Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Elizabeth Warren

Wife of John Warren [Warne]. Martyr.

Elizabeth Warren was arrested on New Year's day in a house in Bow church churchyard, as she was gathered with others at prayer. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

She was a prisoner in the Counter until 11 June 1555. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

She was taken to Newgate and remained there until 2 July 1555. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

She was examined by Bishop Bonner on 6 July 1555. 1563, pp. 1250-51, 1570, pp. 1868-69, 1576, pp. 1599-1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Dr Martin gave suit for Warren's release, but this was overturned by Dr Story. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (Wade, Hayle [Hall], King, Leyes, Fust, Smiyh, Harwood, Tankerfield, Warren [Warne] and Lashford [Warren/Warne]), dated 2 July 1555, signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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She was examined and burned at Stratford Bowe in August 1555. 1563, pp. 1250-51, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

[Alias Warne.]

 
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George King

(d. 1555)

Martyr. Of unknown occupation and origin.

George King was examined by Bishop Bonner. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused London sacramentaries (including King). The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

George King was a prisoner for his beliefs in Lollards' Tower. He became so weak he was removed to a house in the city, where he died. He was cast out into the fields and buried at night. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1883, 1576, p. 1575, 1583, p. 1702.

[Foxe calles him Thomas King in the 1563 edition.]

 
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George Tankerfield

(1527? - 1555)

Born in York, lived in London. Cook. Martyr.

George Tankerfield was a papist during the reign of Edward. He converted under Mary. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, 1689.

He was examined by Bishop Bonner. 1563, pp. 1250-51, 1570, pp. 1869-70, 1576, pp. 1600-01, 1583, pp. 1689-90.

His wife was tricked by Beard, who later attacked him. George Tankerfield was then taken to Newgate by Beard and Simon Ponder. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

He wa sent in by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Tankerfield). It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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Tankerfield was burned at St Albans on 26 August 1555. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

 
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Joan Warren

Maiden. Alias Lashford (or Laishford).

Joan Warren was the daughter of Elizabeth and John Warne (step-father). She is described as a wife in 1563, p. 1451.

She was born in the parish of lytle Sainct Hallowes, Thomas / Thamis Street. 1563, p. 1468, 1570, p. 2030, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Foxe recounts her formative years. 1563, p. 1468, 1570, p. 2030, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

She was apprehended in Bow churchyard, where she had been at communion. 1570, p. 2030, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

She was examined by Bonner. Foxe lists the charges and her answers to the charges. 1563, pp. 1451-54, 1570, p. 2030, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Dr Martin, the commissioner, gave suit for Warren's release, but this was overturned by Dr Scory. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 2030, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Lashford [Warren/Warne]). It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 2030, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's subscription, in which he stated that he expected Warren to burn at the stake. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846.

She was burned at Smithfield in January 1556. 1563, p. 1451, 1570, p. 2030, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

John Careless wrote a letter to Bartlett Green, Thomas Whittle, Joan Warren, Isabel Foster and certain other prisoners in Newgate. 1570, p. 2107, 1576, p. 1818, 1583, pp. 1924-25.

[Also referred to as 'Warne' and 'Warner'.]

 
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John Story

(1510? - 1571)

1st Regius Professor of Civil Law. Roman catholic martyr. (DNB)

John Story was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

In the 1563 edition, Foxe claims that Story urged that Elizabeth be executed, maintaining that it was pointless to cut the branches off a tree and not strike at its roots (1563, p. 1004). These passages were never reprinted.

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked him to discover what Master G. had said to Doctor Story and others. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

Dr Story was said by Dr Martin to have been the chief procurer of the deaths of John Warren, his wife and daughter, although he was a relative of theirs. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

When John Denley sang a psalm at his burning, Story rebuked him for it. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686.

