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Bury St Edmunds

[St Edmundsbury; Berry; Bery]

West Suffolk

OS grid ref: TL 855 645

Contains a ruined abbey, the shrine of St Edmund

 
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Framlingham, Suffolk
NGR: TM 285 635

Parish in the Hundred of Loes, Suffolk; 18 miles north-east by east from Ipswich. A rectory in the archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich.

Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

 
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Holderness [Holdernesse]

East Riding of Yorkshire

Drained marsh area on the Yorkshire coast

 
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Reading
NGR: SU 173 720

A borough having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Reading, county of Berkshire. 26 miles south-east by south from Abingdon, 39 miles west by south from London. The town comprises the parishes of St Giles, St Lawrence and St Mary, all in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire and Diocese of Salisbury. Each living is a vicarage.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Thetford
NGR: TL 870 830

A borough possessing exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Shropham, county of Norfolk, but partly in the hundred of Lackford, county of Suffolk. 30 miles south-west from Norwich. The borough comprises the parishes of St Cuthbert, St Peter and St Mary the Less, all in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich. St Cuthbert's is a discharged rectory with Holy Trinity annexed; St Peters is a discharged rectory with St Nicholas annexed; St Mary the Less is a perpetual curacy.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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York
NGR: SE 603 523

A city and county of itself, having exclusive jurisdiction; locally in the East Riding of the county of York, of which it is the capital. 198 miles north-north-west from London. The city is the seat of the Archbishop, and comprised originally 33 parishes, reduced by amalgamation to 22; of which 33, 17 were discharged rectories, 10 discharged vicarages, and 6 perpetual curacies; all within the diocese of York.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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163 [140]

K. Codrinus. The Danes comming to Eng. Yorke burned. King Edmund martyred.

yng absent abrod) the king after his dinner (allured wyth the excellency of her beautie) tooke her to a secret chamber, where he forceablye contrarye to her will did rauishe her, MarginaliaExample, what mischiefe commeth by adultery. whereupon she being greatly dismaied, and vexed in her minde, made her moone to her husband returning, of thys violence and iniury receaued. Bruer consulting with his frindes, first went to the king, resigning to his hands, all such seruice and possessions which he did hold of him: that done tooke shipping and sailed into Denmarke, where he had great friends: and had his bringing vp before. There making his mone to Codrinus the king, MarginaliaCodrinus king of Denmarke. desired his aide in reuenging of the great vilany of Osbryght against him and his wife. Codrinus hearing this, and glad to haue some iust quarell to enter that land: leuied an army with al spede: & preparing all things necessary for the same, sendeth foorth Inguar and Hubba two brethren his chief Captaines, MarginaliaInguar and Hubba captaynes of the Danes. with an innumerable multitude of Danes into England. who first arriuing at Holdernesse, there brent vp the country, & killed without mercy both men, women, and childrē, whō they could lay hāds vpon. Then marching toward York, entred their battaile, with the foresayde Osbryght, where he with the most part of his armye was slaine. And so the Danes entred the possession of the Citie of Yorke. Some other say, and is by the most part of storye writers recorded, that the chiefe cause of the comming of Inguar & Hubba with the Danes, MarginaliaAn other cause of the comming of the Danes. was to reuenge king Edmund reygnyng vnder the Westsaxons ouer the Eastangles in Nothfolke and Southfolk: for the murdering of a certaine Dane being father to Inguar and Hubba which was falselye imputed to king Edmund. The story is thus told.

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A certaine noble man of the Danes of the kings stock called Lothebrocus father to Inguar and Hubba MarginaliaLothbroke father to Inguar, and Hubba. entring vppon a time with his hauke into a certaine schaffe or cockebote alone: by chaunce through tempest was driuen with his hauke to the coast of Nothfolke named Rodhā, where he being found and detained was presented vnto the king. The king vnderstanding his parentage, & seing his case: enterteined him in his court accordingly. And euery daye more and more perceiued his actiuities, and great dexteritie in hunting & hauking, bare speciall fauour vnto him. In so much that the kinges faukener, or maister of game, bearing priuy enuy against him, MarginaliaWhat miserable enuy worketh. secretly as they were hūting together in a woode, did murther him, & threw him in a bush. This Lothebroke, being murthered, within two or three daies began to be missed in the kinges house: of whō no tidings could be heard, but onely by a dogge or spaniel of his, MarginaliaMurther will out. which continuing in the wood with the corps of his maister, at sondry times came and fauned vpon the king: so long that at length they folowing the trase of the hound were brought to the place where Lothebroke laye. Wherevpō inquisition made, at length by certeine circumstances of words and other euidences, it was knowne how & by whom he was murthered, that was by the kings huntesman named Berike. Who thereupon being conuicted, was set into the same bote of Lothebroke, alone and without any takeling to driue by seas, either to be saued by the weather or to be drowned in the deepe. And as it chaunced Lothebroke from Dennemarke to be driued to Northfolke, so it happened that from Northfolke he was caried into Denmarke. Where the bote of Lothebroke being well knowen, hands were laid vpon him, & inquisition made of the party. In fine in his torments, to saue himselfe, he vttered an vntruth of king Egmund, saying, that the king had put him to death in the country of Northfolke. Wherupon grudge first was conceiued, thē an army appointed, & great multitude sent into England, to reuenge that fact: where first they arriuing in Northumberland, destroyed (as is sayd) those parties first. From thence sayling into Northfolke they exercised the like tyranny there, vpon the inhabitaūts therof, especially vpon the innocent prince, & blessed marter of God, king Edmund. Cōcerning the farther declaration wherof, hereafter shal follow (Christ our Lord, so permitting) more to be spoken, as place and obseruation of time and yeares, shall require.

