Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Dane

Crossbearer to the university; BD (1556) [Venn]

John Dane was a friend and supporter of Rawlins White. Dane visited White in prison, bringing him money and other necessities. He was the author of the detailed account of White's life and martyrdom printed in 1570, pp. 1726-29; 1576, pp. 1473-76; 1583, pp. 1556-59.

 
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Rawlins White

(1495? - 1555)

Fisherman, martyr

In the 1563 edition there is only one sentence about Rawlins White; it states that he was burned on 5 March 1555 in Cardiff. 1563, p. 1101.

White was converted to protestantism in the reign of Edward VI and became an itinerant lay preacher. He headed conventicles in Mary's reign in the region around Cardiff. 1570, p. 1726; 1576, pp. 1473-80 [recte 1474]; 1583, pp. 1556-57.

After being imprisoned for three weeks after sentence was pronounced, White was burned in Cardiff in March 1555. He died with remarkable courage. 1570, pp. 1727-29; 1576, p. 1463 [recte 1475]-1476; 1583, pp. 1558-59.

 
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Aberguilly [Abergwili]
NGR: SN 438 209

Aberguilly Aberguily or Agerguily

A parish in the union of Carmarthen, lower division of the hundred of Elvet, county of Carmarthen. 2 miles east by north from Carmarthen. The living is a discharged vicarage in the patronage of the Dean and Canons of Windsor. Seat of the palace of the Bishops of St Davids.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Bishop Ferrar had a house there.

 
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Cardiff
NGR: ST 184 765

A borough, having separate jurisdiction and the head of a union, locally in the hundred of Kibbor, county of Glamorgan. 158 miles west from London. The borough consists of the parishes of St John Baptist and St Mary, both discharged vicarages consolidated in the diocese of Llandaff.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Carmarthen
NGR: SN 410 255

A borough and parish, the head of a union and a county of itself, locally in the hundreds of Elvet and Derllys, county of Carmarthen. 216 miles west by north from London. The town is wholly within the parish of St Peter, which is a discharged vicarage in the Diocese of St Davids.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1580 [1556]

Queene Mary. Letters of B. Farrer to the L. Chauncellor.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. March.Commissions into the countrey: therfore it may please your honour of your fauourable goodnesse, to graunt vnto your said Oratour a like Commission for the examination of witnesses in defence of his truth and honesty, against the aforenamed Thomas Lee, George Constantine, Tho. Yong, Rowland Mericke, and all other persons with their vniust articles, attestations, and sayings deposed agaynst hym. MarginaliaB. Farrar bound with his sureties in a thousād Markes to appeare in a matter of Premunire.And in tender consideration that your said Orator standeth bounden and sureties with hym, in the summe of a thousand markes, to appeare before the kyngs Iustice in the Sessions at Carmarthen, in Iuly next commyng, to aunswer to a forged matter of Premunire,  

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This was originally a series of statutes enacted in 1353, 1365 and 1393, limiting appeals to the papacy by English clerics and prescribing penalties for those promoting a papal bull or excommunication in England. By Ferrar?s day it had come to be used as a legal term for any clerical usurpation of royal power or authority.

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by the procurement and counsaile of his forenamed aduersaries malitiously surmised agaynst hym, to his vtter vndoyng: and furthermore, that your Orator beyng in debt to the kings maiesty, by reason of the malitious vexation of his foresayd aduersaries, cannot (if he remaine here) satisfie the same (for where as there be rerages to a great summe as well of the kyngs money, as of hys owne rentes, he can receyue none thereof, his aduersaries haue made such ill report, to his discredite, bearyng the people in hand that he shall come no more thither, by reason of which bruite, neyther hys owne tenaunts will pay their rentes and rerages, nor the priests their rerages due to the Kings maiestie, as well for anno secundo and tertio, as for quarto and quinto.) In consideration of all these thyngs, it may please your honourable goodnes to licence your sayd Oratour to depart into the Dioces for these affaires and other: & he shall be ready at all tymes at your honourable commaundement and pleasure to repaire againe, and euer to pray to the Lord Iesu for the perpetuall conseruation of your honor to his glory.

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Besides this letter he wrote another likewise to þe said Lord (who was, as seemeth, D. Goodricke L.Chancellor  

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In 1563, Foxe identified Cranmer and the earl of Warwick (John Dudley, laterduke of Nothumberland) as the recipients of these letters. In 1570, he claimed that Thomas Goodrich, the lord chancellor, was the recipient. In fact, they were probably sent to Cranmer and were certainly not sent to Goodrich (see Brown, p. 166).

