118.

Æthelberht was overlord of all the Saxon kings south of the Humber. 1570, p. 161; 1576, p. 121; 1583, p. 120.

Æthelberht, with Sæberht of the East Saxons, built the church of St Paul's in London. They translated the archbishop's see to Canterbury. Æthelberht built other churches in Rochester and Westminster. 1570, pp. 149, 161, 177; 1576, pp. 111, 121, 134; 1583, pp. 110, 120, 133.

He is mentioned in 1563, p. 16.

 
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Æthelburh

(d. 647) [ODNB sub Eadwine]

Kentish princess; 2nd wife of Eadwine, king of Northumbria. Christian; recipient of letters from Pope Boniface V

Æthelburh gave birth to her daughter Eanflæd on the day her husband was seriously wounded. Eadwine promised to convert to Christianity if he was victorious over the West Saxons. In token of this, he had his daughter baptised by Bishop Paulinus. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

Æthelburh and Bishop Paulinus converted Eadwine to Christianity. 1570, p. 154; 1576, p. 115; 1583, p. 114.

After the death of King Eadwine, and the conquest by Cadwallon of Gwynedd and Penda of Mercia, the subsequent disorder forced Paulinus to flee into Kent, along with Queen Æthelburh and her daughter Eanflæd. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

 
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Æthelred of Mercia

(d. after 704) [ODNB]

King of the Mercians (c. 674 - 704)

Son of Penda; succeeded brother Wulfhere. Abdicated in favour of his nephew, then became abbot of Bardney.

His sisters were Cyneburh and Cyneswith, who are referred to as holy virgins. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

Æthelred was a patron of Bardney Abbey. 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

Æthelred abdicated to become a monk, and then became abbot of Bardney. 1570, p. 168; 1576, p. 126; 1583, p. 125.

 
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Æthelthryth (St Etheldreda, Audrey)

(d. 679) [ODNB]

Queen of Northumbria (670 - before 678); abbess of Ely (673 - 679)

Daughter of Anna, king of East Anglia; married Tondberht, then Ecgfrith, king of Northumbria in 670. Friend of Cuthbert and Wilfred; consecrated nun in 672; founded double monastery at Ely in 673; divorced by 678.

Etheldreda refused her husband Ecgfrith sexual relations, lived abstemiously and obtained his permission to become a nun. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

 
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Æthelwine (Ethelwine, Ailwyn)

(d. 992) [ODNB]

Youngest son of Æthelstan, the Half-King; ealdor of East Anglia (962 - 92); founder of Ramsey Abbey, Huntingdonshire

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Agilbert

(d. 679x90) [ODNB; Gams]

A Frank who had been ordained bishop before arriving in the kingdom of the West Saxons after 646; had studied in Ireland

Bishop of Dorchester c. 650; bishop of Paris (666/7 - death) Attended the synod of Whitby in 664, supporting the Roman position.

Agilbert went to Northumbria to ordain Wilfrid, abbot of Ripon, priest. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

Agilbert, James the deacon of Paulinus, Wilfrid and Alchfrith, son of King Oswiu, and his wife Cyneburh held to the Roman method of calculating the date of Easter. 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

Agilbert was asked by King Oswiu at the synod of Whitby to put forward the Roman position. Agilbert asked that Wilfrid speak for him, as he was more familiar with the English tongue. 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

 
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Aldhelm

(d. 709/10) [ODNB]

Scholar; abbot of Malmesbury; bishop of Sherborne 706; prolific writer; said to be founder of Malmesbury abbey

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Alfred (the Great)

(848/9 - 899) [ODNB]

King of the West Saxons and of the Anglo-Saxons (871 - 99)

Youngest son of Aethelwulf of Wessex. Military, legal and educational reformer.

Arthur founded a monastery at Athelney and a convent at Shaftesbury. 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Anna of the East Angles

(d. 654?) [ODNB]

King of the East Angles; came to power after Penda of Mercia invaded and killed Ecgric; killed during an invasion by Penda

Anna was the father of three holy daughters: Æthelthryth, Seaxburh and Æthelburh. 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

 
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Botwulf (St Botolph)

(fl. 654 - c. 670) [ODNB]

Abbot of Iken, Suffolk (654 - c. 670)

Botwulf built an abbey in the eastern part of Lincolnshire. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 122.

 
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Cadwallon (Caedwalla) ap Cadfan

(d. 634) [ODNB]

King of Gwynedd (c. 625 - 34)

Killed Eadwine of Northumbria in 633; killed Osric of Deira and Eanfrith of Bernicia in 634; was killed by Oswald

Cadwallon and Penda of Mercia killed Eadwine of Northumbria and his son in battle at Hatfield. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

Eanfrith of Bernicia and Osric of Deira were killed in battle by Cadwallon of Gwynedd and Penda of Mercia. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

Cadwallon of Gwynedd and Penda of Mercia, having defeated and killed Eadwine, Eanfrith and Osric, attempted the same with Oswald. After a fierce battle, Oswald's forces prevailed. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

 
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Cedd (St Cedd)

(d. 664) [ODNB]

Trained at Lindisfarne; bishop of the East Saxons; missionary to the Middle Angles

Cedd was sent into the kingdom of the East Saxons after the conversion of King Sigeberht Sanctus. 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

Cedd was the second bishop of London, following Mellitus. 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

He was appointed prolocutor at the Synod of Whitby in 664. 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

When King Oswiu decided in favour of the Roman position on the calculation of the date of Easter, Cedd agreed to accept it. 1570, p. 166; 1576, p. 125; 1583, p. 124.

