Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
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Manchester
 
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Manchester
NGR: SJ 840 980

A parish in the hundred of Salford, county palatine of Lancaster; containing the manufacturing town of Manchester and 28 chapelries and townships. 36 miles east by north from Liverpool. Manchester comprises only one parish, which is in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Chester. There are numerous subordinate churches; St Anne's, St Mary's, St Paul's, St John's, St James', St Michael's, St Martin's, St Peter's, St Stephen's, St Mathew's, St Philip's, St George's, St Andrew's, St Clement's, and St Luke's.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1649 [1625]

Queene Mary. Godly letters of M. Bradford holy Martyr.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. Iuly.suffer for his names sake and gospel, as now I doe: I hartily thanke him for it, and am sure that with him I shal be partaker of his glory, as Paule sayth? If we suffer with hym we shall raygne with him. Marginalia2. Tim. 2.Therfore be not faynt harted, but rather reioyce, at the least for my sake which now am in þe right and high way to heauen: for by many afflictions we must enter into the kingdome of heauen. MarginaliaActes. 14.Now will God make knowne his children. When the winde doth not blow, then can not a man know the wheate from þe chaffe: but when the blast commeth, then fleeth away the chaffe, but the wheate remayneth, and is so farre from being hurt that by the winde it is more clensed from the chaffe and knowne to be wheate. Gold when it is cast into the fire, is the more precious: so are Gods children by the crosse of affliction. MarginaliaGod beginneth his iudgement with his owne house.Alwayes God beginneth his iudgement at hys house. Christ and the Apostles were in most miserie in the land of Iewry, but yet the whole land smarted for it after: 

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Bradford is referring to the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans in AD 70.

so now Gods Children are first chastised in this worlde, that they should not be damned with the world: for surely great plagues of God hang ouer this Realme.

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MarginaliaComplaynt of the Carnall and wicked lyfe among the Gospellers.Ye all know there was neuer more knowledge of god and lesse godly liuing and true seruing of God. It was counted a foolishe thing to serue God truely, and earnest prayer was not past vpon. Preaching was but a pastime. The Communion was counted too common. Fasting to subdue the fleshe, was farre out of vse. Almes was almost nothing. Malice, Couertousnes, and vncleannes, was cōmon euery where, with swearing, dronkenes, and idlenes. God therfore nowe is come, as you haue hearde mee preach, and because he will not damne vs with the world he beginneth to punishe vs: as me for my carnall liuinge. For as for my preaching, I am most certaine it is & was Gods trueth, and I trust to geue my life for it by Gods grace: But because I loued not the Gospell truely, but outwardly, therefore doth he thus punish me: nay rather in punishing blesseth me. And in deede I thanke him more of this prison, then of any Parlour, yea then of anye pleasure that euer I had: for in it I finde God my most sweet good God alwayes. MarginaliaThe cause why God first punisheth his in this world.The flesh is punished, first to admonish vs nowe hartily to liue as we professe, secondlye, to certifie the wicked of their iust damnation, if they repent not.

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Perchaunce you are weakened in that whiche I haue preached, because God doth not defend it (as you thinke) but suffereth the popish doctrine to come agayne and preuayle: but you must know, good mother, MarginaliaGod vseth to proue and try his children.that God by this doth proue and try his children & people whether they wil vnfaynedly and simply hang on him & his worde. So dyd he wt the Israelites, bringing thē into a Desert after theyr comming out of Egypt, where (I meane the wildernes) was want of all thinges in comparison of that which they had in egipt. Christ, whē he came into this world, brought no wordly wealth nor quietnes with him, but rather war The world (sayth he) shall reioyce, but ye shall mourne & weepe but your weeping shalbe turned into ioy: and therefore happye are they that mourne and weep, for they shalbe comforted. MarginaliaIohn. 16.They are marked then with Gods marke in their foreheades, and not with the beastes marke, I meane the popes shauen crowne, who now with his shauelinges 

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A derisive term for catholic priests and religious, based on their distinctive tonsure.

reioyce: MarginaliaOf this place the Earle of Darby seemeth to take hold, complayning that he curseth them that teacheth any false doctrine. &c. Page 1523.but woe vnto them, for they shalbe cast down, they shal weep and mourne. The rich glutton had here his ioye and Lazarus sorowe, but afterwardes the time was chaunged. The end of carnall ioy is sorrow. Now let the whoremōger ioy with the dronkarde, swearer, couetous, malicious and blinde bussarde syr Iohn: 
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A slang term for a priest, based on the fact that priests were traditionally addressed as 'sir'.

MarginaliaThe Masse rebuketh no sinne nor shameth consciences, as preaching doth.for the Masse will not byte them, neither make them to blushe, as preaching woulde. Nowe may they doe what they will, come deuils to the Churche and goe deuils home, for no man must find fault. And they are glad of this: now haue they their hartes desire, as the Sodomites had when Lothe was gone, but what followed? Forsooth when they cried peace, al shalbe wel, then came Gods vengeance, fire & brymstone frō heauen, and burnt vp euery mothers child: euen so deare mother will it do to our papistes.

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Wherefore feare God: sticke to his word though all the world would swarue from it. Dye you must once, & when or how, can you not tell. MarginaliaThe best death of all deathes, is to dye for Gods sake.Dye therfore with Christ, suffer for seruing him truely and after his word: for sure may we be that of all deathes it is most to be desired to die for gods sake. This is the most safe kynde of dying: wee can not doubt but that wee shall goe to heauen, if wee dye for hys names sake. And that you shall dye for his names sake Gods word will warrant you, if you sticke to that which God by me hath taught you. You shal see that I speake as I thinke: for by Gods grace I will drincke before you of this cup, if I be put to it.