John Story is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

The first examination of John Philpot was by Cholmley, Master Roper and John Story and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall on 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89 , 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Story was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was sent to Story. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Henry Adlington received a letter from John Careless, which referred to Story. 1570, pp. 2110-12, 1576, pp. 1833-34, 1583, pp. 1928-29.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

A chaplain asked Thomas Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Story commanded Green be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story, when he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

At Elizabeth's accession Story was committed to ward but he managed to escape overseas, where he met with the duke of Alva in Antwerp. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker, a merchant, was sent to apprehend Story and return him to England. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker told Story that a ship had come from England and that he might like to peruse the merchandise on board. Story suspected nothing, was caught and returned to England. 1583, p. 2153.

In prison, Story refused to agree to the act of supremacy and was subsequently hung, drawn and quartered as a traitor. 1583, p. 2153.

Foxe refers to his death. 1563, p. 1706.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Wade

(d. 1555)

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Wade). It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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John Wade was a prisoner for his beliefs in Lollard's Tower. He became so weak he was removed to a house in the city, where he died. He was cast out into the fields and buried at night. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1883, 1576, p. 1575, 1583, p. 1702.

NB: Foxe refers to him incorrectly as Richard Smith in 1563.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Warren

Upholsterer. Martyr. Husband of Elizabeth Warne and stepfather to Joan Lashford/Warren.

Dr Martin gave suit for Warren's release, but this was overturned by Dr Scory. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

John Warren was burned at the end of May 1555. 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

 
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Mrs Tankerfield

Wife of George Tankerfield.

Mrs Tankerfield was tricked by Beard into exposing her husband's whereabouts. George Tankerfield was later attacked by Beard. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

In a letter to his wife,Robert Smith asked that letters to him be delivered to 'sister Tankerfield', who could be trusted to deliver them into his hand. 1563, p. 1267, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Smith

(d. 1555)

Painter. Martyr.

Foxe relates Robert Smith's early years, physical appearance and attributes. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Robert Smith was in service to Sir Thomas Smith. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

He was transferred to Windsor, where he had a clerkship in the college of £10 per annum 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

He was influenced by the preaching and reading of M. Turner. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

He was sent to Newgate by John Matthew on 5 November 1555. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Robert Smith interrogated William Flower, when they were both imprisoned in Newgate, about Flower's assault on a priest. 1563, pp. 1135 [recte 1134]-1144 [recte 1135]; 1570, pp. 1746-47; 1576, pp. 1491-92; 1583, p. 1574.

Smith was examined by Bonner, met with Harwood in the garden, and was re-examined. Smith was then left in the garden until Harwood was examined, after which Smith was examined again. 1563, pp. 1252-55, 1570, pp. 1870-72, 1576, pp. 1601-03, 1583, pp. 1691-92.

Robert Smith was examined by John Dee, Harpsfield and Bonner on eucharistic doctrine. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Smith was held in a chamber at Bonner's house while Bonner went to condemn John Denley and John Newman. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

The lord mayor was brought to hear Smith's examination before Bonner and Harpsfield (probably on same day as the condemnation of Denley). 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1602, 1583, p. 1691.

Robert Smith was again examined before Bonner, Mordant and Dee. 1563, p. 1255, 1570, p. 1872, 1576, p. 1603, 1583, p. 1692.

Smith told his examiners of the time he was in waiting to a gentleman of Norfolk, who was persuaded by a priest to give away many of his goods and to give to Master Gresham and another man a great sum of money. The gentleman managed to recoup some of the money, to the sum of £200 - £300, from Gresham and the other man to whom he had given money. 1563, p. 1255, 1570, p. 1872, 1576, p. 1603, 1583, p. 1692.

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Smith told his examiners that he knew of the death of Richard Hunne, who had red-hot needles thrust up his nose and was then hanged. Smith accused his examiners of then telling the people that Hunne had hanged himself. He then followed this with the tale of a priest who had his flesh ripped away with a pair of pincers until he died, when the people were told that the rats had eaten him. He accused Bonner and the others of trying to kill Christ. 1563, p. 1255, 1570, p. 1872, 1576, p. 1603, 1583, p. 1692.

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During the last examination of Smith, his articles were read before the mayor and the sheriffs. 1563, pp. 12585-9, 1570, pp. 1874-75, 1576, pp. 1604-05, 1583, pp. 1694-95.