 
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Cenwalh of Wessex

(d. 672) [ODNB]

Son of Cynegils; king of the Gewisse (West Saxons) (642 - 45, 648 - 72)

Driven into exile (645 - 48) by Penda of Mercia

Cenwalh went to battle alongside his father and brother, Cwichelm, against Eadwine of Northumbria, and they were defeated. 1570, p. 162; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

Wulfhere, king of Mercia, defeated Cenwalh and obtained the Isle of Wight. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 122.

Cynegils began construction of the church at Winchester [Foxe mistakenly calls him the king of Mercia]. It was completed by his son Cenwalh, who appointed Wine bishop there. 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Cenwulf of Mercia

(d. 821) [ODNB]

King of the Mercians (796 - 821)

Distant relative of his predecessor Ecgfrith, son of Offa; it is possible that Offa had had closer relatives killed.

Cenwulf went to war against the men of Kent. 1570, p. 154; 1576, p. 115; 1583, p. 114.

Cenwulf had Eadberht III Præn bound and taken prisoner into Mercia. Cenwulf later built a church at Winchcombe, invited Eadberht into it, and restored him to his throne. 1570, p. 173; 1576, p. 131; 1583, p. 130.

Cenwulf, according to a story, was beheaded while hunting by his sister and his tutor. 1570, p. 154; 1576, p. 115; 1583, p. 114.

 
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Chuthburh (St Cuthburga)

(fl. c. 700 - 718) [ODNB]

Daughter of King Coenred of Wessex; sister of King Ine

Married King Aldfrith of Northumbria; separated; supposed abbess of Wimborne

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Cyneburh

(fl. C7) [ODNB sub Kings of the Hwicce]

Sister of King Osric of the Hwicce; first abbess of Gloucester Abbey

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Cynegils of Wessex

(d. 642) [ODNB]

King of the Gewisse (West Saxons) (611 - 42), with his son Cwichelm to 636

First West Saxon king converted to Christianity

He and his son were said to have killed the East Saxon king Sigeberht Parvus. 1570, pp. 149, 151; 1576, pp. 111, 113; 1583, pp. 110, 112.

Cynegils and Cwichelm plotted the assassination of Eadwine of Northumbria, but the attempt failed. Eadwine then attacked the West Saxons and defeated them. 1570, p. 162; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 120.

King Oswald of Northumbria was partly responsible for the conversion of Cynegils. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 122.

King Oswald of Northumbria stood godfather to Cynegils and married his daughter. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 122.

Cynegils began construction of the church at Winchester [Foxe mistakenly calls him the king of Mercia]. It was completed by his son Cenwalh, who appointed Wine bishop there. 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Eadwine of Northumbria

(c. 586 - 633) [ODNB]

Son of Aella, king of Deira; prince of Deira

King of Northumbria (616 - 33); converted to Christianity; killed in battle against Penda of Mercia and Cadwallon

Eadwine, when he was young, was persecuted by Æthelfrith, king of Northumbria, and fled to Rædwald of the East Angles. Rædwald, through fear of Æthelfrith and bribery, intended to betray Eadwine. His mind was changed by his wife, and he met Æthelfrith in battle, where Æthelfrith was killed. Eadwine then was made king. 1570, pp. 160-61; 1576, pp. 120-21; 1583, pp. 119-20.

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Æthelfrith was killed in battle by his successor, Eadwine. 1570, p. 160; 1576, p. 120; 1583, p. 119.

Cynegils and Cwichelm of the West Saxons plotted the assassination of Eadwine of Northumbria, but the attempt failed. His servant was killed instead; Eadwine was seriously wounded. He promised to convert to Christianity if he was victorious over the West Saxons. In token of this, he had his daughter, born on the day he was wounded, baptised by Paulinus. Eadwine then attacked the West Saxons and defeated them. 1570, p. 162; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 120.

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In spite of his promise, Eadwine was reluctant to convert. 1563, p. 18; 1570, p. 162; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

Eadwine was converted and baptised by Paulinus, bishop of London, at York. 1563, p. 18; 1570, pp. 150, 162; 1576, pp. 112, 122; 1583, pp. 111, 120.

Through the efforts of Eadwine, King Earpwald of the East Angles adopted Christianity fully. 1563, p. 18; 1570, pp. 151, 163; 1576, pp. 113, 122; 1583, pp. 112, 121.