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MarginaliaK. Ethelwulphe deceaseth. In the meane seasō, king Ethelwulphe in this chapiter here presently touched, when he had chased þe foresaid Danes (as is aboue rehearsed from place to place, causing thē to take the Sea, he in the meane while departeth him selfe both from land and life: leauing behinde him foure sons, which reigned euery one in his order, after the discease of their father. The names of whom were Ethelbaldus, Ethelbrightus, Ethelredus, and Aluredus.

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¶ King Ethelbalde.

KIng Ethelbald the eldest sonne of Ethelwulfe, succeeding his father in the prouince of Westsaxe: and Ethelbright in the prouince of Kent: reigned both togither, the termeof v. yeares, one with the other. MarginaliaAn. 857. Of the which two, Ethelbald the first left this infamie, behinde him in storyes, for marrying and lying with his stepmother, wife to hys owne father named Iudith. After these two MarginaliaKing Ethelbald. K. Ethelbright. succeded Ethelred, the thirde sonne, who in his time was so encombred with the Danes, brusting in on euery side: especiallye about Yorke, (which Citie they then spoyled and brent vp) that he in one yeare stoode in ix. battailes against them, wt the helpe of Alured his brother. In the beginning of thys Kinges reigne, MarginaliaAn. 867. the Danes landed in East Englande, or Northfolke & Southfolke. But (as Fabian writeth) they were compelled to forsake that country, and so toke again shipping, and sayled Northward, and landed in Northūberlande: where they were met of the Kinges then there reigning, called Osbright, and Ella, which gaue to them a strong fight. But notwithstanding the Danes, with help of such as inhabited the country, wanne the City of York, and helde it a certaine season as is aboue foretouched. MarginaliaKing Etheldred. Yorke burned by the Danes.

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In the reigne of this Ethelred, the Northumberlanders rebelling against the king, thought to recouer again the former state of their kingdome out of the Westsaxons hand, by reason of which discord (as happeneth in al lāds where dissention is) the strength of the Englishe nation was thereby not a litle weakned, and the Danes the more thereby preuailed. MarginaliaWhat discord doth in a commō wealth.

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About the latter time of the reigne of this Etheldred. which was about the yeare of our Lord. 870. MarginaliaAn. 870. certayne of the foresaide Danes being thus possessed of þe north country: after their cruel persecution and murther done there, (as partly is touched before) tooke shipping frō thence, intending to saile toward the Eastangles, who by the way vpon the sea, met with a flot of Danes: whereof the Captaines or leaders were named Inguar & Hubba. Who ioyning altogether in one counsel, made al one course, & lastly landed in East England, or Northfolke, & in proces of time came to Thetford. Thereof hearing Edmund, then vnder king of that prouince: MarginaliaS. Edmund king of Eastangles. assembled an host, that gaue to them battall. But Edmund and his company was forced to forsake the field, & the king with a few persons fled unto the castle of Frammingham, whō the Danes pursued. But he in short while after, yelded himselfe to the persecution of the Danes: aunswering in this maner to þe messenger, that told him in the name of Inguar Prince of the Danes: MarginaliaThe message of the Danes to K. Edmund. which most victoriously (saith he) was come with innumerable legions, subduing both by sea and land manye nations vnto him: & so now arriued in those parts, requireth him likewise to submit himself, yelding to him his hid treasures, and such other goods of his auncetors, and so to reign vnder him, which thing if he would not do, he shold (said he) be iudged vnworthy both of life & reigne. Edmūd hearing this proud message of þe Pagane, consulted wyth certayne of his fryends: and amongest other, with one of his bishops being thē his Secretary, who seyng the present daunger of the king: gaue him counsell to yeeld to the conditions. Vpon this the king pausing a little with him self, at length rendred this aunswere: Bidding the messenger go to tell his Lord in these words. MarginaliaThe aunswere of K. Edmund. That Edmūd a christian king, for the loue of temporall life, will not submitte himselfe to Pagane Duke, vnlesse he before woulde bee a Christian Incontinent vpon the same, the wicked & crafty Dane approching in most hasty speede vpon the King, encountred with him in battell (as some say) at Thetford: where the king being put to the worse, & pittieng the terrible slaughter of his men: thinking with himselfe rather to submit his owne person to daunger, then his people should be slaine did flye (as Fabian sayth) to the Castle of Framingham: or (as my author writeth to Halesdō, now called S. Edmundesbury, where this blessed man, being on euery side cōpassed of his cruel enimies, yelded himself to their persecution. MarginaliaThe persecution and death of S. Edmund king of the Eastangles. And for that he would not reny or deny Christ and his lawes. they therfore most cruelly bound him vnto a tree, & caused him to be shot to death: and lastly caused his head to be smitten from his body, & cast into the thicke bushes. MarginaliaK. Edmund Martyr. Which head and body at the same time was by his frendes taken vp, and solemnely buried at the sayd Halesdon, otherwise now named S. Edmunds bury. Whose brother named Edwoldus (notwithstanding of ryght, the kingdome fell next vnto him) setting a part the lyking & pleasure of the world, became an Hermite at the Abbey of Cerum, in the Countrey of Dorset.

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MarginaliaRedyng taken of the Danes. After the Martirdome of this blessed Edmund, when the cruell Danes had sufficiently robbed and spoyled that country: they tooke agayne their shippes, and landed in Southrey, & continued their iourney till they [illegible text]rame to the towne of Reading, & there wan the towne with the castle where (as Cambrensis saith) within three dayes of their thether comming, the foresayde Inguar and Hubb. MarginaliaInguar and Hubba slayne. Cap-

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