Bonner told the mayor that Tankerfield was 'Master speaker' and that Smith was 'Master Countroller'. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

Gresham denied the story about the gentleman of Norfolk. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

Mordant claimed to be present during Smith's tale of the Norfolk gentleman. Bonner said he was, but Smith insisted to the mayor that he was not. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

Tankerfield professed to Gresham that his beliefs and Smith's were not heresies. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

Woodruff joined in with Bonner's calls for Smith to be taken away, and Bonner said that Smith should do his preaching at the stake. 1563, p. 1259, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1605, 1583, p. 1694.

Smith told Bonner that he should not make up tales about Tankerfield. Bonner told Smith that he had offered Tankerfield a chance for instruction but he dismissed it. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

Woodruff echoed Bonner's call for Smith and Tankerfield to be taken away after their condemnation. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Smith). It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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Smith sent his mother-in-law some nutmeg and his daughter some comfets. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

Smith's letters and verses: 1563, pp. 1261-67, 1570, pp. 1876-77, 1576, pp. 1606-07 [most of the verses are omitted in 1570 and 1576], 1583, pp. 1695-1702.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Nicholas Hare

(1495 - 1557)

Judge. Eldest son of John Hare of Homersfield, Suffolk, by Elizabeth Fotescue, his wife. [DNB] Master of the Rolls (1553 - 1557) MP for Downton, Wiltshire (1529), Norfolk (1539 - 1540), Lancaster (1544 - 1545). Speaker of the House (1539 - 1540) (DNB; Bindoff)

Sir Nicholas Hare was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

On 15 April 1555, Hare was ordered by the privy council to interrogate William Flower and also to have Bishop Bonner and the Middlesex JPs initiate proceedings against Flower. 1583, p. 1561.

Sir Nicholas Hare wrote a letter to Edmond Tyrrell in June 1555. 1563, p. 1245, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

Edmond Tyrrel wrote to one of the queen's commissioners stating that he had received a letter from that [unnamed] commissioner and Sir Nicholas Hare via John Failes on 12 June 1555. 1563, p. 1245, 1570, p. 1864, 1576, p. 1596, 1583, p. 1683.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689. [Hare sent ten Newgate prisoners to be examined by Bonner: Elizabeth Warne, George Tankerfield, Robert Smith, Steven Harwood, Thomas Fust, William Haile, George King, John Wade, Joan Lashford.] 1570, p. 1878, 1576, p. 1608, 1583, p. 1702.

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Thomas Leyes was sent to Newgate by Sir Nicholas Hare. 1570, p. 1878, 1576, p. 1608, 1583, p. 1702.

[Hare was not a knight, but both Foxe and the Privy Council Register mistakenly call him 'Sir' (cf. APC V, p. 115). The overseers to Hare's will were the outspoken conservatives Sir Edward Waldegrave and Sir John Baker; his three sons were all Elizabethan recusants (Bindoff, Commons).]

 
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Sir Richard Read

Officer of the Court of Chancery. Alderman of London; JP Essex and Middlesex (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6]

Sir Richard Read was ordered by the privy council to examine Sir Thomas Benger, Cary, John Dee and John Field on 5 and 7 May 1555. 1583, p. 1581.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

George Ambrose was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 21 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Drakes was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Richard Read was told during his examinations of 16 January 1555 that the Spurges, Ambrose and Cavel had been complained of by the parson of the church in Bocking. The priest had complained to Lord Rich who had taken the complaint further. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Cavel was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Richard and Thomas Spurge were examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor, on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Tyms was examined by Richard Read, the lord chancellor on 22 March 1556. 1563, p. 1505 [1563 says 21 March], 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1789, 1583, p. 1895.

Commemorations were given to Read at King's College shortly after the exhumation of Bucer, at the commission's command. 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

Read was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Steven Harwood

(d. 1555)

Brewer. Martyr. Of Stratford.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Harwood). The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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Harwood was examined by Bishop Bonner. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Robert Smith agreed with Harwood's confession. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Harwood was condemned with Thomas Fust, Robert Smith and George Tankerfield. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

He was burned at Stratford. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

[Foxe also refers to him as 'Horwood'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Beard

A tailor in Fleet Street, London. Marian informer against protestants. [Bridgen, London and the Reformation, pp. 454, 569, 626.]

