Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the TextCommentary on the Woodcuts
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Barwick

(fl. 1543 - 1565)

B.A. (1548/49). Clerk of Magdalen College, 1543 - 1553, chaplain (1553 - 1554). MA (1556), fellow of Trinity College, Oxford (1556 - 1565). Dean of Trinity (1556) (Foster). Apparently resigned his Trinity fellowship in 1565. (See J R Bloxam, A Register of.. Magdalen College, 7 vols [Oxford, 1853-81], II, p. 38.)

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Not long before Julins Palmer's death, Barwick, an old acquaintance of his, tried to reason with him and warned him of the fire. 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

Julins Palmer disputed with Barwick, MA, of Magdalen College, Oxford, who believed Palmer's doctrine would change if threatened with burning. 1583, p. 2141.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mary of Hungary

(1505 - 1558)

Sister of Charles V, regent of the Low Countries (1530 - 1555).

Mary of Hungary paid English mariners in Antwerp one hundred pistoles for firing guns to celebrate the (inaccurate) news that Mary Tudor had given birth to a son. 1570, pp. 1772; 1576, pp. 1513; 1583, p. 1596

 
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Nicholas Harpsfield

(1519? - 1575)

Archdeacon of Canterbury; vicar-general of London. Author of the most important contemporary attack on the Acts and Monuments. Younger brother of John Harpsfield [DNB]

Nicholas Harpsfield discussed the sacrament and ceremonies with Thomas Hawkes on 30 June 1554, but soon gave up hope of changing Hawke's opinions. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1507; 1583, p. 1590

Harpsfield took depositions regarding John Tooley's heretical speech from the gallows. 1563, p. 1144

He examined Thomas Wattes on 4 May 1555 and he urged Wattes to recant. Wattes refused, telling Harpsfield that his efforts were in vain. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, 1596

Nicholas Harpsfield is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Master Collins (comissary), in Thornden's house. Talk took place between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 21 May Bland appeared in the chapter house before Nicholas Harspfield. 1563, pp. 1221-23, 1570 p. 1846, 1576 p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

George Brodbridge was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August for having refused to say confession to a priest. 1563, p. 1273. The examination is referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Robert Streater was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

James Tutrye was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

John Webbe was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

Harpsfield is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Harpsfield took part in Richard Woodman's fifth and sixth examinations. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-94, 1576, pp. 1890-93, 1583, pp. 1999-2002.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on the condemnation of five martyrs at Canterbury so that they could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Scot

An innkeeper of Chelmsford.

Thomas Hawkes, Thomas Wattes and other Marian martyrs were lodged in Scot's inn on the night of 9 June 1555 before their executions. 1563, p. 1166; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1513; 1583, p. 1596

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Hawkes

(d. 1555)

Gentleman and martyr. Fellow prisoner of Robert Smith.

Thomas Hawkes was examined by Bishop Bonner on 8 February 1555; he was condemned by Bonner on 8 February 1555. 1570, p. 1705; 1576, p. 1456; 1583, p. 1529.

Hawkes sent Anne Smith money. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

Foxe describes Hawkes' life and character; Hawkes served in the household of the earl of Oxford (1563, p. 1161; 1570, p. 1758; 1576,pp. 1501-1550 [recte 1502]; 1583, p. 1585).

Hawkes refused to allow his infant son to be baptized in a catholic service. The earl of Oxford reported this to Bishop Bonner (1563, p. 1162; 1570, p. 1758; 1576, p. 1550 [recte 1502]; 1583, p. 1585).

Hawkes was examined informally by Bonner (1563, pp. 1148-51; 1570, pp. 1758-60; 1576, pp. 1550 [recte 1502]-1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, pp. 1585-87).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and and John Harpsfield (1563, pp. 1151-52; 1570, pp. 1760-1; 1576, pp. 1551 [recte 1503]-1504; 1583, pp. 1587-88).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and John Bird (1563, pp. 1152-53; 1570, pp. 1761-62; 1576, pp. 1504-05;1583, p. 1588).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and Feckenham (1563, pp. 1153-54; 1570, p. 1762; 1576, p. 1505; 1583,pp. 1588-89).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and William Chedsey (1563, pp. 1154-55; 1570, pp. 1763-64; 1576, pp. 1505-06; 1583, pp. 1589-90).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and Bonner on 29 June 1554 (1563, pp. 1155-56; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1506; 1583, p. 1590).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and Bonner on 30 June 1554 (1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, pp. 1507-08; 1583, p. 1590).