Eadwine was killed in battle by Cadwallon and Penda. 1570, p. 162; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

 
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Earconwald (St Earconwald, Erkenwald)

(d. 693) [ODNB]

Abbot of Chertsey (c. 664 - 693); founded Barking Abbey

Bishop of the East Saxons (675/6 - 93)

Although Earconwald's legs would no longer allow him to walk or ride a horse, he rode in a litter to be able to preach throughout his diocese. 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

 
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Ecgfrith of Northumbria

(645/6 - 685) [ODNB]

Elder son of Oswiu

King of Northumbria (670 - 85); conflict with Wilfred, bishop of York; struggled against Mercia and the Picts; killed in battle against the Picts

Ecgfrith, when he came to the throne, promoted Cuthbert to the bishopric of Lindisfarne. He supported the replacement of Wilfred as bishop of York with Ceadda. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

Ecgfrith's wife Etheldreda refused sexual relations, lived abstemiously and obtained his permission to become a nun. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

 
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Ecgwine(St Ecgwine)

(d. 717?) [ODNB]

Bishop of Worcester (c. 692 - 717)

Ecgwine founded the abbey of Evesham. 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

Miracles were attributed to Ecgwine. 1570, p. 168; 1576, p. 127; 1583, p. 125.

 
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Edgar (Edgar Pacificus)

(943/4 - 975) [ODNB]

King of England (959 - 75); crowned in 973 at Bath

Younger son of Edmund I and Aelgifu; king of the Mercians in 957; welcomed Dunstan when he had been expelled by Eadwig.

Edgar rebuilt the abbey of Chertsey founded by Bishop Earconwald and the abbey at Glastonbury. 1570, p. 177, 1576, p. 134, 1583, p. 133.

Pope John XIII wrote to King Edgar, telling him to appoint only monks as bishops and to replace the secular prebendaries at Winchester with monks. 1570, p. 1350; 1576, p. 1152; 1583, p. 1181.

Under Edgar, emphasis on the monastic profession of a celibate life and opposition to clerical marriage increased. 1570, p. 1339, 1576, p. 1142, 1583, p. 1171.

 
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Ely

Elderly chantry priest at Windsor

At dinner at Windsor, Master Ely complained of laymen who meddled with the scriptures and was challenged by Robert Testwood. When Testwood supported the king's supremacy over the church, Ely called him a heretic, refused to have anything more to do with him and reported him to the dean's deputy. A few days later, the act of supremacy was passed and the dean returned, attacking papal supremacy. 1570, p. 1386; 1576, p. 1182; 1583, p. 1211.

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Eorcenberht of Kent

(d. 664) [ODNB]

King of Kent (640 - 64); son of Eadbald

Eorcenberht was the first king of Kent to order fasting during Lent. 1570, p. 149; 1576, p. 111; 1583, p. 110.

 
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Eorcengota

Daughter of King Eorcenberht of Kent [ODNB sub Eorcenberht]

Sister of Eormenhild; nun in the monastery of Faremoutiers, near Meaux

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 178; 1576, p. 135; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Eormenhild of Mercia

(fl. C7) [ODNB sub Wulfhere]

Daughter of King Eorcenberht of Kent; married Wulfhere, king of the Mercians; niece of Æthelthryth, abbess of Ely

Soon after Wulfhere married Eormenhild, he converted to Christianity. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 122.

Foxe mistakenly says that the sister nuns Mildrith and Mildburg were Wulfhere's daughters. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

 
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Fursa (St Fusa, Fursey)

(d. 649) [ODNB]

b. Ireland; founded monastery in Louth, Ireland; missionary monk in England; founded monastery at Cnobheresburg, lived as hermit; fled to Francia after attack by Penda

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, pp. 177, 1349; 1576, pp. 134, 1151; 1583, pp. 133, 1180.

 
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Heiu

According to Bede, the first nun in Northumbria, who was consecrated by Áedán, founded the monastery of Hartlepool, and retired to Tadcaster [ODNB sub Bega]

She is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Hereric

Deiran prince; father of St Hilda [ODNB sub Hild]

Nephew of Eadwine, King of Northumbria; exiled, murdered

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Hild (St Hilda)

(614 - 680) [ODNB]

Daughter of Hereric, prince of Deira; baptized with Eadwine of Northumbria in 627; became a nun c. 647; founded Streanaeshalch (Strensall)/Whitby in 657

Abbess of Strensall-Whitby (657 - 80); established a school there

Hild, with Colmán, bishop of the Northumbrians, held to the Irish method of calculating the date of Easter. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

The Synod of Whitby was held in Hild's abbey in 664. 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

 
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Ine of Wessex

(d. in or after 726) [ODNB]

Son of Coenred; king of the West Saxons (c. 694 - c. 726); codified law; abdicated in 726, died as a pilgrim in Rome

Ine succeeded Cædwalla, king of the West Saxons. [Foxe calls Cædwalla the last king of the Britons, but Cadwaladr ap Cadwallon, king of Gwynedd, was the legendary last king of the Britons.] 1570, p. 167; 1576, p. 126; 1583, p. 125.