Beard visited John Cardmaker in Newgate prison a few days before Cardmaker's execution and tried to persuade him to recant; Cardmaker refused. 1570, p. 1754; 1576, p. 1498; 1583, p. 1581.

Beard discovered John Small reading from an English Bible to a small group in the house of James Trevisam. He denounced the group to the authorities and had them arrest. 1570, p. 1843, 1576, p. 1577, 1583, p. 1665.

George Tankerfield's wife was tricked by Beard. She later attacked him. George Tankerfield was then taken to Newgate by Beard and Simon Ponder. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Thomas Beard died wretchedly. 1563, p. 1705, 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

[NB: Beard tried to obtain banned catholic books during Edward VI's reign; see Brigden, London, p. 454].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Fust

(d. 1555)

Hosier. Martyr.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Fust). The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and was signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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Thomas Fust was condemned with Robert Smith, George Tankerfield and Stephen Harwood. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

He was burned at Ware, August 1555. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

[Also referred to as Thomas 'Foist'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Leyes

(d. 1555)

Of Thorpe, Essex. Prisoner for his beliefs in Newgate.

Thomas Leyes was sent to Newgate by Sir Nicholas Hare. 1570, p. 1878, 1576, p. 1608, 1583, p. 1702.

Leyes was examined by Bishop Bonner. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

He became so weak he was removed to a house in the city, where he died. He was cast out into the fields and buried at night. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1878, 1576, p. 1608, 1583, p. 1702.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Leyes). It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Martin

(d. 1597?)

Of Winterbourne St Martin, Dorset; Steeple Morden, Cambridge and London. DCL (1555), LLD (1587). MP Saltash (1553), Hindon (1554 and 1555), Ludgershall (1558). Chancellor to Stephen Gardiner by 1554. Commr. Visit Oxford University (1555), collect surveys and acct. religious houses (1556), heresy (1557), heretical books (1557). [Bindoff]

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Thomas Martin was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Thomas Martin searched John Hooper's room in the Fleet. 1563, p. 1056; 1570, pp. 1679-80; 1576, p. 1433; 1583, p. 1507.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

A talk took place between Cranmer and Martyn while Cranmer was in prison. 1576, pp. 1770-71, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

John Careless' first examination was before Dr Martin, marshall of the King's Bench [Sir William Fitzwilliam - DNB + Hasler / Bindoff], Dr Martin's scribe and an unspecified priest in the lord chancellor's house. 1563, pp. 1529-35, 1570, pp. 2101-02, 1576, pp. 1813-14, 1583, pp. 1919-20.

Elizabeth Young's second examination was before Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2269, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her third examination took place before Martin. 1570, pp. 2269-70, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Robert Horneby was delivered from condemnation by Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Cooke

DD (1537). Fellow of All Souls (1527 - 1535) (Foster). Prebend of Kilsby (Lincoln) (1554 - 1559). Deprived after September 1559 (Fasti).

William Cooke was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Dr Cook took part in the examination of William Tyms, Robert Drakes, Thomas Spurge, Richard Spurge, John Cavel and George Ambrose. 1570, pp. 2076-77, 1576, p. 1791, 1583, pp. 1896-97.

John Jackson was examined by Dr Cook 11 March 1556. Foxe records his questions and answers. 1563, pp. 1611-12, 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Thomas Moore denied transubstantiation when examined by Dr Cook and so was condemned. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, pp. 1855-56, 1583, p. 1949.

Richard Woodman's first examination before Christopherson, Story, Cooke and others took place on 14 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1573-79, 1570, p. 2174-78, 1576, pp. 1877-81, 1583, pp. 1986-89.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Hales

(d. 1555)

Martyr. Of Thorpe, Essex.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Hayle [Hall]). The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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William Hales was examined by Bishop Bonner on 12 July 1555 with Robert Smith, George Tankerfield and others. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

He was sent for examination by Sir Nicholas Hare. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

William Hales was delivered to the sheriff to be burned. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

He was burned at Barnet towards the end of August 1555. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

[Foxe uses the variants 'Hayle', 'Haile'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Roper

(1495/96 - 1578)

Of Lynsted. JP, MP (1529, 1545, 1547, 1553, 1554, 1555, 1558). Sheriff of Kent (1554 - 1555). Son-in-law to Sir Thomas More and author of a celebrated biographical sketch of More (DNB; Bindoff).