A conversation took place between Hawkes and Bonner on 1 July 1554 (1563, pp. 1156-57; 1570, pp. 1764-65; 1583, p. 1590).

A formal examination of Hawkes was held on 3 September 1554 (1563, pp. 1157-58; 1570, pp. 1765-66; 1576, pp. 1507-08; 1583, pp. 1590-91).

Hawkes was examined by Bishop Bonner on 8 February 1555 and condemned by Bonner on 8 February 1555 (1570, pp. 1705 and 1766; 1576, pp. 1456 and 1508; 1583, pp. 1529 and 1591-92).

Hawkes dined and prayed with Thomas Wattes and other Marian martyrs on the night of 9 June 1555, when they were all detained at an inn at Chelmsford, awaiting execution (1563, p. 1166; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p.1513; 1583, p. 1596).

Foxe describes the martyrdom of Hawkes (1563, p. 1162; 1570, pp. 1766-67; 1576, pp. 1508-09; 1583, pp. 1592-93).

Hawkes sent a letter to a congregation (1563, pp. 1558-59; 1570, pp. 1767-68; 1576, pp. 1509-10; 1583, p. 1593).

Hawkes sent a Letter to his wife (1563, pp. 1159-60; 1570, pp. 1768-69; 1576, p. 1510; 1583, pp. 1593-94).

Hawkes sent a letter to Clement Throgmorton (1570, p. 1769; 1576, pp. 1510-11; 1583, p. 1594).

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Barwick

Hertfordshire

OS grid ref: TL 385 195

1620 [1596]

Q. Mary. The Martyrdome of Thomas Wattes. Queene Maryes childe.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. Iune.To the 12. he answered, that al which before he confessed to be true, is also true: and all that he hath denied to true, he denieth againe to be true, and beleueth the same to be according to such things as he hath confessed.

By me Tho. Wattes.

An other appearance of Thomas Wattes in the Consistorie. 
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The accounts of Wats's appearance in Consistory court, along with the letter from the Essex justices, and the articles objected against him with his answers, are taken from official documents, probably a court book, which is now lost.

MarginaliaTho. Wattes agayne appeareth in the consistory.THese Articles thus propounded and answeared, the bishop commaunded him to appeare again in the same place at 3. of the clocke in the after noone, vppon the same day. At which houre being brought thither by his keeper, the Bishop beganne with him in this wise: MarginaliaThe bishops wordes to Thomas Wattes..Wattes, you know what I said vnto you to day, and what I appoynted vnto you at this time. The time is nowe come: waigh and consider with your selfe, that you are but a man: and allbeit that yee will wilfully cast away your body, yet cast not so away your soule, but while yee haue time, retourne and confesse the truth.

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MarginaliaThe aunswere of Wattes. Whereunto Thomas Wattes answered and sayde: I am weary to liue in such idolatry as ye would haue me to liue in. Vpon which aunswere the bishop caused his articles againe to be read. He thereto answered as before, and farther subscribed the same with his owne hand.

An other appearance before D. Harpsfield. 
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The accounts of Wats's appearance in Consistory court, along with the letter from the Essex justices, and the articles objected against him with his answers, are taken from official documents, probably a court book, which is now lost.

MarginaliaAn other appearaunce before D. Harpsfield. Marginaliawattes submitteth him to the lawe, but not to the Popes lawe.THe bishop, after many perswasions to cause him to recant, willed him to depart as then, and to come againe on Saterday at 8. of the clocke in the morning. Where (the Bishop being absent) D. Nicholas Harpesfielde, as then being his deputie, 

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Nicholas Harpsfield was the archdeacon of Canterbury, but he was also the vicar-general of the diocese of London. In Wats's case, he is acting in the latter capacity.

did sit and earnestly exhorted him to deny his opinions. To whome in the ende he answeared.