Ine brought the Peter Pence into his realm. He introduced written laws. 1570, p. 169; 1576, p. 128; 1583, p. 127.

Queen Æthelburh, who wished to retire from the world into a convent, defiled and ruined the palace to illustrate to Ine the transience of worldly things. He was persuaded to abdicate. 1570, p. 169; 1576, p. 128; 1583, pp. 126-27.

Ine founded the abbey at Glastonbury. 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

Ine went to Rome and became a monk. 1570, p. 149; 1576, p. 111; 1583, p. 110.

 
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Ingeld

Brother of King Ine of West Saxons and of Cuthburh; founder of Wimborne Abbey [ODNB sub Ine]

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Offa of Mercia

(d. 796) [ODNB]

King of the Mercians (757 - 96); dominant ruler in England by the end of the reign; built military earthwork, Offa's Dyke, against the Welsh; had Æthelberht, king of the East Anglians, beheaded in 794

Offa, kinsman of King Æthelbald, ousted Beornred and became king of the Mercians. 1570, p. 171, 1576, p. 129, 1583, p. 128.

Offa won victories over Eadberht of Northumbria and Æthelred of the East Angles. He established an archbishopric in Lichfield, with the agreement of Pope Adrian. He chased the Britons into Wales and built a defensive dyke. 1570, p. 173; 1576, p. 130; 1583, p. 129.

Alcuin was sent to Charlemagne by Offa of Mercia in hopes of cementing peace between them. Charlemagne held Alcuin in high esteem and made him abbot of Tours. 1570, p. 173; 1576, p. 131; 1583, p. 129

Charlemagne sent a letter to King Offa, praising Pope Adrian I. 1570, p. 175; 1576, p. 132; 1583, p. 131

Upon his return from France to England, Alcuin complained about the state of the country into which he had arrived in letters to Offa of Mercia, Æthelred of Northumbria and Æthelheard, archbishop of Canterbury. 1570, p. 176; 1576, p. 133; 1583, p. 132.

Offa of Mercia gave one of his daughters to Beorhtric of Wessex in marriage. 1570, p. 173; 1576, p. 131; 1583, p. 129.

Æthelberht, king of the East Angles, came to Offa's court to marry his daughter. Offa had him murdered due to the counsel of his wife. 1570, pp. 151, 154; 1576, pp. 113, 115; 1583, pp. 112, 114.

Cynethryth, Offa's queen, suspected that Æthelberht was coming to Offa's court, under pretence of marrying their daughter, to murder him and the Mercians. 1570, p. 173; 1576, p. 131; 1583, p. 129.

Offa had Æthelberht brought in on his own and then had him beheaded. 1570, p. 173; 1576, p. 131; 1583, p. 129.

In repentance for Æthelberht's murder, Offa brought in the Peter's Pence. He gave lands to the church, built monasteries and the abbey of St Alban's in penance. 1570, pp. 150, 173; 1576, pp. 112, 131; 1583, pp. 111, 129.

 
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Osric

(fl. 674 - 679) [ODNB]

King of the Hwicce (674 - 79); brother of Oswald

Founder of Gloucester monastery; his sister Cyneburh was the first abbess

He is mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
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Oswald of Northumbria (St Oswald)

(603/4 - 642) [ODNB]

Second son of Æthelfrith; exiled with his brothers at their father's death

King of Northumbria (634 - 42); converted to Christianity while in exile; killed in battle against Penda of Mercia

Cadwallon of Gwynedd and Penda of Mercia, having defeated and killed Eadwine, Eanfrith and Osric, attempted the same with Oswald. After a fierce battle, Oswald's forces prevailed. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

Oswald overcame Penda and Cadwallon in battle through prayer. He sent for Áedán to preach and translated for him. 1570, pp. 150, 163; 1576, pp. 112, 122; 1583, pp. 111, 121.

Oswald converted to Christianity while in exile with the Irish and learned their language. He was thus able to translate for Áedán. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 121.

Oswald was partly responsible for the conversion of King Cynegils of the West Saxons. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 122.

Oswald stood godfather to King Cynegils of the West Saxons and married his daughter. He was killed in battle against Penda of Mercia. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 122.

 
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Oswiu of Northumbria

(611/12 - 670) [ODNB]

Son of Æthelfrith; exiled with his brothers at their father's death; baptised as a Christian in exile

King of Northumbria (642 - 70); struggle with Penda of Mercia; chaired the synod of Whitby in 664

Before battle, Oswiu dedicated his daughter to religion, along with 12 lordships to found 12 monasteries. 1570, p. 150; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

Oswiu was a friend of King Sigeberht of the East Saxons and was instrumental in his conversion. 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

King Oswiu gave with his daughter Ælfflæd 12 lordships to found 12 monasteries, six each in Bernicia and Deira. 1570, pp. 150, 177; 1576, pp. 112, 134; 1583, pp. 111, 133.

Penda of Mercia gave his consent to the marriage of his son Peada with Alhflæd, daughter of Oswiu. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 122.

Oswiu killed Penda of Mercia in battle. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 123; 1583, p. 122.