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afore mentioned) wherein he declareth the whole cause of his trouble, how it rose against him by his aduersaries, as here followeth.

¶ Another letter written by the B. of S. Dauids, to the L. Chancellor aforesayd.  
Commentary  *  Close

In 1563, Foxe identified Cranmer and the earl of Warwick (John Dudley, laterduke of Nothumberland) as the recipients of these letters. In 1570, he claimed that Thomas Goodrich, the lord chancellor, was the recipient. In fact, they were probably sent to Cranmer and were certainly not sent to Goodrich (see Brown, p. 166).

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MarginaliaAn other letter of B. Farrar to the Lord Chauncellour.RIght honourable,  

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In this letter Ferrar was answering some of the charges brought against him in the complaint to the privy council.

and my very especiall good Lorde, with humble seruice and hearty thankes to God, and to you for your godly fauour towardes me at all times, as right plainly appeareth by your fatherly letters, most louingly admonishing me to incline vnto that which is very necessary, as charitable concord and vnity. This is further to beseeche your Lordship for the Lordes sake, not to be grieued, but benignly to heare and grauely to ponder that weighty matter, which appearing to other but a light griefe, to me is in very deede a right grieuous offence to Godward, with no little hinderaunce of his holy worde, and disturbaunce of the Kings godly proceedyngs, and may be great occasion of much inobedience, and disorder of good lyfe.

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Wherfore I am straitly bounden for the true zeale that I ought to beare vnto the word of lyfe, Christian religion, the kinges maiesties honor, and the godly quiet state of his people, not faintly to let fall the burthen of diligent redres to be sought at his maiesties hands by the godly wisdome of his most honourable and vpright Counsayle, but with hearty affection to beare it vp agaynst those high mynded, arrogant, stubborne, ambitious, couetous Canons, trusting in their biting tongues, with crafty preuention and vtterly vntrue surmises, to stop the lyght, that theyr vngodly misdoyngs in darkenesse shal eyther not be seene, or at the least may haue a coulourable appearaunce of right. In so much that I do not a little meruayle at these qualities in Maister Chaunter, the Canon and the Deane of Worcester, whose vngentle and vntrue behauiour I haue not onely knowen, but expertly prooued, and sensibly felte in two of the first, to my great losses, whereof I make no complaint.

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MarginaliaThe vnkinde dealing of George Constantine, against B. Farrar. But I wonder in my mynde and lament in my heart, the strange alteration & wilfull goyng backward of myne old faithful brother George Constantine the which knowyng them all three to haue bene in tymes past, either obstinate enemies to the true bearers of the crosse of Christ, or (at the least) priuy lurkers vnder pretence of fauour towards the Gospell, to sting the poore followers therof, seking but their own lucre and pleasure in all their doings) would so earnestly cleaue vnto them in their wrong deeds as to betray me with his tong, become vntrue of his promise, and a bearer of filthy sinne for lucres sake, euen yet stifly persisting in the same, namely, in thyngs manifestly knowen vnto many, although he would deny it, and that I might not be credited.

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And as for their Premunire,  

Commentary  *  Close

This was originally a series of statutes enacted in 1353, 1365 and 1393, limiting appeals to the papacy by English clerics and prescribing penalties for those promoting a papal bull or excommunication in England. By Ferrar?s day it had come to be used as a legal term for any clerical usurpation of royal power or authority.

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both George & they, at my first commyng, vngently deteinyng from M. Ferlee MarginaliaThis Ferlee was Chaūcellour to B. Farrar.hys commission of the Chauncellorship, would haue faced me down with the Premunire, because it was written in myne

owne name according to the statute: yet was I faine for the zeale of vnitie, not to see their vncurteous deedes, departing with M. Ferlee, for the auoyding of theyr malice and enuy, and gaue that office for the amitie of George, vnto M. Chaunter MarginaliaThis Chaunter was D. Yong. his sonne in lawe, and to D. Mericke the office of Cardigan. But seeyng afterward theyr couetous respect to their owne glory and lucre, not regardyng the reformatiō of sinne, and especially of shameles whoredome, MarginaliaD. Yong and D. Mericke remoued by B. Farrar frō their offices.I was compelled to remooue them, sore agaynst their wylles: and whereas I desired many and sundry tymes charitable redresse of their wrong doings in the vacation tyme, I obteyned many fayre wordes, and nothing in deede.