William Roper was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Roper was originally included in the Commission of the Peace for Middlesex in 1555, but his name was deleted. [SP11/5, no. 6]

On 1 April 1555, the Privy Council ordered Roper to arrest Thomas Woodgate and William Maynarde for clandestine preaching. 1583, p. 1561.

On 7 April Roper was ordered to arrest a man from Harwich, who went about with a boy, preaching from place to place. 1583, p. 1561. [NB: Foxe is mistaken in saying that the order was to arrest one Harwich; see APC V, p. 110].

After Master Roper of Lynsted talked with the judges, it was decided that John Bland should be returned to Maidstone until the Greenwich sessions of 18-19 February. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Roper escorted John Wade to his burning in July 1555. 1576, p. 1600, 1583, pp. 1679-80.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee [not listed here as Dr] were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Roper took part in the examination of several prisoners in Colchester on 19 October 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

The sixth and last examination of Richard Woodman took place before Chichester, William Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. 1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thorpe [Thorpe le Soken]
NGR: TM 180 223

A parish in the hundred ofTendring, county of Essex. 9.5 miles south-east by south from Manningtree. The living is a discharged vicarage consolidated with those of Kirby le Soken and Walton le Soken, in the jurisdiction of the peculiar court of the Sokens.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1713 [1689]

Queene Mary. The Martyrdome of Elizabeth Warne. George Tankerfield, Martyr.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. Iuly.And thus these vj. heauenly Martyrs and witnes bearers to the truth, beyng condemned by the bloudy Suffragan and Archdeacon of Canterbury, M. Collins, and M. Faucet, 

Commentary  *  Close

The names of Collins and Faucet were added in 1570.

were burned altogether in the same towne of Canterb. at three stakes and one fire, about the latter ende of August.

The copy of their sentence condemnatorie, you maye find aboue in the story of Iohn Rogers, for the papists in all their condemnations follow one maner of sentence of course commonly against all that be condemned through their vnmercifull tiranny.

¶ The persecution of tenne Martyrs together, sent by certaine of the Counsaile to Boner to be examined. 
Commentary  *  Close
The Martyrdom of George Tankerfield and Elizabeth Warne

All that the Rerum says about these martyrs is that George Tankerfield wasexecuted at St Albans in late August 1555 (p. 513). Almost all of the account of these martyrs was first printed in the 1563 edition. The letter from the royal commissioners and the summary of Elizabeth Warne's examinations are taken from London diocesan accounts; the rest of this material came from oral sources. These accounts were unchanged in the 1570 and 1576 editions, but in the 1583 edition a detailed account of Tankerfield's final hours was added for the first time; the accountcertainly came from an eyewitness or eyewitnesses.

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Marginalia10. Martyrs sent vp together to Bishop Boner AFter the burning of these vj. aboue named: next followeth the persecution of x. other true seruauntes and saints of the Lord, not such saints as the Pope maketh, or which are mentioned in Legenda sanctorum, 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Book titles
Foxe text Latin

Legenda sanctorum … vitis patrum … de vita sanctorum Wallensium. etc.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2003)

Legends of the saints … lives of the fathers … on the life of the Valdensian saints. etc

or in vitis patrū 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Book titles
Foxe text Latin

Legenda sanctorum … vitis patrum … de vita sanctorum Wallensium. etc.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2003)

Legends of the saints … lives of the fathers … on the life of the Valdensian saints. etc

or in the fabulous 
Commentary  *  Close

I.e., full of fables and legends, not factual.

booke de vita sanctorum Wallensium, &c. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Book titles
Foxe text Latin

Legenda sanctorum … vitis patrum … de vita sanctorum Wallensium. etc.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2003)

Legends of the saints … lives of the fathers … on the life of the Valdensian saints. etc

 
Commentary  *  Close

These were all medieval collections of saints' lives.

but such as are spoken of in the holy Apocalyps, of whom it is written: MarginaliaApoc. 22.Hij sunt qui sequuntur Agnum quocunq; ierit, quique lauarunt stolas suas in sanguine agni i. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
St. John, Revelation, 7. 14.
Foxe text Latin

Hi sunt qui sequuntur Agnum quocunque ierit, quique lauarunt stolas suas in sanguine Agni.