Oswiu presided over the Synod of Whitby in 664 and opened it with an oration. 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

Oswiu, having listened to spokesmen for both the Irish and the Roman positions on the calculation of the date of Easter, decided in favour of the Roman. 1570, pp. 165-66; 1576, pp. 124-25; 1583, pp. 123-24.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Paulinus (St Paulinus)

(d. 644) [ODNB]

Bishop of York 625 and of Rochester 633; one of the monks sent by Gregory I in 601; worked to convert Eadwine of Northumbria

Eadwine of Northumbria was converted and baptised by Paulinus at York. 1563, p. 18; 1570, pp. 150, 163; 1576, pp. 112, 122; 1583, pp. 111, 121.

Eadwine was reluctant to convert, but Paulinus worked patiently to persuade him. Paulinus baptised many people in the rivers of the realm, and he built a stone church at Lincoln. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

Paulinus was the first bishop of York, consecrated by Justus, archbishop of Canterbury. Upon the death of Justus, Paulinus consecrated Honorius as his successor. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

After the death of King Eadwine, and the conquest by Cadwallon of Gwynedd and Penda of Mercia, the subsequent disorder forced Paulinus to flee into Kent, along with Queen Æthelburh and her daughter Eanflæd. There Paulinus became bishop of Rochester. 1570, p. 163; 1576, p. 122; 1583, p. 121.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ramsey

(d. c. 1541)

Martyred at Salisbury with fellow interlude players Richard Spenser and Hewet

Ramsey was charged with heresy about the sacrament of the altar and burnt at Salisbury. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1174; 1583, p. 1202.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sæberht of the East Saxons

(d. 616/17) [ODNB sub Kings of the East Saxons]

King of the East Saxons; nephew of King Æthelberht of Kent, his overlord

Converted to Christianity by Mellitus in 604

Sæberht was the first of the East Saxon kings to be converted. 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 112; 1583, p. 111.

With Æthelberht of Kent, Sæberht built the church of St Paul's in London. They translated the archbishop's see to Canterbury. 1570, pp. 149, 161, 177; 1576, pp. 111, 121, 134; 1583, pp. 110, 120, 133.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sigeberht of the East Angles

(fl. 630/31 - 654) [ODNB]

King of the East Angles C7; resigned and entered a monastery

Left to lead an army against Penda of Mercia, but refused to bear arms; killed in battle

Sigeberht was brought out of the monastery to fight Penda, but carried only a white stick into battle. 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wihtred of Kent

(d. 725) [ODNB]

Son of Ecgberht I; brother of Eadric; foreign kings contended for the throne until Wihtred could establish his rule

King of Kent (690 - 725); ruled with Swæfheard (690 - c. 692)

Wihtred built the monastery of St Martin in Dover. 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wilfrid (St Wilfrid)

(c. 634 - 709/10) [ODNB]

Abbot of Ripon (c. 658 - 78, 686)

Bishop of Northumbria, York (664 - 78, 686 - 92)

Abbot of Hexham (672 - 78, 686); exile in Sussex, missionary; abbot of Selsey

Bishop of Leicester (692 - 703); guardian of Osred

Bishop of Hexham (706 - 709/10)

Agilbert, bishop of Dorchester, went to Northumbria to ordain Wilfred priest. 1570, p. 164; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

Agilbert, James the deacon of Paulinus, Wilfrid and Alchfrith, son of King Oswiu, and his wife Cyneburh held to the Roman method of calculating the date of Easter. 1570, p. 165; 1576, p. 124; 1583, p. 123.

Agilbert was asked by King Oswiu at the Synod of Whitby to put forward the Roman position. Agilbert asked that Wilfrid speak for him, as he was more familiar with the English tongue, and Wilfred put the Roman case. The king decided in his favour. 1570, pp. 165-66; 1576, pp. 124-25; 1583, pp. 123-24.

Theodore, archbishop of Canterbury, replaced Wilfrid as bishop of York with Ceadda. This was supported by King Ecgfrith of Northumbria. Wilfrid went to Rome to complain to Pope Agatho, but the king's and archbishop's friends there meant he was unsuccessful. He went into the realm of the South Saxons and founded an abbey at Selsey. 1570, p. 166; 1576, p. 125; 1583, p. 124.

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King Aldfrith of Northumbria restored Wilfrid to the bishopric of York, but after about five years removed him again. Wilfrid went to Rome. He was restored again by King Osred I of Northumbria. 1570, p. 166; 1576, p. 125; 1583, p. 124.