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MarginaliaThe wronges which B. Farrar receaued by Thomas Yong and D. Mericke. And desiring to haue sight of the booke of Statutes of the Church, for the knowledge of my duetie and theyrs, I could not obteine. Desiring to haue a key of the Chapterhouse seale, as my L. of Bath had, they would not deliuer it, but vpon conditions: yet was I contented to be brideled, receiuyng it as it pleased them to geue it. And further, requiring the sight of necessary euidences for the declaration of diuers thyngs, in trauers of my right, they would in no wyse graunt it. And thereupon consideryng theyr vngentlenesse, I mooued the Quo warranto,  

Commentary  *  Close

Under the royal injunctions, every church in the kingdom was required to have a copy of the English translation of Erasmus's Paraphrases of the Gospel.

knowyng right well that if they should shew any substantiall graunt vnder the kings seale for their corporation, it must therin appeare, the B. to be the head, and euer hath bene vnder the king: for other they neyther haue, nor had, except they would returne to Rome againe, as I trust they will not. And yet perceiuyng afterward, that they had no speciall graunt to shew, or els such as they would not shew, I my self for the respect of vnitie, wrote my letters to the Kyngs Attorney, by reason wherof the Quo warranto was stayed, and so yet remayneth.

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But as touching the certificate, the kings subsidie beyng due at Michaelmas last, and forborne til after Christmas, and lawfully demanded afore, they did vtterly refuse to pay, both to my Vicecollector and to my selfe, except I would take it of them in portions, not knowyng where to aske the rest, and it is committed vnto me in the kings roll a whole summe in grosse, to be receyued of the Canons residentaries for their Diuident: who because they cannot agree in diuiding, would haue the kings maiesty to tary for his money, till they can agree to make diuision: and I connot demand it of any perticular person, nor at any perticular place.

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Wherfore I most humbly beseech your fatherly goodnes for the Lordes sake, to persist and continue my good Lord and friend, vnto such time as ye finde me either desiring to be defended in my wrōg, or not willyng to put the iudgemēt of my right cause into your hands. And because that the residue of matters touching them and their vngentle, vntrue, and vngodly doyngs is too long, and I haue molested you too much with this my tedious letter, I shal now surcease: humbly beseeching your good Lordship to accept in good part this my boldnes proceding of necessity, and to pardon it for the loue of our Lord Iesu: who saue and keep you in helth, comfort, and honor, long to endure, for the aduauncement of his glory. Written at Agurguily this ix. of March.

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Your Lordships to command
during lyfe. R. F.

¶ The history of one Rawlins White, burned at Cardiffe in Wales, about the moneth of March, for the testimony of Christes Gospell, reported by Iohn Dane beyng yet alyue, who was almost continually with hym duryng his trouble, vnto hys death.  
Commentary  *  Close
The Martyrdom of Rawlins White

This account is a striking example of the importance of individual informants to the Acts and Monuments. All that the Rerum contains on White is a note stating that he was burned in Cardiff on 27 March 1555 (Rerum, p. 428). This note was reprinted in the 1563 edition. Then, in the 1570 edition, Foxe produced the detailed and vivid account of White, sent to him by a 'Master Dane'. There were no changes to this account in the 1576 and 1583 editions.

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MarginaliaRawlins White Martyr, burned at Cardiffe in Wales.FOr so much as we haue here passed the history of Maister Farrer, burned at the town of Carmardē in Wales I thought to adioyne and accompany with the same, the history also of one Rawlins White, a Fisherman, whiche both in the like cause, and in the same countrey of Wales, & also about the same moneth of March, and yere aforesayd, gaue his life like a valiāt souldior of Iesus Christ, to martyrdom, and was burned at Cardiffe: the proces of whose story here followeth expressed more at large.

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This Rawlins was by his calling or occupation a Fisherman, liuing & continuing in the said trade by the space of xx. yeres at the least, in the town of Cardiffe, beyng (as a man of his vocation might be) one of a very good name, & well accompted amongst hys neighbours. As touchyng his religion at the first, it can not otherwyse be knowen, but that he was a great partaker of the superstitiō and Idolatry that then was vsed, I meane in the rainge of K. Henry the 8. But after that God of his mercy had raysed

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