Foxe text translation

These bee they that follow the Lambe whether soeuer he goeth, & whiche haue washed their stooles in the bloud of the Lambe. &c.

Actual text of St. John, Revelation 7, 14 (Vulgate)

hii sunt qui veniunt de tribulatione magna et laverunt stolas suas et dealbaverunt eas in sanguine agni.

These bee they that follow the Lambe whether soeuer he goeth, & whiche haue washed their stooles in the bloud of the Lambe, &c. Thus these saints be not of the Popes makyng, or rather to say the truth, they are of the Popes making, MarginaliaSaintes of the Popes making.of þe Popes makyng (I say) in this respect, not that the saints of God are made by the Pope, but that the saints of God are tried and declared by the Pope: so as by afflictions of Sathan Iobs patience was prooued, by Pharao Gods power declared, and by Salmator, Tarentum 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Cicero
Foxe text Latin

Salmator, Tarentum … Q. Fabius …

Foxe text translation

Not translated, as all three are proper nouns, but the citation is clear.

Actual text of Cicero De Senectute III-IV, §§ 7 and 10.

7. … C. Salinator . … 10. Ego Q. Maximum, eum qui Tarentum receipt …

[Once again the spelling ofSalinatoris incorrect - cf.1570and1576versions for the correct spelling:Salinator.]

 
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Note that this was spelled as 'Salvator' in the 1563 edition, but was corrected in the 1570 edition to 'Salinator'. This is an indication of the thoroughness of the proof-reading of the 1570 edition. The name was misprinted as 'Salmator' in the 1583 edition.

was won (as Tullie  
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Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 - 143 BCE), the Roman orator and writer.

writeth 
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Cattley/Pratt, VII, 342, fn 2

"Tarentum verò quâ vigilantiâ quo consilio recepit! cum quidem me audiente, Salinatori, qui amisso oppido fugerat in arcem, glorianti atque ita dicenti. Meâ operâ Q. Fabi. Tarentum recepisti;" etc. M. T. Cicero, Cato Major seu De Senectute ad T. P. Atticum; ¶ 4. - ED.

) for except he had lost it before, Q. Fabius 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Cicero
Foxe text Latin

Salmator, Tarentum … Q. Fabius …

Foxe text translation

Not translated, as all three are proper nouns, but the citation is clear.

Actual text of Cicero De Senectute III-IV, §§ 7 and 10.

7. … C. Salinator . … 10. Ego Q. Maximum, eum qui Tarentum receipt …

[Once again the spelling ofSalinatoris incorrect - cf.1570and1576versions for the correct spelling:Salinator.]

could not haue recouered it: 
Commentary  *  Close

Foxe is quoting from Cicero, Cato Maior de Senectute, sections 7 and 11. Marcus Livius Salinator was the Roman governor of the city of Tarentum during the Second Punic War. Salinator held the citadel when the rest of the city was captured by Hannibal. After the Roman consul Quintus Fabius Maximus Cunctator had recaptured Tarentum in 209 BCE, Salinator was irritated that all of the glory went to Fabius and commented that the city would not have been recaptured if not for him. Fabius responded that this was indeed true, for if Salinator had not lost Tarentum, then he, Fabius, could not have recaptured it. Foxe is saying that the pope similarly created saints, for if there were no persecution, there would be no martyrs.

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so in lyke maner, vnlesse by Antichrist good men had bene destroyed, otherwyse they had not bene tryed true Martyrs of Christ. The names of these were: Marginalia10. Martyrs sēt by the commissioners.