Wilfred founded the abbeys at Selsey and Ripon. 1570, p. 177; 1576, p. 134; 1583, p. 133.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wine

(fl. c. 660 - c. 675) [ODNB]

1st bishop of Winchester (c. 660 - 663/6); purchased the see of the East Saxons, based at London

Wine was guilty of simony. 1570, p. 151; 1576, p. 113; 1583, p. 112.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Abington [Abbington; Abbendon]

Northamptonshire

OS grid ref: SP 774 615

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Athelney

[Echelinghey]

Somerset

OS grid ref: ST 345 285

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bardney

Lincolnshire

OS grid ref: TF 115 704

 
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Barking
NGR: TQ 445 845

A parish in the hundred of Becontree, county of Essex. 23 miles south-west from Chelmsford, and 7 miles north-east from London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Essex and Diocese of London.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cambridge (Grantbridge)

[Cambrige; Grantbrige; Grantebryge]

OS grid ref: TL 465 585

County town of Cambridgeshire and university town

 
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Chertsey

[Chertesey]

Surrey

OS grid ref: TQ 043 671

 
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Cnobheresburg [Knouesborough] (Burgh Castle)

Suffolk

OS grid ref: TG 474 045

 
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Dover
Douer
NGR: TR 320 414

One of the Cinq Ports, a borough and a market town, having separate jurisdiction; locally in the Lathe of St Augustine, eastern division of the County of Kent. 16 miles south east by south from Canterbury. Dover formerly consisted of the parishes of St James the Apostle, St John, St Martin the Greater, St Martin the Less, St Mary the Virgin, St Nicholas and St Peter - all subsequently merged into St James and St Mary. The living of St Mary is a perpetual curacy in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Canterbury, and in the patronage of the parishioners. The living of St James is a discharged rectory in the jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ely
Ely
NGR: TL 540 800

A city in the Isle of Ely, county of Cambridge. 16 miles north-north-east from Cambridge. The city is exclusively of the liberty of the College, which is extra-parochial, and comprises the parishes of St. Mary and Holy Trinity, in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Dean and Chapter, within the Diocese of Ely, of which it is the seat

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Evesham

[Eusham]

Worcestershire

OS grid ref: SP 035 435

 
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Glastonbury

Somerset

OS grid ref: ST 502 384

 
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Gloucester
Gloucester
NGR: SO 830 187

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Dudstone and Kings Barton, county of Gloucester. 34 miles north-north-east from Bristol. The city comprises the parishes of St. Aldate, St. John Baptist, St. Mary de Crypt, St. Mary de Grace, St. Nicholas, St. Owen and Holy Trinity; also parts of St. Catherine, St. Mary de Lode and St. Michael, all in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Gloucester, of which it is the seat. St. John Baptist, St. Mary de Crypt and St. Michael are discharged rectories; St. Mary de Lode and Holy Trinity are discharged vicarages; St. Aldate, St. Catherine, St. Mary de Grace and St. Nicholas are perpetual curacies

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hartlepool [Heorenton]

County Durham

OS grid ref: NZ 505 325

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Heavenfield [Heuenfield]

nr Hexham, Northumberland

OS grid ref: NY 933 640

 
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Ikanho [Ioanno]

Lincolnshire

Probably near Boston [VCH: Lincolnshire, vol 2 (1906) pp. 96-97]"

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lastingham [Lestingey] Abbey

nr Kirkby Moorside, North Yorkshire

OS grid ref: SE 725 905

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Malmesbury

[Malmesbery]

Wiltshire

OS grid ref: ST 935 875

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Old Melrose

nr Melrose, Scotland

OS grid ref: NT 585 345

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Peterborough

[Peterborowe]

Cambridgeshire

OS grid ref: TL 195 995

Cathedral city

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ramsey
Ramesey
NGR: TM 213 303

A parish in the hundred of Tendring, county of Essex. 3 miles west-south-west from Harwich. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Colchester, diocese of London

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ripon

North Yorkshire

OS grid ref: SE 315 715

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Selsey [Silesey; Sealesey]

West Sussex

OS grid ref: SZ 855 935

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Shaftesbury

[Shaftsbury]

Dorset

OS grid ref: ST 865 225

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
St Albans
S. Albones, Saint Albons
NGR: TL 155 075

Borough, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the Hundred of Cashio, Hertfordshire. 12.5 miles west-by-south from Hertford; 20 miles north-west-by-north from London. The town comprises the parish of St Alban, or the Abbey parish, and part of the parish of St Michael and St Peter, in the archdeaconry of St Albans, diocese of London

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
St Albans (Verulamium) [S. Albanes; S. Albons]

Hertfordshire

OS grid ref: TL 155 075

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Westminster

London

OS grid ref: TQ 301 794

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Whitby

North Yorkshire

OS grid ref: NZ 904 112

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wimborne Minster

[Winburne]

Dorset

OS grid ref: SU 015 005

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Winchcombe

[Wincombe]

Gloucestershire

OS grid ref: SP 022 283

156 [133]

Monasteries and Vniuersities builded in England. The donations of K. Ethelbald. Nunnes.

here follow to be seene.

MarginaliaPaules Church. First the Church or Minster of S. Paule in London, was founded by Ethelbert king of Kent, and Sigebert kyng of Essex, about the yeare of our Lord. 604.

MarginaliaThe first aultar and crosse set vp in England. The first crosse and aulter within this realm was first set vp in the North partes in Heuenfield, vpon the occasion of Oswald king of Northumberland, fighting against Cadwalla, where he in the same place set vp the signe of the crosse, kneelyng and praying there for victory, Polychron. lib. 5. cap. 12. An. 635.