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Wel, ye haue a law to condemne me, and I submit my selfe to the law: but not to the lawes of the Church (as you call it.) And farther I doe affirme, and will stande to mine answeres that I haue made.

Wherupon D. Harpsfield willed him to appeare there againe vpon friday, being the 10. day of the same month of May. MarginaliaThomas Wattes priuately appeareth againe before the Byshop.Vppon which day the bishop priuately sent for the sayd Thomas Wattes into his chamber, and there wyth many faire promises, tempted and tried him, whether hee would reuoke hys errours (as he then termed them.) But Wattes aunsweared hym in this sorte: MarginaliaWattes aunswere to the Byshop.I will not beleeue your Church, neither the Romish Churche, and therefore you doe but labour in vaine thus to trauaile with me. He was here vpon againe dismissed for that time, vntil friday the 17. day of May, and then commaunded to appeare in the Consistorie: whych commandement he obeyed, & hauing the accustomed former Articles ministred vnto him, made then such answeres as before.

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Thomas Wattes brought againe to the consistorie. 
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of Wats's appearance in Consistory court, along with the letter from the Essex justices, and the articles objected against him with his answers, are taken from official documents, probably a court book, which is now lost.

THus being tost to and fro, from day to day, and houre to houre: he was at the last, the 18. day of the month of May, brought into the consistorie, where firste was made a briefe recitall of all the former processe: and there the sayd Wattes being (by the byshop and others) willed to deny his profession, made this final answer: MarginaliaThe finall aunswere of Thomas Wattes.God kepe me from the doctrine that ye wold haue me to come vnto, which ye haue now declared. And I beseech God þt I may perseuer in that that I haue done, for I wil stand to mine answers.

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MarginaliaSentence of condemnation agaynst Thomas Wattes.The Byshop perceiuing his faire flattering promises nothing to preuaile (& hauing no great store of other reasons to perswade with) put forth his last and strongest argument of condemnation. Which being ended, he was deliuered to the sheriffes of London, & by them was sent to Newgate, where he remained vntil the 9. day of Iune,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 123, line 13

Wats is spoken of by Robert Smith, June 10th (which was a Monday in 1555) as then "gone to death."

or as some record, to the 22. of May: at what time he was caried vnto Chelmesforde, and there was brought to Scots house, keeping then an Inne at Chelmesforde, where, as they were eating meat with Hauks and the rest that came downe to their burning, they prayed together both afore and after their meate.

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MarginaliaThe farewel of Thomas Wattes to his wyfe & 6. childrenThen Wats went and praied priuately to himself, and afterward came to his wife and his 6. childrē being there, and said these words in effect: Wife, and my good children, I must now depart from you. Therfore hence forth know I you no more, but as the Lord hath geuen you vnto me, so I geue you againe vnto the Lord, whom I charge you see you do obey, and feare him: and beware yee turne not to this abhominable papistrie, against the which I shall anone (by Gods grace) geue my bloude. Let not the murthering of Gods Saintes cause you to relent, but take occasion thereby to be the stronger in the Lords quarel, and I doubt not but he wil be a mercifull father vnto you. All these and suche like woordes spake he vnto them, and they

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vnto him, of whome two (as it is sayd) offered to be burnt wyth him. In the ende he badde them farewell, and kissed them all, and was caried to the fire.

The burning of Thomas Wattes, Martyr. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Tho. Watttes, at Chelmsford. Anno. 1555. Iune. 10.

woodcut [View a larger version]

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This is one of the small cuts introduced in 1570, which saw repeated use. It was reused four more times after this appearance in, 1583, at pages 1683, 1704, 2021, 2045, and is one of the two small woodcuts (see also small cut [i]) that, unlike the majority, show martyrs in an unlit pyre with pikemen in the background. The curious lack of the top framing line in this instance, indicating that the block was shortened, also suggests this was some kind of exception in the series.

At the stake, after he had kissed it, he spake to my Lord Rich, these or the like words: MarginaliaThe wordes of Thomas Wattes to the L. Rich.My Lord sayth he, beware, beware, for you doe against your owne conscience herein, and without you repent, the Lord will reuenge it: For you are the cause of this my death. 

