Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Christopher Cary

[SP11/5, no. 34]

On 5 June 1555 the Privy Council ordered that Cary, John Dee, John Field and Benger should be examined about their confessions concerning the practice of conjuring. 1583, p. 1581.

On 7 June the privy council ordered that Cary, Dee, Field and Benger be examined again about conjuring and witchcraft. 1583, p. 1581.

On 29 August Dee and Cary were released on bond. 1583, p. 1581.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Derick Carver

(1515? - 1555)

Brewer. Martyr.

Derick Carver was born in Dilson by Stockhome in the land of Luke. He lived in Brighthampsted, Sussex. 1563, pp. 1239, 1240, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

He was apprehended with John Launder, Thomas Everson (or Iveson - in 1570) and William Veisy at the end of October 1554 by Edward Gage, whilst at prayer in Carver's house. 1563, pp. 1239-40 1570, pp. 1860-61, 1576, pp. 1592-93, 1583, p. 1680.

He was sent to prison after a letter was sent to Bonner from the marquess of Winchester, now Lord Treasurer, on 8 June 1555. 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

He appeared in the consistory court of 10 June 1555. 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

Foxe records the articles against him and his answers. 1563, p. 1240, 1570, pp. 1861-62, 1576, pp. 1593-94, 1583, pp. 1681-82.

William Paulet was ordered by the Privy Council to send a writ for Carver's execution to the sheriff of Sussex on 12 June 1555 1583, p. 1581.

He made a confession before Bonner. 1563, p. 1240, 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

Carver was burned with John Launder at Lewes in Sussex on 22 July 1555. 1563, p. 1239, 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

Robert Smith told his wife in a letter that Carver had sent her money and in another letter that he was condemned. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Francis Englefield

(1521/22 - 1596)

Catholic exile. High sheriff of Berkshire and Oxfordshire at the death of Henry VIII. Privy councillor, Master of the Rolls and Master of the Court of Wards and Liveries under Mary [DNB; Bindoff, Commons]

Englefield was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Sir Francis Englefield was present at Stephen Gardiner's Paul's Cross sermon of 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

Learning of the madness of John Bolton, Sir Francis ordered him released from Reading goal (1563, pp. 1017-18). [NB: Englefield was also the keeper of Reading goal; see Bindoff, Commons.]

On 28 March 1555, Mary announced to Englefield and three other privy councillors that she was restoring the monastic lands in the crown's possession to the church. 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1467; 1583, p. 1559.

On 29 May 1555, the privy council ordered that Englefield apprehend John Dee and that he search the papers of Dee and Thomas Benger. 1583, pp. 1577-78.

On 5 June 1555, the privy council ordered Englefield to examine Cary, Dee, John Field and Sir Thomas Benger about their having practiced conjuring and witchcraft. 1583, p. 1581.

[Went into exile under Elizabeth and retired to Valladolid. (DNB)]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Covert

(by 1501 - 1558)

MP (1529, 1553, 1554); Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex (1554 - 1555) [Bindoff, Commons ]

The privy council ordered William Paulet to send writs to Covert authorising the burning of Derick Carver. 1583, p. 1581.

[NB: Bindoff identifies Covert as a religious conservative.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Field

(1520 - 1587)

Mathematician and astronomer [DNB]

On 5 June 1555 the privy council ordered that Cary, John Dee, John Field and Benger should be examined about their confessions concerning the practice of conjuring. 1583, p. 1581.

On 7 June the privy council ordered that Cary, Dee, Field and Benger be examined again about conjuring and witchcraft. 1583, p. 1581.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Launder

(1530? - 1555)

Husbandman and martyr. Born and lived in Godstone, Surrey.

John Launder was apprehended with Derick Carver at the end of October 1554 by Edward Gage, while at prayer in Carver's house. 1563, pp. 1239-40, 1570, pp. 1860-61, 1576, pp. 1592-93, 1583, p. 1680.