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MarginaliaThe church of Winchester. The Church of Winchester was first begon and founded by Kingilsus king of Mercians, hauing 9. myles about it: after finished by his sonne Kewalcus, where Wyne, of englishmen was first bishop, An. 636. Guliel. Malmesb. Lib. De gestis pont. Ang.

MarginaliaThe church of Lincolne. The Church of Lincolne first founded by Paulinus Bishop, An. 629.

MarginaliaThe church of Westminster. The Church of Westminster began first by a certayne Citizen of London, through the instigatiō of Ethelbert king of Kent, which before was an Ile of thornes, Bed. An. 614.

MarginaliaThe scholes at Cambridge. The common schooles first erected at Cambridge by Sigebert king of Eastangles, An. 636.

MarginaliaAbbey of Knouisburgh. The Abbey of Knouisburgh builded by Furceus the Hermite, An. 637.

MarginaliaMalmesb. The monasterie of Malmesbery by one Meldulfus a Scot, about the yeare of our Lord, 640. Afterward inlarged by Agilbert bishop of Winchester.

MarginaliaAbbey of Glocester. The Monasterie in Glocester, first builded by Osricus King of Mercia, as Cestrensis sayth. But as William Malmesb. writeth, by Vlferus, and Etheldred brethren to Kineburga Abbesse of the same house, An 679.

MarginaliaMailrose. The monastery of Mailrose by the floud of Twide by Aidanus a Scottish bishop.

MarginaliaHeorenton. The Nunnery of Heorenton by Heui, who was the first Nunne in Northumberland, Bede, Lib. 4 cap. 1.

MarginaliaHetesey. The Monastery of Hetesey by Oswy Kyng of Northumberlād, who also with his daughter Elfred, gaue possessions for twelue monasteries in the partes of Northūberland, An. 656.

MarginaliaThe monastery of S. Martin at Douer. The monasterie of S. Martine in Douer, builded by Whitrcd king of Kent.

MarginaliaLestingey. The Abbey of Lestingey by Ceadda (whom we call S. Cedd) through the graunt of Oswald, sonne to S. Oswald, King of Northum. An. 651.

The Monastery of Whitby called otherwise Strenhalt by Hilda MarginaliaWhitbie. This Hilda was first conuerted to the fayth by Paulinus a godly and learned woman, out of her Monastery came fiue Byshops Dosa, Eatha, Osiford, Ioannes, Wilfride. daughter to the nephew of Edwyne Kyng of Northumberland, An 657.

MarginaliaHacanos. Item an other monastery called Hacanos, not far from the same place builded by the sayd Hilda the same yeare.

MarginaliaAbington. The Abbey of Abbington builded by Cissa Kyng of Southsex, An. 666.

MarginaliaIoanno at Lincolne. Item an Abbey in the East side of Lyncolne called Ioanno, by S. Botulph. Polychro. Lib. 5 cap. 16. An. 654.

MarginaliaEly Abbey. The monastery in Ely founded by Etheldred or Edeldrida daughter of Anna king of Eastangles, and the wyfe of Elfrid king of Northumb. An. 674.

MarginaliaChertsey. The Monastery of Chertsey in Southrey, founded by Erkenwald bishop of London, an 674 thrown down by the Danes, after reedified by king Edgar.

MarginaliaBerkyng. Item the Nunnery of Berking edified by the sayd Erkenwaldus bishop of London about the same tyme.

MarginaliaPeterborough. The Abbey of Peterborough called otherwise Modehamstede founded by King Ethewald King of the Mercians, An 675.

MarginaliaBardney. Bardney Abbey by Etheldredus King of the Merciās, An. 700.

MarginaliaGlastonbery. Glastonbury by Iua king of the Westsaxons, and after repayred and enriched by King Edgar, an. 701.

MarginaliaCamesey. Ramesey in the tyme of king Edgar by one Ailwinus a noble mā, an. 973. King Edgar builded in his tyme 40. monasteries, who raigned, an. 901.

MarginaliaWinburne. The Nunnery of Winburne builded by Cuthburga sister to Ingilsus, king Iua his brother, an 717.

MarginaliaSealesey. The Monastery of Sealesey by the Ile of Wight, by Wilfridus bishop of Yorke, an. 678.

MarginaliaWincombe. The Monastery of Wincombe by Kenulphus Kyng of the Mercians, an. 737.

MarginaliaS. Albones. S. Albanes builded by Offa, King of the Mercians. Anno. 755.

MarginaliaEusham. The Abbey of Eusham by Egwinus Byshop. An. 691.

MarginaliaRipon. Ripon in the North by Wilfridus Bishop. An. 709.

MarginaliaEchelinghey. The Abbey of Echelinghey, by king Aluerdus, an. 891.

MarginaliaS. Shaftesbury. The Nunnery of Shaftesbury by the same Aluredus, the same yeare.