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As the researches of Brett Usher have revealed, Lord Rich had been the patron of a number of evangelical preachers in Essex during the reign of Edward VI, thus explaining Wats's words to Lord Rich. (See the article by Brett Usher in John Foxe at Home and Abroad, ed. by David Loades[forthcoming]).

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Concerning the childebed of Queene Mary, as it was rumoured among the people. 
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Queen Mary's False Pregnancy

All of the material Foxe ever printed on Mary's false pregnancy first appeared in the 1563 edition. In the 1570 edition Foxe deleted some material, most notably William Forest's poems. The account was printed without alteration in the 1576 and 1583 editions. The chief source for this material was London gossip; interestingly, gossip centred on the Aldersgate neighbourhood of John Day's printshop, where all four of the first editions of the Acts and Monuments were printed.

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MarginaliaThe Childbirth of Q. Mary.LOng perswasion had bene in England with great expectation, for the space of halfe a yeare or more, that the Queene was conceiued wt childe. This report was made by the Queenes Phisitions, & other nie about the Court: so that diuers were punished for saying the contrary. And commaundement was geuen, that in all churches supplication and prayers should be made for the Queenes good deliuerie: the certificate whereof ye may read before in the letter of the Counsell sent to Boner, pag. 1405. And also the same moreouer may appeare by prouision made before in the Act of Parliament for the childe. 

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The letter Foxe refers to was printed in Book X.

pag. 1410.  
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The poems of William Forrest were dropped from the 1570 edition, probably due to the need to save paper. Foxe, however, never reprinted these poems in later editions.

 
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Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 123, bottom

The queen was actually reported in May following to be delivered of a prince. The parish priest of St. Ann's, Aldersgate, went so far as to describe the beauty and fair proportions of the child. Amongst Ellis's Letters, vol. ii. p. 188, occurs a letter from John Hopton, bishop of Norwich, to Lord Sussex, May 3d, 1555, stating that Te Deum had been sung for the happy event in the cathedral and other places in Norwich, and that there had been generall rejoicings in the city and surrounding country: a similar report seems also to have reached Antwerp. (Ellis's Note.)

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MarginaliaRockers and Nurses prouided for Queene Maryes childe. 

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Note that Foxe corrected the month in the 1570 edition.

And now for somuch as in þe beginning of this month of Iune about Whitsontide, the time was thought to be nie, that this young Maister should come into the world, and that midwiues, rockers, nurses, with the cradle & all, were prepared and in a readines, sodēly vpon what cause or occasion it is vncertaine, a certaine vaine rumour was blowne in London of the prosperous deliuerance of the Queene, and the birth of the childe: MarginaliaProcessions and bonfiers in Londō for ioy of the young Prince.In so muche that the Bels were rong, Bonfiers and processions made, not only in the Citie of London, and in most other partes of the realme, but also in the towne of MarginaliaTriumph at Antwarpe for the same.Antwarpe, gunnes were shot off vppon the riuer, by the English shippes, and the Mariners thereof rewarded wyth an hundred pistolettes or Italian crownes by the Ladie Regent, who was the Queene of Hungarie. Such great reioysing and triumph was for the Queenes deliuerie, & that there was a Prince borne. Yea, diuers Preachers, namely one, the Parson of S. Anne within Aldergate, 
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St Anne's was the parish in which John Day's home and printshop were located.

after Procession and Te Deum  
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This is a Latin hymn recited on occasions of thanksgiving.

song, tooke vpon him to describe the proportion of þe child, how faire, howe beautifull, and great a Prince it was, as the like had not bene seene.

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In the middest of this great adoe, there was a simple man (this I speake but vppon information) dwelling wtin 4. miles of Barwicke, that neuer had bene before halfe way to London, whiche sayde concerning the Bonfiers made for Queene Maries childe: Here is a ioyful triūph, but at length al wil not proue worth a messe of potage, 

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See Genesis 25: 29-34.

as in dede in came to passe: For in þe end al proued clean cōtrary, & the ioy and expectations of mē were much deceiued. MarginaliaQ. Maryes childe would not come.For the people were certified, þt the Queene neither was as then deliuered, nor after was in hope to haue any child.

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