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Elizabeth Warne.
George Tankerfield.
Robert Smith.
Steuen Harwood.
Thomas Fust.
William Hale.
Thomas Leyes.
George King.
Iohn Wade.
Ione Layshford.

The prisons of London beginnyng now to be replenished with gods saints, and stil mo and mo comming in, the Counsaile & Commissioners thinkyng to make ready dispatch with the poore prisoners, cause these x. aboue named, to be sent with their letter directed to Boner Bish. of London, by hym to be examined, and rid out of the way. 

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The privy council was putting pressure on Bonner to speed up the trials of those accused of heresy; this would become particularly clear in the case of John Philpot.

The copy of which their letter, with their names subscribed, here followeth to be read and noted.

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A letter sent by the Commissioners to the B. of of London D. Boner. 
Commentary  *  Close

This letter was almost certainly copied out of a now lost court book of Bishop Bonner.

MarginaliaThe letter of the Commissioners to B. Boner.AFter our harty commendations to your good Lordship, wee send you here Ioh. Waid, Wil. Haile, George King, Th. Leyes of Thorpe in Essex, Thomas Fust Hosier, Robert Smyth Painter, Steuen Harwood Brewer, George Tankerfield Cooke, Elizabeth Warne, Ioane Layshford of London, Sacramentaries: all whiche we desire your Lordship to examine, and to order accordyng to the Ecclesiastical lawes: praying your Lordship to appoynt some of your officers to receyue them at this bearers hand. And thus most hartily, fare your Lordship well. From London this 2. Iuly.

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Your lordships louyng friendes. MarginaliaNames of the Commissioners.

Nich. Hare.
Will. Roper.
Rich. Rede.
Will. Cooke.

The history of Elizabeth VVarne widow, burnt at Stratford bowe.

MarginaliaElizabeth Warne Martyr.NOw seuerally to prosecute the stories of these x. Martyrs aforenamed, first we will begin with the historie of Elizabeth Warne, who in this moneth of August  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Addenda: ref page 342, line 8 from the bottom

"The xxiii day of August was bornyd ... a woman [wife] of John Waren, clothworker." Machyn's Diary, p. 92. For her husband's martyrdom see above.

was burned at Stratford Bowe, nye vnto London, widowe, late the wyfe of Ioh. Warne Vpholster, and Martyr, who also was burned in the end of the month of May last past, as before in hys storye is recorded. This Elizabeth had bene apprehended amongst others, the first day of Ianuary, in a house in Bow Church yard in London, as they were gathered together in prayer, and at that present was caried to the Counter (as is also aboue specified) where she lay as prisoner vntil the 11. day of Iune. At which time she was brought vnto Newgate, and remayned there in lyke case vnto the 2. day of Iuly. Then shee was sent by the Kyng and Queeues Commissioners vnto Boner B.

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of London, who the sixt day of the same moneth, caused her with diuers others (Robert Smith, George Tankerfield, &c.) to be brought before hym into hys Pallace, and there examined her vpon sundry Articles, such as of common order be ministred vnto the poore saints & Martyrs of God, as ye may more playnely perceyue by other more large and ample processes, as wel before, as hereafter mentioned. MarginaliaElizabeth Warne brought to examinatiō.

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The chiefest obiection that he vsed, eyther towardes her, or the most of those, was touchyng the reall and corporall presence of the body and bloud of Christ in the Sacrament of the aultar, as the chiefest ground & profitablest foundation for their Catholike dignitie. Many other matters he obiected agaynst them, as for not commyng to the Church, for speakyng agaynst the masse, for despising their ceremonies and new founde Sacramentes, with dyuers other fonde and triflyng toyes, not worthy any mentionyng.

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In the ende, when she had bene diuers tymes brought before hym and other hys adherentes, and there earnestly exhorted to recant, shee sayde: MarginaliaThe words of Elizabeth Warne at her examinationDoe what ye will. For if Christ was in an errour, then am I in an errour. Vppon which aunswere, she was the xij. day of the same moneth of Iuly, adiudged and condemned as an heretike, and so deliuered vnto the secular power (as they terme it (to be by them (yet at the Clergies appoyntment) put to death, which thyng was accomplished in her the same month aboue mentioned.