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I doubt not but God wil geue me his grace, & strengthen me thereunto: pray that he woulde, and that I refuse

it not. I am at a poynt euen when my Lord God will, to come to him. Death nor life, Prison nor pleasure (I trust in God) shalbe able to seperate me from my Lorde God & his Gospell. In peace when no persecution was, then were you content and glad to heare mee, then did you beleue me and will you not do so nowe, seeing I speake that which I trust by Gods grace, if neede bee to verifie wyth my life? Good mother, I write before God to you, as I haue preached before him.

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It is Gods truth I haue taught: It is that same infallible word whereof he sayd: Heauen and earth shall passe: but my word shall not passe. MarginaliaThe Masse is a poyson to the Church.The masse and such baggage as the false worshippers of God and enemies of Christes Crosse (the Papistes I say) haue brought in agayne, to poyson the Church of God withall, displeaseth God highly, and is abhominable in his sight. Happy may he be whiche of conscience suffereth losse of life or goodes in dissalowing it. Come not at it. If God be God follow him: If þe Masse be God: let them that will, see it, heare, or be present at it, & go to the deuill with it. What is there as God ordayned? MarginaliaComparisō betweene the Lordes supper, and the Masse.His supper was ordayned to be receiued of vs in the memoriall of his death, for the confirmation of our fayth, that his body was broken for vs, & his bloud shed for pardon of our sinnes: but in the masse there is no receiuing, but the p.iest keepeth all to himselfe alone. Christ sayth, Take eate: No, sayth the Priest: gape, peepe. There is a sacrificing, yea killing of Christ agayne as much as they may. There is Idolatry in worshipping the outward signe of bread & wyne, there is all in Latine, you cannot tell what he saith. To conclude, there is nothing as God ordeyned. Wherefore my good mother come not at it.

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MarginaliaDoubtes & obiections aunswered. Math. 19.Oh, will some say, it will hinder you, if you refuse to come to masse and to do as other do. But God wil further you, (be you assured) as you shall one day find: who hath promised to them that suffer hinderaunce or losse of anye thing in this world, his great blessing here, and in þe world to come life euerlasting.

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You shall bee counted an hereticke: but not of others then of heretickes, whose prayse is a disprayse.

You are not able to reason agaynst the Priestes: but God wil, that all they shall not be able to withstand you. No body wil do so but you onely: In deede no matter, for fewe enter into the narrow gate which bringeth to saluation. Howbeit, you shall haue with you (I doubt not) Father Traues and other my brothers and sisters to go with you therein: but if they will not, I your sonne in God (I trust) shall not leaue you an inche, but go before you: pray that I may, & geue thankes for me. Reioyce in my suffering, for it is for your sakes to confirme the truth I haue taught. MarginaliaFor all this caueat, yet this letter came to the Earle of Darbyes knowledge.How soeuer you do, beware this letter come not abroad, 

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I.e., be careful that this letter does not circulate. Bradford is worried that if his letters are seen by the authorities, it will lead to restrictions, such as confiscation of his writing supplies.

but into father Traues his handes: for if it should be knowne that I haue pen and inke in the prison, then would it be worse with me. Therfore to your selues keep this letter, commending me to God & his mercy in Christ Iesus, who make me worthy for his names sake, to geue my life for his Gospel and Church sake. Out of the Tower of London,  
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Bull and Foxe deleted a clause from this letter, in which Bradford wrote that he was writing this letter after he had received one from his 'brother' (ECL 260, fo. 125v).

the sixt day of October. 1553.

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My name I write not for causes, you know it well enough: Like the letter neuer the worse. Commend me to all our good brethren and sisters in the Lord. Howsoeuer you do, be obedient to the higher powers, that is no point either in hand or tongue rebell, but rather if they cōmaund that which with good conscience you cānot obey, lay your head on the blocke, and suffer what soeuer they shall do or say. By pacience possesse your soules.

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After the time that M. Bradford, was condemned, and sent to the Counter, it was purposed of his aduersaryes, as ye heard before, that hee should be had to Manchester where he was borne, and there be burned. Whereupon he writeth to the Cittye of London, thinking to take his last Vale 

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I.e., 'farewell'.

of them in this letter.

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¶ To the Citie of London. 
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This letter was first printed in the 1563 edition, reprinted in Letters of the Martyrs, pp. 251-56 and then in subsequent editions of the Acts and Monuments. BL, Add. 19400, fos. 31r-32v is the original letter; ECL 262, fos. 156r-160r and 214v-217r are copies of it.

MarginaliaA fruitefull letter of M. Bradford to the citye of London.TO all that professe the Gospell and true doctrine of our Lord and Sauiour Iesus Christ in the Cittie of London, Iohn Bradford a most vnworthy seruaunt of þe Lord now not onely in prison, but also excommunicated & condemned to be burned for the same true doctrine, wisheth mercy, grace, & peace with increase of al godly knowledge and pietie, from God, the father of mercy, through the merites of oure alone and omnisufficient Redeemer Iesus Christ, by the operation of the holy spritie for euer. Amen.

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My dearely beloued brethren in our Sauiour Christ, although the tyme, I haue to liue is very little (for hourly I looke when I shoulde be had hence to be conueyed into Lankeshyre, there to be burned, and to render my lyfe by

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