He appeared to hold prayer meetings at his own house. 1563, p. 1242, 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1593, 1583, p. 1680.

He was sent to Newgate. 1563, p. 1239, 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1593, 1583, p. 1680.

On 8 June 1555 Launder was sent to prison after a letter was sent to Bonner from the marquess of Winchester, now lord treasurer [?], on 8 June 1555. He appeared in the consistory court of 10 June 1555. 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

He made a confession before Bonner. 1563, p. 1240, 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

Robert Smith told his wife in a letter that Launder was condemned. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

Launder sent a piece of Spanish money to Anne Smith. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

Foxe records the articles against him and answers. 1563, p. 1240, 1570, pp. 1861-62, 1576, pp. 1593-94, 1583, pp. 1681-82.

William Paulet was ordered by the privy council on 12 June 1555 to send a writ for John Launder's execution to the sheriff of Sussex. 1583, p. 1581.

He was burned with Derick Carver at Lewes on 22 July 1555. 1563, p. 1239, 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lord Edward North

(1496? - 1564)

1st baron North of Kirtling (DNB ; Bindoff, Commons) Brother of Joan Wilkinson.

North was a supporter of Lady Jane Grey who gained Mary's favor.

He was one of the signatories of a letter from the privy council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, declaring that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir (1570, p. 1658; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, pp. 1406-7).

North was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He was ordered by the privy council to examine Cary, John Dee, John Field and Sir Thomas Benger. 1583, p. 1581

Isabel Malt claimed that Lord North and another nobleman offered her money in exchange for her infant son, hoping to pass the baby off as Mary?s son. 1570, p. 1772; 1576, p. 1513; 1583, p. 1597

Lord Edward North was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir John Bourne

(1518 - 1575)

Secretary of State to Mary; uncle to Bishop Gilbert Bourne of Bath and Wells, [DNB, sub Bourne, Gilbert; Bindoff].

Sir John Bourne led a debate, or rather dinner conversation, with John Feckenham, against Nicholas Ridley while the latter was imprisoned in the Tower (1563, pp. 928-31; 1570, pp. 1589-91; 1576, p 1356-58; and 1583, p. 1426-28).

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Rowland Taylor on 22 January 1555 (1563, pp. 1071-73; 1570, pp. 1696-97; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1521-22).

He was one of the examiners of John Rogers on 28 January 1555 (1563, pp. 1026-28; 1570, pp. 1659-60; 1576, pp. 1416-17; 1583, pp. 1486-87).

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Robert Ferrar on 4 February 1555 (1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1722-23; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, pp. 1553-54).

He was ordered by the privy council to examine Sir Thomas Benger, Cary, John Dee and John Field on 5 and 7 May 1555 (1583, p. 1581).

Bradford was brought to speak to Bonner by the under-marshal of the King's Bench. Talk took place between the lord chancellor, Bonner and John Bradford on 22 January 1555, during which the bishop of Durham, Sir Richard Southwell, Sir Robert Rochester, and Secretary Bourne questioned Bradford's eucharistic doctrine. 1563, pp. 1185-88, 1570, pp. 1782-84, 1576, pp. 1522-23, 1583, pp. 1605-06.

[Back to Top]

Secretary Bourne declared that Bradford had caused much trouble with letters, as had been reported to him by the earl of Derby. 1563, p. 1186, 1570, p. 1783, 1576, p. 1523, 1583, p. 1606.

Bourne asked Bradford if the letters were seditious, but Bradford claimed they were not. 1563, p. 1187, 1570, p. 1783, 1576, p. 1523, 1583, p. 1606.

Sir John Bourne is described by Foxe as the chief stirrer in such cases as that of Bartlett Green's. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1851.

A letter to Bonner by the privy council regarding Green's treason was written on 11 November 1555, but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely, William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. , 1583, pp. 1851-52.