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MarginaliaA story of D. Story vpō the report of D. Martins owne wordes.The chiefe procurer of this her death, was D. Story beyng (as it is thought) of some alliaunce eyther to her the sayd Elizabeth, or els to her late husband. 

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John Warne, the martyr, who had already been executed on 30 January 1555.

Who, thogh he was at the first apprehension of his sayd kinswoman, a very earnest suiter for her deliueraunce to Doctor Martin, then oue of the Kyng and Queenes Commissioners in matters of Religion (hymselfe beyng as yet not made Commissioner) and had by his sute obteyned her deliueraunce for that present, as Doct. Martin (hymselfe the authour hereof)  
Commentary  *  Close

Apparently Martin was the source for this story, but Foxe probably heard it through intermediaries.

hath reported, yet afterwards, vpon what occasion God onely knoweth, except vpon some burning charitie the sayd Doctor Story, obteyning now the roome of one of the Commissioners, caused not onely the sayde Iohn Warne, but also hys wyfe, & afterwards his daughter to be agayne apprehended, neuer leauyng them, vntyll hee had brought them all to ashes. MarginaliaD. Story persecuteth his kinsfolkes.Such was the rage of that deuout catholike, and white chyld of þe mother church 
Commentary  *  Close

Note that Foxe has replaced the savage description of Story in the 1563 edition with an ironic characterization; this is an example of Foxe moderating his language in the second edition of his work.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 343, line 11 from the bottom

In the first Edition of the Acts and Monuments, p. 1251, it is, "of that monstrous Bonnerian, and cruel papist;" but the expression is altered in the Edition of 1570.

that neyther kinred nor any other consideratiō could preuaile with hym, although it dyd (at hys request) wyth others, who in respect of hym, were but straungers vnto them. The Lord if it be hys will turne hys hart, or els rid hys poore Church from such an Hidra, as thanked bee the Lord, now he hath.

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¶ George Tankerfield a faythfull Martyr and witnesse of the Gospell, constantly suffering for the testimonie of the same.

MarginaliaThe story of George Tankerfield Martyr.GEorge Tankerfield of London Cooke, borne in the Citie of Yorke, about the age of xxvij. or xxviij. yeres, was in king Edwards daies a very papist, til the time Queene Mary came in, and then perceiuing the great crueltye vsed of the Popes side, was brought into a misdoubte of theyr doings, and begā (as he said) in his heart to abhorre them. And as concerning the masse, whereof he had but a doubtful opinion before, and much striuing with him self in that case, at length hee fell to prayer, desiring God in mercye to open to him the truth, that he might be thorowly perswaded therein, whether it were of God, or no: MarginaliaTankerfield prayeth to God to know whether the Masse be good or no.If not, that he might vtterly hate it in his hearte, and abhorre it: whiche according to his prayer, the Lorde mercifully heard, woorking daily more and more in him to detest and abhorre the same: and so was mooued to read the Testament, whereby (as is sayd) the Lord lightened his minde with the knowledge of the truthe, woorking liuely faith in him to beleeue the same, and vtterly to detest all papistrie, and so he came no more to their doings: MarginaliaTankerfield how he was first called to the knowledge of the Gospell.And not onely that, but also thys liuely faith, sayd he, kindled such a flame in him, as would not be kept in, but vtter it selfe by confession therof, reprouing his owne former doings to his friendes, exhorting them likewise to conuert and turne to the truth with him, and thus he began to be smelled out among them, til at the last he was sent for, as followeth.

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MarginaliaThe order and maner how Tankerfield was first apprehended by Beard.It pleased God to strike him wt sicknesse, whereby hee lay long sicke: and on a certaine day to take the air abroad, he rose vp and went and walked into the Temple fieldes, to see þe shooters. 

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I.e., archers hunting in the fields.

In the meane season came Bearde home to his house, and inquired for him, pretending to his wife, that he came only for to haue hym to come and dresse a bā-

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ket
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