Thus ye see what monasteries in what tyme began to be founded by the Saxons kings, newly conuerted to the Christian fayth, within the space of 200. yeares: who, asthey semed then to haue a certain zeale & deuotion to godward, according to the leading & teaching that then was: so it semeth againe to me, two things to be wished in these foresayd kings. Marginalia Two thinges to be wished in them, that first builded Monkishe Monasteries. First, that they which began to erect these monasteries and celles of Monkes and Nunnes, to lyue soly and singlely by themselues out of the holy state of matrimony: had forseene what daunger & what absurd enormities might and also did thereof ensue, both publikely to the Church of Christ, & priuately to their own soules. Secondly, that vnto this their zeale & deuotion had bene ioyned like knowledge & doctrine in Christes gospell, especially in the article of our free iustification by the faith of Iesu Christ. Marginalia The article of free iustification not knowne. Because of the lacke wherof, as wel the builders & founders therof, as they that were professed in the same, seeme both to haue run the wrong way, & to haue bene deceiued. For albeit in them was a deuotion & zeale of mynd, that thought well in this their doyng, which I wil not here reprehend: yet the end and cause of their deedes & buildings cannot be excused, beyng contrary to the rule of Christes Gospel, for so much as they did these things seeking thereby merites with God, and for remedy of theyr soules, and remission of their sinnes, as may appeare testified in their owne recordes, wherof one here I thought to set forth for probation of the same. Read this Charte (if it please thee gentle Reader) of king Ethelbald his donation, & charter giuen to churches and religious persons, which Ethelbald was the builder (as is sayd) of Peterborough, and the wordes of his record and instrument be these.

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The donations and priuiledges granted and geuen by King Ethelbald to religious men of the Church.

Marginalia Ex Cronicis Guliel. Malmesb. Lib. 1. PLerumq; contingere solent; pro incerta temporum vicissitudine, vt ea quæ multarum fidelium personarum testimonio consilioq; roborata fuerint fraudulenter per contumaciā plurimorum, & machinamenta simulationis, sine vlla consideratione rationis, periculose dissipentur, nisi autoritate literarum (testamento Chyrographorum) æternæ memoriæ comittantur. Quapropter, ego Ethelbaldus rex Merciorum, pro amore cælestis patriæ, & remedio animæ meæ, studendum esse præuidi: vt eam per bona opera liberam efficerem in omni vinculo delictorum. Quoniam enim mihi omnipotens Deus per misericordiam clementiæ suæ, absque vllo antecedente merito, sceptra regiminis largitus est: ideo libenter ei, ex eo quod dedit, retribuo. Huius rei gratia hanc donationem, me viuente, concedo, vt omnia monasteria & Ecclesiæ regni mei, à publicis vectigalibus, & operibus, & oneribus absoluantur: nisi instructionibus arcium, vel pontium quæ nulli vnquam prosunt. Præterea habeant famuli Dei, propriam libertatem in fructibus siluarum & agrorum, & in captura piscium, ne munuscula præbeant vel regi, vel principibus, nisi voluntaria. Sed liberi Deo seruiant, &c.

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By the contentes hereof may be well vnderstand (as where he sayth, pro amore cælestis patriæ, pro remedio animæ, pro liberatione animæ, & absolutione delictorum, &c.) how great the ignoraunce and blindenesse of these men was: who lacking no zeale, onely lacked knowledge to rule it withall: seeking their saluation not by Christ onely, but by their owne deseruings and meritorious deedes. Which I recite here not to any infamy or reprehensiō of them, but rather to put vs in minde and memory, how much we at this present are bound to God, for the true sincerity of his truth: hidden so long before to our foreauncetors, and opened now to vs by the good will of our God, in his sonne Christ Iesu. This onely lamēting by the way, to see them to haue such works, and to lacke our fayth: and vs to haue the right fayth, and to lacke their workes. And this blinde ignoraūce of that age, thus aboue prenoted, was the cause not onely why these kinges builded so many Monasteries vpon zealous superstition, but also why so many of them, forsaking their orderly vocation of Princely regiment, gaue themselues ouer to Monasticall profession, or rather wilfull superstition. Concerning the names and number of which kings that were professed Monkes, is sufficiently in the storye before declared: the namesof whome wee shewed to be seuen or eight, within the space of these two hundreth yeres. Such was then the superstitious deuotiō of kings & Princes in that age: and no lesse also to bee noted in Queenes and kings daughters, with other noble women, of the same age and time. The names of whom, it were to long here to recite. Marginalia A briefe Cataloge of Queenes and Kinges daughters, which leauing their estate were made Nunnes. Marginalia Hilda. As Hilda daughter to the nephew of Edwine king of Northumberland. Abbesse of the house of Ely. Marginalia Erchengoda. Ermenilda. Edelberga. Etheldreda. Erchengoda with her sister Ermenilda daughters of Ercombertus king of Kent: whiche Erchengoda was professed in Saint Brigets order in Fraunce. Item Edelberga wyfe and Queene to Kyng Edwyne of Northumberland, and daughter of kyng Anna, which was also in

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