Lord Williams, Lord Chandos, Sir Thomas Bridges and Sir John Browne arrived in Oxford, prior to Cranmer's martyrdom. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Sir John Bourne was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

[Back to Top]

His judges were Portman and Marven who, when they witnessed John Davis's sorry state when he was held before them, agreed with John Bourne that the boy had suffered enough. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Bourne and his wife took Davis home and anointed his wounds but put him away when they realised he would not submit to their doctrine. They were afraid he might have an effect on their son Anthony. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Richard Read

Officer of the Court of Chancery. Alderman of London; JP Essex and Middlesex (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6]

Sir Richard Read was ordered by the privy council to examine Sir Thomas Benger, Cary, John Dee and John Field on 5 and 7 May 1555. 1583, p. 1581.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

George Ambrose was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 21 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Drakes was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Richard Read was told during his examinations of 16 January 1555 that the Spurges, Ambrose and Cavel had been complained of by the parson of the church in Bocking. The priest had complained to Lord Rich who had taken the complaint further. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Cavel was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Richard and Thomas Spurge were examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Tyms was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Commemorations were given to Read at King's College shortly after the exhumation of Bucer, at the commission's command. 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

Read was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Thomas Benger

(d. 1572)

JP, MP (1559). Auditor of Princess Elizabeth's household (1552 - 1558). Master of the Revels, (1560 - 1572) [Bindoff, Commons]

On 29 May 1555, the privy council ordered Sir Frances Englefield to search for papers concerning John Dee or Benger. 1583, pp. 1577-78.

On 5 June 1555 the privy council ordered that Cary, John Dee, John Field and Benger should be examined about their confessions concerning the practice of conjuring. 1583, p. 1581.

On 7 June the privy council ordered that Benger, Cary, Dee and Field be examined again about conjuring and witchcraft. 1583, p. 1581.

[NB: Benger was arrested for having asked John Dee to calculate the horoscopes of Philip, Mary and Elizabeth. He was released by the end of May 1555. His will reveals protestant sentiments, expressing his hope that he was one of the elect and denying the efficacy of good works (Bindoff, Commons)].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Beard

A tailor in Fleet Street, London. Marian informer against protestants. [Bridgen, London and the Reformation, pp. 454, 569, 626.]

Beard visited John Cardmaker in Newgate prison a few days before Cardmaker's execution and tried to persuade him to recant; Cardmaker refused. 1570, p. 1754; 1576, p. 1498; 1583, p. 1581.

Beard discovered John Small reading from an English Bible to a small group in the house of James Trevisam. He denounced the group to the authorities and had them arrest. 1570, p. 1843, 1576, p. 1577, 1583, p. 1665.

George Tankerfield's wife was tricked by Beard. She later attacked him. George Tankerfield was then taken to Newgate by Beard and Simon Ponder. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Thomas Beard died wretchedly. 1563, p. 1705, 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

[NB: Beard tried to obtain banned catholic books during Edward VI's reign; see Brigden, London, p. 454].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Iveson

(d. 1555)

Born in Chichester. Carpenter. Of Godstone, Surrey. Martyr.

William Paulet was ordered by the Privy Council to send a writ for Thomas Iveson's execution to the sheriff of Sussex on 12 June 1555. 1583, p. 1581.

Thomas Iveson was apprehended with Derick Carver at the end of October 1554 by Edward Gage, while at prayer in Carver's house. 1563, pp. 1239-40 1570, pp. 1860-61, 1576, pp. 1592-93, 1583, p. 1680.

Iveson was burned in the same month as Carver and Launder. 1563, p. 1243, 1570, p. 1863, 1576, p. 1594, 1583, p. 1682.

He gave answers to Bonner in July 1555. 1563, pp. 1243-44, 1570, p. 1863, 1576, pp. 1594-95, 1583, pp. 1682-83.

Robert Smith told his wife in a letter that Iveson had sent her money and in another letter that Iveson was condemned. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

Iveson sent money to Anne, Katherine Smith and Anne's mother. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

[Foxe also refers to him as Thomas 'Everson' and 'Juison'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Paulet

(1483? - 1572)

Marquess of Winchester (1551 - 1572) [DNB]

William Paulet signed a royal dispensation of 5 August 1550 which permitted Hooper to be consecrated without having to wear vestments. 1563, p. 1050; 1570, p. 1676; 1576, p. 1403 [recte 1430]; 1583, p. 1504. [Paulet signed as 'W. Wiltshire', being earl of Wiltshire at the time].

He presided over the treason trial and condemnation of Sir Andrew Dudley, Sir John Gates, Sir Henry Gates and Sir Thomas Palmer on 19 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He attended Thomas Watson's Paul's Cross sermon of 20 August 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Paulet was present at Stephen Gardiner's Paul's Cross sermon of 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

On 28 March 1555, Mary announced to Paulet and three other privy councillors that she was restoring the monastic lands in the crown's possession to the church. 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1476; 1583, p. 1559.

On 16 May 1555 the privy council ordered Paulet to send Thomas Ross to John Hopton, and to commit Stephen Appes to Bedlam, if reports of his madness were true. 1583, p. 1577.

On 26 May 1555 the privy council ordered that that Paulet confer with Bishop Bonner and the Middlesex JPs about where convicted heretics were to be executed. 1583, p. 1577.

On 28 May 1555 the Privy Council instructed Paulet to provide money for ambassadors carrying news of the (anticipated) safe delivery of Mary's child to various foreign monarchs. 1583, p. 1577.

On 12 June 1555 the privy council ordered Paulet to send writs for the executions of Derick Carver, Thomas Iveson and John Launder to the sheriff of Sussex. 1583, p. 1581.

Derick Carver was sent to prison after a letter was sent to Bonner from the marquess of Winchester, then lord treasurer, on 8 June 1555. 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

Paulet wrote to Feckenham, the dean of St Paul's. 1563, p. 1239, 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

[Also referred to as 'Marquis of Winchester' and 'W. Wiltshire']

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Stainings [Steyning]
NGR: TQ 185 106

A borough market town and parish in the hundred of Steyning, rape of Bramber, county of Sussex. 24 miles east by north from Chichester. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Chichester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
1605 [1581]

Queene Mary. The beliefe and confeßion of Iohn Warne Martyr. A note of Cardmaker.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. May.bloud, shall receiue euerlasting damnation with the deuill and hys angels.

I beleeue in the holy ghost.  

Commentary  *  Close

This point establishes that Warne, unlike some Marian protestants, believed in the Trinity. Again, Foxe would have been happy to record Warne's orthodoxy on this issue.

I do beleue that the holy ghost is God, the third person in Trinitie, in vnitie of the Godhed equal with the father & the sonne, geuen through Christ in inhabite our spirites, by which we are made to feele and vnderstand the great power, vertue, & louing kindnes of Christ our lord. For he illumineth, quickneth, and certifieth our spirit, that by him we are sealed vp vnto the day of redemption, by whom we are regenerate and made new cretures, so that by hym and through hym, we do receyue all the aboundāt goodnes promised vs in Iesus Christ.

[Back to Top]

The holy Catholike Church.

MarginaliaThe Church.This is an holy number of Adams posteritie, elected, gathered, washed, and purified by the bloud of the Lambe from the beginning of the world, and is dispersed through the same, by the tiranny of Gog & Magog, that is to say, the Turke and his tiranny, and Antichrist, otherwyse named the Bish. of Rome and hys aungels, as this day also doth teach.

[Back to Top]

The Communion of Saints.

Which most holy congregation (beyng as Paule teacheth, builded vppon the foundation of the Apostles and Prophetes, Christ beyng the head corner stone) though it be by the tyranny of Satan and his ministers persecuted, some by imprisonment, some by death, and some by other afflictions & painful torments: yet doth it remayne in one perfect vnitie both in faith and fellowship: which vnity is knit in an vnspeakable knot, as well of them which are departed from this mortal life, as of them which now be liuyng, and hereafter shall be in the same, and so shall continue vntill they all do meete in the kyngdome, where the head Iesus Christ, with all hys holy members (of which number thorough Christ I assuredly beleeue that I am one) shall be fully complete, knit, and vnited together for euermore.

[Back to Top]

The forgeuenesse of sinnes.

MarginaliaRemission only through Christ.I do beleeue that my sinnes and all their sinnes which do rightly beleeue the holy Scripture, are forgeuen onely thorough that Iesus Christ, of whom onely I do professe that I haue my whole and full saluation and redemption, which S. Paule saith, commeth not through our workes and deseruyngs, but freely by grace, lest any should boast hymselfe. Thorough the bloud of his Crosse all thyngs in heauen and earth are reconciled, and set at peace wyth the Father, without him no heauenly lyfe is geuen, nor sinne forgeuen.

[Back to Top]

The resurrection of the body.

MarginaliaResurrection.I do beleue, that by the same my sauiour Christ, I, and all men shall rise againe from death: for he, as Paul sayth, is risen agayne frō the dead, and is become the first fruits of them which sleepe. For by a man came death, and by a man commeth the resurrection from death. This man is Christ, through the power of whose resurrection, I beleue that we all shall rise agayne in these our bodyes: the elect clothed with immortalitie to liue with Christ for euer: the reprobate also shall rise immortall to liue with the deuill and his angels in death euerlasting.

[Back to Top]

And the life euerlasting.

Through the same Iesus & by none other, I am sure to haue life euerlasting. He onely is the way and entrance into the kingdome of heauen. MarginaliaIohn. 3.For so God loued the world, that he did geue his onely sonne Iesus Christ, to the ende that so many as do beleue in him, might haue euerlasting lyfe. MarginaliaLife and Saluation onely by fayth in Christ.The which I am sure to possesse so soone as I am dissolued, & departed out of this tabernacle, & in the last day shall both body and soule possesse the same for euer: to the which God graunt all men to come,

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaTwo sacraments of the new Testament.I beleue that the sacramentes, that is to say, of Baptisme and of the Lordes supper are seales of Gods moste mercyfull promises towardes mankind. In Baptisme, as by the outward creature of water I am washed from the filthines which hangeth on my flesh: so do I assuredly beleue, þt I am by Christes bloud washed cleane frō my sins, through which I haue sure confidence of my certaine saluation. In the partaking of the Lordes supper, as I receyue the substance of bread & wyne (the nature of which is to strengthen the body,) so do I by faith receyue the redemption wrought in Christes body broken on the crosse, life by his death, resurrection by his resurrection, and in summe, all that euer Christ in his body suffered for my saluation, to the strengthening of my faith in the same. And I beleeue that God hath appointed the eatyng & drinking of the creatures of bread and wine in his holy supper according to his word, to mooue and stirre vp my mynd to beleue these articles aboue written.

[Back to Top]

This is my faith: this I do beleue, and I am contentby Gods grace to confirme and seale the truth of the same with my bloud.

By me Iohn Warne.

¶ A letter of Iohn Cardmaker to a certaine friend of his.

MarginaliaA letter of M. Cardmaker to a certaine frend of his.the peace of God be with you.

You shall right well perceiue, that I am not gone backe as some men do report me, but as ready to geue my lyfe, as any of my brethren that are gone before me,  

Commentary  *  Close
Cardmaker's Letters

By this time, Cardmaker had clearly decided not to recant and was anxious to scupper reports that he had recanted. This letter enables Foxe to make it seem as though Cardmaker had never recanted.

although by a pollicie I haue a little prolonged it, and that for the best, as already it appeareth vnto me, and shortly shall appeare vnto all. That day that I recant any poynt of doctrine, I shall suffer twenty kyndes of death, the Lord beyng myne assistance, as I doubt not, but he wil. Commend me to my friend, and tell hym no lesse. This the Lord strengthen you, me, and all his elect. My riches and pouertie is as it was woont to be, and I haue learned to reioyce in pouertie, as well as in riches, for that count I now to bee very riches. Thus fare ye well in Christ. Salute all my brethren in my name. I haue conferred with some of my aduersaries, learned men, and I finde that they be but Sophistes and shadowes.

[Back to Top]
¶ A note concerning M. Cardmaker.

MarginaliaA note concerning talke betweene M. Cardmaker and Beard a promoter.MAister Cardmaker beyng condemned, & in Newgate one Beard a Promooter came to him two or thre dais before he was burned, and said vnto him: Sir, I am sent vnto you by the Counsaile, to knowe whether ye will recant or no?

Cardmaker. From which Counsaile are ye come? I thinke ye are not come, nor yet sent from the Queenes counsaile, but rather from the commissioners, vnto whō (as I suppose) ye belong. And where as ye would know, whether I wil recant or no, thus, I pray you, report of me to those whom ye said, sent you. I know you are a Tailor by your occupation, and haue endeuoured your selfe to be a cunning workeman, and therby to get your liuing: so I haue bene a preacher these xx. yeres, and euer since that God by his great mercy hath opened myne eyes to see hys eternal truth, I haue by his grace endeuoured my selfe to call vpō him, to geue me the true vnderstanding of his holy word, and I thanke hym for his great mercy, I hope I haue discharged my conscience in the settyng forth of the same, to that little talent that I haue receiued.

[Back to Top]

Beard. Yea sir, but what say you to the blessed Sacrament of the aultar?

Card. I say and marke it well, that Christ the nyght before hys bitter passion, ordeyned the holy and blessed Communion, & hath geuen commandement, that his death should be preached before the receiuyng therof, in the remēbrance of his body broken, and his precious bloud shed for the forgeuenes of our sinnes, to as many as faithfully beleeue and trust in hym.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe sentēce & iudgemēte of M. Cardmaker touching the sacrament.And furthermore, to conclude the matter briefly wyth hym, he asked of him, whether the Sacrament he spake of, had a beginnyng, or no? Whereunto when he had graunted and affirmed the same to be, then maister Cardmaker againe thus inferred thereupon: If the Sacrament (said he) as you confesse, haue a beginning, and an ending, then it cannot bee God: for God hath no beginnyng nor endyng, and so willyng hym well to note the same, he departed from hym.

[Back to Top]
Iune. An. 1555.

 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Addenda: ref page 85, line 17 from the bottom

The [next] three paragraphs are extracts from the Privy Council Book.

The 5. day  
Commentary  *  Close
Events of June 1555

All of the material on the incidents of June 1555 first appear in the 1583 edition and were copied out of the privy council register. Foxe's copy of all of these entries survives in his papers papers: BL, Harley 419, fol. 133v.

For the material for 5 June 1555, see APC V, p. 143. The person whom Foxe identifies as 'D' is John Dee, later famous as a mathematician and occult philosopher. Foxe's reasons for disguising Dee's name are discussed in Roberts, p. 49.

M. Secretary Bourne, the M. of the Roles Sir Frances Englefield, Sir Richard Read and Doctor Hughes, authorising them or two or three of them at the least, to proceed to further examination of Benger, Cary, D.  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 85, line 14 from the bottom

The Council Book says, "oon John Dye dwelling in London." Dee is again mentioned by Foxe June 5th: but the Council Book has the following intermediate notice of Dee and his companions, under date of June 1st:

"A lettre to the Mr. of the Rolles to receive into his custody oon Christopher Cary, and to kepe him in his howse without conference with any personne saving such as he speciallie trusteth, until Mr. Secretary Bourne and Mr. Englefelde shall repair thither for his further examination.

"A lik lettre to the Chief Justice of the Common Place with oon John dee.

"A lik lettre to the Bishop of London with on John Felde.

"A Lettre to the Warden of the Flete to receive Sir Thomas Benger, and to keep him in safe Warde without having conference with any. Robert Hutton is appointed, being his servaunte, tattende upon hym, and to be shut up with him."

This Dee was the famous John Dee, otherwise Dr. Dee: there is a full account of him in the "Biographia Britannica," and Cooper's "Athenæ Cantabrigienses." He was educated at St. John's College, Cambridge, but became fellow of Trinity College. He became M.A. in 1548, and went that summer to Louvain, where he was made LL.D.; he returned home in 1551. He was an eminent mathematician, astrologer, and magician. Having been discovered at the beginning of Mary's reign to be on friendly terms with some of the Princess Elizabeth's confidential servants, he was accused to the Council of plotting by magic against Queen Mary's life; and was accordingly thrown into Newgate and tried, but acquitted of this charge, and released August 29th, 1555. He was bedfellow to Bartlet Green, and having been observed to shew sympathy for him when carried away to his execution, was put under the surveillance of Bonner on a suspicion of heresy: hence he appears subsequently in the examinations of Philpot, where it was the object of his enemies to test his soundness in the Romish faith, and his allegiance to the papal church: he is called ... "the great conjurer." He was born in 1527, and died in 1608. It is observable that after the Latin Edition of 1559, and the English of 1563, Foxe has (for whatever reason) disguised the name of Dr. Dee, in every instance.

[Back to Top]
and Field, vppon such poynts as they shall gather out of their former confessions, touchyng their lewd & vayne practises of calculing or coniuryng, presently sent vnto thē with the sayd letters. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 85, line 13 from the bottom

The Council Booke says: "Upon suche poynts as by their wisdomes they shall gather out of their former Confessions touching their Lewde and Vayne practices of calculing and conjuring, presently sent unto them with the said lettres, willing and requiring them further, as they shall by their Examinacions prove any other man or woman touched in this or in the like matters, to cause them to be forthwith apprehended and committed, to be further ordered according to justice."

[Back to Top]

[Back to Top]

The 7. day  

Commentary  *  Close

See APC V, pp. 143-44. The person whom Foxe identifies as 'D' is John Dee, later famous as a mathematician and occult philosopher. Foxe's reasons for disguising Dee's name are discussed in Roberts, p. 49.

there was another letter to sir Iohn Tregonwel, willing hym to ioyne in commission with the said L. North, and others abouenamed, about the examination of the said parties & others, for coniuring & witchcraft. And the 29. of August  
Commentary  *  Close

See APC V, p. 176.

Cary and D. were set at liberty vpon bands for their good abearyng vntil Christmas after. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 85, line 5 from the bottom

The Council Book reads thus: -

"At Greenwich the xxix of August,

"A Lettre to the Mr. of the Rolles to cause Carye remayning in his Custodie to be bound for his good abearing betwixt this and Christmas next and fourthcoming, whenne he shalbe called; and thereuppon to set hym at libertie.

"A like lettre to the Bishop of London for John Dee.

"A like lettre to the King's Marshall for oon Butts."

There is the following notice in the Council Book, under July vii, respecting Benger: -

"A Lettre to the Warden of the Flete to let Sir Thomas Benger have the liberty of the Flete, and his wife to come to him at tymes convenient."

[Back to Top]

The 12. day  

Commentary  *  Close

See APC V, p. 147.

a letter was sent to the L. Treasurer, to cause Writs to be made to the Shirife of Sussex, for þe burnyng and executing of Dirike a Brewer, at Lewes, and other two, the one at Stainings, the other at Chichester. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 85, bottom

The Council Book reads "Steynyngs."

The 23. of Iune  

Commentary  *  Close

See APC V, p. 150.

a letter was sent to Boner, to examine a report geuen to the counsail of 4. parishes within þe Soken  
Commentary  *  Close

Confusingly this is a term for a number of different local jurisdictions and administrative units. In this case, the reference is to a subdivision of a diocese.

of Essex, that should still vse the English seruice, and to punish the offenders if any such be. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 86, line 4

The Council Book adds: - "and to send some of his Chapleins into that shire to preach there."

The
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield