Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesLatin/Greek TranslationsCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Dee

(1527 - 1608)

Mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. [DNB]

Dee is described by Foxe as a 'great coniurer' to whom Philpot was sent, shortly before Philpot's martyrdom. 1563, p. 1445, 1570, p. 1999. This is removed from the 1576 and 1583 editions.

On 29 May 1555, the privy council ordered Sir Francis Englefield to apprehend John Dee and to search for books and papers concerning him. 1583, pp. 1577-78.

On 5 June 1555 the privy council ordered that Cary, John Dee, John Field and Benger should be examined about their confessions concerning the practice of conjuring. 1583, p. 1581.

On 7 June the privy council ordered that Cary, Dee, Field and Benger be examined again about conjuring and witchcraft. 1583, p. 1581.

On 29 August 1555, Dee and Cary were released on bond. 1583, p. 1581.

Robert Smith was examined by John Dee, Harpsfield and Bonner on eucharistic doctrine. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Robert Smith was again examined before Bonner, Mordant and Dee. 1563, p. 1255, 1570, p. 1872, 1576, p. 1603, 1583, p. 1692.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner; Rochester, chancellor of Lichfield; Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

In Philpot's seventh examination, John Dee is referred to as Master Dee in 1563 and 1570 and then as Doctor Dee in 1576 and 1583. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

In Philpot's eleventh examination, John Dee is referred to as a 'great conjurer' in 1563 and 1570. The reference is removed in 1576 and 1583. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

In the letter exhibited by Bonner about Bartlett Green, reference is made to John Dee and Feckenham. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, pp. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

In a letter that was never delivered, Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee [not listed here as Dr] were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Bartlett Green met with John Dee, who was very friendly to him. 1563, p. 1462, 1570, p. 2024, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1853.

[Foxe refers to Dee as 'D.' in the 1576 and 1583 editions. This is discussed in Julian Roberts, 'Bibliographical Aspects of John Foxe' in David Loades (ed.), John Foxe and the English Reformation (Aldershot, 1999), pp. 36-37 and 49].

[Also referred to as 'John D']

 
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John Harpsfield

(1516 - 1578)

Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Archdeacon of London (1554 - 1559); dean of Norwich (1558 - 1559). Brother of Nicholas Harpsfield. [DNB; Fasti]

Harpsfield preached a sermon at the commencement of the 1553 convocation (1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1340; and 1583, p. 1410).

He sparred with Philpot in the debates at the 1553 convocation. (See 1563, pp. 909, 912 and 914-15; 1570, pp. 1573-74 and 1576-78; 1576, pp. 1342 and 1345-46 and 1583, pp. 1412 and 1416-17).

He was one of the catholic disputants at the Oxford disputations of 1554; he debated with Cranmer and Ridley (1563, pp. 932-34, 938, 955, 967-69 and 978; 1570, pp. 1591-93 and 1605-6; 1576, pp. 1358-59 and 1370-71; 1583, pp. 1428, 1430 and 1440-41).

Harpsfield disputed on the eucharist for his D.D. on 19 April 1554; Cranmer disputed with him (1563, pp. 986-91; 1570, pp. 1627-32; 1576, pp. 1389-92; 1583, pp. 1459-63).

He gave a Latin oration in St Paul's before King Philip (1570, p. 1643; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He witnessed Bonner's burning Tomkins' hand with a candle, and he urged Bonner to cease the torture (1570, pp. 1710-11; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p.1534).

Together with William Chedsey and John Feckenham, Harpsfield attempted to persuade John Hooper to recant after his condemnation on 29 January 1555. The attempt was unsuccessful but it caused false rumors of Hooper's recantation to spread (1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507).

Harpsfield witnessed the degradation of John Rogers and John Hooper on 4 February 1555 (1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508).

He was one of those who presided over the examination of Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555 (1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535).

Harpsfield was one of those who examined Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed on 18 February 1555 (1563, p. 1104). Bonner ordered him to deliver a rebuttal to the confession of faith of Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed (1563, p. 1107; 1570, p. 1719; 1576, p. 1468; 1583, p. 1541).

He conversed with Thomas Hawkes in June 1554, arguing the necessity of infant baptism. 1563, pp. 1151-52;1570, pp. 1760-61; 1576, p. 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, pp. 1587-88

He escorted Thomas Hawkes to the Gatehouse at Westminster on 1 July 1554. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1765;1576, p. 1765; 1583, p. 1590

John Harpsfield conferred with the bishop of Durham about John Bradford. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1787, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1609.

On 16 February 1555 John Harpsfield and two others went to see Bradford in prison, to defend the line of bishops in the catholic church. Bradford refuted the argument. 1563, pp. 1202-03, 1570, pp. 1792-93, 1576, pp. 1530-31, 1583, pp. 1614-15.

Smith was examined by Bonner and Harpsfield, among others, met with Harwood in the garden, and was re-examined. Smith was then left in the garden until Harwood was examined, after which Smith was examined again. 1563, pp. 1252-55, 1570, pp. 1870-72, 1576, pp. 1601-03, 1583, pp. 1691-92.

Robert Smith was examined by John Dee, Harpsfield and Bonner on eucharistic doctrine. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session to examine Philpot, and Chadsey, who had however left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

John Harpsfield urged Thomas Whittle to recant and composed a bill of submission for Whittle to sign. 1563, pp. 1454-55, 1570, p. 2017, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, pp. 1845-46.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's suscription. It mentioned one of Penbroke's men who wanted license to erect a school. Harpsfield hoped for Penbroke's sake that it be requested, and he and M Johnson (Register) were working to that effect. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47. [In all editions after 1563, the heading incorrectly gives the author of the letter as Nicholas Harpsfield.]

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

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Bonner sent Thomas Hinshaw before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner attended evensong with John Harpsfield prior to causing several boys to be beaten in 1558. 1563, p. 1692, 1570, p. 2264, 1576, p. 1955, 1583, p. 2061.

Bonner and Harpsfield laughed at and mocked Edward Benet for his beliefs. 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Matthew

Yeoman of the Guard.

Robert Smith was sent to Newgate by John Matthew on 5 November 1555. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Master Turner

Of Windsor.

Master Turner's preachings and readings confirmed Robert Smith in the truth. 1583, p. 1691; 1576, p. 1601; 1570, p. 1870; 1563, p. 1252.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Smith

(d. 1555)

Painter. Martyr.

Foxe relates Robert Smith's early years, physical appearance and attributes. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Robert Smith was in service to Sir Thomas Smith. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

He was transferred to Windsor, where he had a clerkship in the college of £10 per annum 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

He was influenced by the preaching and reading of M. Turner. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

He was sent to Newgate by John Matthew on 5 November 1555. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Robert Smith interrogated William Flower, when they were both imprisoned in Newgate, about Flower's assault on a priest. 1563, pp. 1135 [recte 1134]-1144 [recte 1135]; 1570, pp. 1746-47; 1576, pp. 1491-92; 1583, p. 1574.

Smith was examined by Bonner, met with Harwood in the garden, and was re-examined. Smith was then left in the garden until Harwood was examined, after which Smith was examined again. 1563, pp. 1252-55, 1570, pp. 1870-72, 1576, pp. 1601-03, 1583, pp. 1691-92.

Robert Smith was examined by John Dee, Harpsfield and Bonner on eucharistic doctrine. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Smith was held in a chamber at Bonner's house while Bonner went to condemn John Denley and John Newman. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

The lord mayor was brought to hear Smith's examination before Bonner and Harpsfield (probably on same day as the condemnation of Denley). 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1602, 1583, p. 1691.

Robert Smith was again examined before Bonner, Mordant and Dee. 1563, p. 1255, 1570, p. 1872, 1576, p. 1603, 1583, p. 1692.

Smith told his examiners of the time he was in waiting to a gentleman of Norfolk, who was persuaded by a priest to give away many of his goods and to give to Master Gresham and another man a great sum of money. The gentleman managed to recoup some of the money, to the sum of £200 - £300, from Gresham and the other man to whom he had given money. 1563, p. 1255, 1570, p. 1872, 1576, p. 1603, 1583, p. 1692.

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Smith told his examiners that he knew of the death of Richard Hunne, who had red-hot needles thrust up his nose and was then hanged. Smith accused his examiners of then telling the people that Hunne had hanged himself. He then followed this with the tale of a priest who had his flesh ripped away with a pair of pincers until he died, when the people were told that the rats had eaten him. He accused Bonner and the others of trying to kill Christ. 1563, p. 1255, 1570, p. 1872, 1576, p. 1603, 1583, p. 1692.

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During the last examination of Smith, his articles were read before the mayor and the sheriffs. 1563, pp. 12585-9, 1570, pp. 1874-75, 1576, pp. 1604-05, 1583, pp. 1694-95.

Bonner told the mayor that Tankerfield was 'Master speaker' and that Smith was 'Master Countroller'. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

Gresham denied the story about the gentleman of Norfolk. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

Mordant claimed to be present during Smith's tale of the Norfolk gentleman. Bonner said he was, but Smith insisted to the mayor that he was not. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

Tankerfield professed to Gresham that his beliefs and Smith's were not heresies. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

Woodruff joined in with Bonner's calls for Smith to be taken away, and Bonner said that Smith should do his preaching at the stake. 1563, p. 1259, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1605, 1583, p. 1694.

Smith told Bonner that he should not make up tales about Tankerfield. Bonner told Smith that he had offered Tankerfield a chance for instruction but he dismissed it. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

Woodruff echoed Bonner's call for Smith and Tankerfield to be taken away after their condemnation. 1563, p. 1258, 1570, p. 1874, 1576, 1604, 1583, p. 1694.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Smith). It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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Smith sent his mother-in-law some nutmeg and his daughter some comfets. 1563, pp. 1266-67, 1570, p. 1876, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1701.

Smith's letters and verses: 1563, pp. 1261-67, 1570, pp. 1876-77, 1576, pp. 1606-07 [most of the verses are omitted in 1570 and 1576], 1583, pp. 1695-1702.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Thomas Smith

(1513 - 1577)

Statesman and scholar. Author of De republica Anglorum (DNB)

Sir Thomas Smith was provost of Eton when Robert Smith was in his service. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Actions were taken by Stephen Gardiner against Thomas Smith. 1563, p. 1382, 1570, p. 1951, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1785.

He was cited to appear before the queen?s commissioners on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He was the author of a prayer for the health of Queen Mary and her conceived child printed by Foxe (1563, pp. 1016-17; 1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1410; 1583, p. 1481). [NB: Smith is only identified as the author in the 1563 edition].

 
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Steven Harwood

(d. 1555)

Brewer. Martyr. Of Stratford.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries (including Harwood). The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

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Harwood was examined by Bishop Bonner. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Robert Smith agreed with Harwood's confession. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Harwood was condemned with Thomas Fust, Robert Smith and George Tankerfield. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

He was burned at Stratford. 1563, p. 1268, 1570, p. 1877, 1576, p. 1607, 1583, p. 1702.

[Foxe also refers to him as 'Horwood'.]

 
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Eton
NGR: SU 966 778

A parish in the hundred of Stoke, county of Buckingham. One mile north from Windsor, 23 miles west by south from London.

Chiefly distinguished for its public school. The site upon which the college stands is said to be extraparochial. The college was founded by Henry VI in 1440; the original foundation was for a provost, ten priests, six clerks, six choristers, 25 poor grammar scholars, a master and 25 almsmen.

The living is a rectory in the peculiar jurisdiction and incumbency of the Provost.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1715 [1691]

Queene Mary. Examination of Robert Smith, and Stephen Harwood before the Bishop.

MarginaliaAnno. 1555. Iuly.thed himselfe in it, and calling on the name of the Lord Iesus he was quickely out of payne, &c.

After the martyrdome was ended & that he was fallen a sleepe in the Lord, there were some superstitious old women did blasphemously say that the Deuill was so stronge with him and all such hereticks as he was that they could not feele any payne almost, nor yet be sory for theyr sinnes. 

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Foxe's indignation towards the 'superstitious old women' was aroused because they were explaining away, in a derogatory manner, the stoicism which was a powerful proof of the sanctity of the martyr. [On this stoicism see Collinson (1983) and Freeman (1997)].

The history and examinations of Robert Smith, constantly maynteining the trueth of Gods word, and suffering for the same in the moneth of August. 
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The Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith

Robert Smith's account of his examinations was printed in the Rerum (pp.513-23), as was a note stating that he was burned at Staines on 26 August 1555. With the exception of Smith's letter to 'all which love God unfeignedly', all of the material on Smith in the Acts and Monuments and all of his writings printed by Foxe appeared in the 1563edition. The core of the material on Smith himself was a reprinting of his account of his examinations. Foxe also added a brief introductory account of Smith's life and a graphic description of his execution. (This description, probably derived from an eyewitness, came to Foxe while the Acts and Monuments was being printed and was placed in an appendix at the end of the first edition). None of Smith's verse epistles were printed in the Letters of the Martyrs, but two of his prose letters were reprinted there. The Letters of the Martyrs also printed the letter 'to all which love God unfeignedly' for the first time. In the 1570 edition,the account of Smith's execution was moved from the appendix into the account of Smith, while all of Smith's verse letters were dropped. The 1570 account was reprinted without alteration in the 1576 edition. In the 1583 edition, Smith's verse letters were restored and the letter to 'all which love God unfeignedly' was introduced into the Acts and Monuments.

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MarginaliaRobert Smith of London, Martyr.RObert Smith was brought vnto Newgate the fifte of Nouember, in the first and second yere of the king and queene, by Ioh. Mathew, yeomā of the gard of the quenes side, by the commaundemēt of the Counsell. This Smith first gaue himselfe vnto seruice in the house of sir Thomas Smith knight, being thē Prouost of Eton: from thence he was preferred to Windsore, hauing there in the colledge a clerkship of x. poūd a yere. Of stature he was tall & slēder, actiue about many things, but chiefly delighting in the art of Painting, MarginaliaRobert Smith actiue in the art of paynting.which many times, rather for his minds sake thē for any liuing or lucre, he did practise & exercise. In religion he was feruent, after he had once tasted the trueth: wherin he was much confirmed by the preachings & readings of one M. Turner of Windsore 

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William Turner, a protestant controversialist, a pioneering botanist and the dean of Wells cathedral.

& others: wherupō at the comming of Queene Mary he was depriued of hys Clerkship by her visitors,  
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Officials sent by royal or episcopal authority to inspect the clergy.

& not long after he was apprehended, and brought to examinatiō before Boner,  
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Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 347, middle

This was July 5th, 1555.

as here foloweth, written and testified with his owne hand.

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¶ The first examination of Robert Smith before Bishop Boner.

MarginaliaThe first examination of Rob. Smith before B. Boner.ABout nine of the clocke in the morning, I was among the rest of my brethren brought to the Bishops house: and I first of al was brought before him into his chamber to whom the bishop sayd, as foloweth, after he had asked my name.

Boner. How long is it agoe since the time that ye were cōfessed to any priest?

MarginaliaConfession not needefull.Smith. Neuer since I had yeres of discretion. For I neuer saw it needfull, neither cōmaūded of God to come to shew my faultes to any of that sinfull nūber, whō ye call priests.

Boner. Thou shewest thy selfe euen at the first chop to be a ranke heretick, which being wery of painting, art entred into Diuinity, and so fallen, through thy departing frō thy vocation into heresy.

MarginaliaReiectio criminis ingeniosa & diuina.Smith. Although I haue vnderstanding in þe said occupation, yet (I prayse God) I haue had litle need all my life hitheyto to liue by the same, but haue liued without the same in mine own house as honestly in my vocation, as ye haue liued in yours, and yet vsed the same better then euer you vsed the Pulpit.

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Boner. How long is it ago since ye receiued the sacrament of the aultar, and what is your opinion in the same?

MarginaliaThe Sacrament of the Altar.Smith. I neuer receiued the same since I had yeres of discretion, nor neuer will, by Gods grace: neither do esteeme the same in any poynt, because it hath not gods ordinance, neither in name, nor in other vsage, but rather is set vp & erected to mocke God withall.

Boner. Do ye not beleue that it is the very body of Christe that was borne of the virgin Mary, naturally, substantially and really, after the wordes of consecration?

Smith. I shewed you before it was none of Gods ordynaunces, as ye vse it: thē much lesse to be God, or any part of his substance, but onely bread & wine erected to the vse aforesaid: yet neuerthelesse, if ye can approue it to be the body that ye spake of, by the word, I will beleue it: if not, I will, as I do, accoūt it a detestable Idol, not God, but contrary to God and truth.

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MarginaliaBoners argumēt to proue the Sacrament.Boner. Thē after many raging words & vayne obiectiōs, he sayd there was no remedy but I must be burned.

Smith. Ye shall do no more vnto me, then ye haue done to better mē then either of vs both. But thinke not therby to quench the spirit of god, neither therby to make your matter good. For your sore is too well sene to be healed so priuily wt bloud. For euē the very childrē haue al your deedes in dirision: 

Commentary  *  Close

A fascinating indication (there would be others in the Acts and Monuments) of children taunting Bonner. See Susan Brigden, 'Youth and the English Reformation,' Past and Present 95 (1982), pp. 37-67 for an interesting attempt to link support for the reformation with youthful protest against gerontocratic authority.

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so that although ye patch vp one place with authority, yet shall it breake out in forty to your shame.

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Boner. Then after much ado, & many railing sentences, he sayd throwing away þe paper of mine examinatiō: wel euē now by my truth, euen in good earnest: if thou wilt go and be shriuen, I will teare this paper in peces.

Smith. To which I aunswered: It would be too much to his shame to shew it to men of discretion.

After which aunswere, I was caried downe into the

garden with my Gaoler, & there remayned vntill my brother Harwood 

Commentary  *  Close

Note that this name is given as 'Heralt' in 1563. This person could be the 'Herault' mentioned in a letter of Smith's. This could also be the Thomas Harold mentioned as a protestant prisoner in the Marshalsea (1563, pp. 1145 and 1146; 1570, p. 1756; 1576, p. 1500 and 1583, p. 1584).

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 348, line 17

The first Edition, p. 1253, cols. 1, 2, has "Heralt." {Both 'Heralt' and 'Harwood' occur later in the text.}

was examined: MarginaliaSteuen Harwod examined before the Bishop.& thē being agayn brought vp before the sayd Bishop, he demaunded if I agreed with Harwood in his confession, vpon these articles folowing.

MarginaliaRobert Smith examined by the Bishop.Boner. What say you to the Catholicke church? Do ye not confesse there is one in earth?

Smith. Yes verely, I beleue that there is one Catholicke Church, or faythfull Congregation, which as the Apostle sayth, is builded vpon the Prophets and Apostles, Christ Iesus being the head corner stone: which church in all her wordes and workes, mainteineth the word, and bringeth the same for her authority, & without it doth nothing, nor ought to doe, of which I am assured, I am by grace made a member.

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Boner. Ye shall vnderstand, that I am boūd when my brother offendeth, & will not be reconciled, to bring him before the congregation: now if your Church be the same, MarginaliaWhere was the visible Church amongest the Protestants?where may a man finde it, to bring his brother before the same?

MarginaliaWhere was the visible Church amongest the Apostles?Smith. It is written in the Actes of the Apostles, that whē the tyranny of the Bishops was so great agaynst the churche in * MarginaliaHere he would not aunswere me to the Church of Iury, but flyeth to the 5. of Corinth.Iewry, 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., Judea

they were fayne to congregate in houses & priuy places, as they now do: and yet were they neuerthelesse the Church of God: and seing they had theyr matters redressed being shut vp in a corner, may not we do the like now a dayes?

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Boner. Yea, theyr Church was knowne full wel. For saint Paul writ to the Corinthians to haue the man punished & excommunicate, that had committed euil with his fathers wife. Whereby wee may well perceiue, it was a knowne church, but yours is not knowne.

Smith. Then could ye not persecute it, as ye do: but (as ye say) the Churche of God at Corinth was manifest both to God and Paul: euē so is this Church of God in England whome ye persecute, both knowne to God, and also euen to the very wicked although they know not, nor will not know theyr truth nor conuersation: yea and your sinneful number haue professed theyr verity, and maineteyned the same a long season.

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Boner. Well, thou sayest that the church of God was onely at Corinth when Paul writ vnto them, and so will I put in writing: shall I? 

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Bonner is asking Smith if he is willing to have the statement that the church of God was only at Corinth written into the official record.

Smith. I do maruell greatly, my Lord, that ye are not ashamed to lay snares for your Brethren on this manner. MarginaliaHow Boner layeth snares to catch the innocent.This is now the third snare you haue layd for me. First to make me confesse that the Churche of Englande is not the church of Christ: Secōdly, to say, it is not knowne. Thirdly, to say the church of God is not vniuersall, but particular: and this is not the office of a bishop. For if an innocent had come in your way, you would haue done your best (I see) to haue entangled him.

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Harps. Well frend, quoth one of my Lordes Chapleynes,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, 348, fn 4

Harpsfield

you are no innocent, as it appeareth.

Smith. By the grace of God, I am that I am: & this grace in me, I hope, is not in vayne.

Boner. Well, quoth my Lord, laughing: tell me, how sayst thou of the church.

Smith. I tolde you whereupon the true Church is builded, and I affirme in England to be the congregation of God, and also in Omnem terram, as it is written: Theyr sounde is gone forth into all landes, MarginaliaThe church of Christ is not vniuersally in one particular place.and that this is the afflicted & persecuted Church, which ye cease not to imprison, slay & kyll. And in Corinth was not all the congregation of God, but a number of those holy and elect people of God. For Paul neither Peter were present at Corinth when they wrote, & yet were they of the Church of God, as many thousandes moe, which also communicate in that holy spirit.

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Boner. What call ye Catholick, and what call you church?

Smith. Catholique is vniuersall, and Church is a congregation knit together in vnity.

Then after much like vaine talke, it was layde to my charge, that my felowe and I spake one thing. Whereof I praysed God, and was sent agayne to a garden. Where after a while, as my Brother Harwood and I had bene together, commeth one of my Lords Chapleynes, 

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This 'chaplain' was John Dee, the famous mathematician and astrologer. He was being held in Bonner's household in a glorifed form of house arrest after having been arrested for using astrology to predict the length of Mary's reign. The reason why Foxe disguised Dee's identity in the 1576 edition is discussed in Julian Roberts, 'Bibliographical Aspects of John Foxe' in David Loades, ed., John Foxe and the English Reformation (Aldershot, 1997), p. 49.

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Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, 349, fn 1

"This was Dr. Dee, a conjuror by report." Edit. 1563, p. 1253, and Edit. 1570. - ED.

that much desired to common with me, demaunding first if I were not a prisoner. MarginaliaTalke betweene Robert Smith and the Bishops Chapleyne.

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Smith. I am in this fleshe a Prisoner, and subiecte to my Mayster and yours: but I hope yet the Lordes free man through Christ Iesu.

Doct. I do much desire to talke with you louingly, for because ye are a man that I muche lament, with many other sweet wordes.

To which I aunswered: Sub melle latet venenum 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Robert Smith
Foxe text Latin

Sub melle latet venenum

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2003)

Under the honey poison lies hidden.

And after much ado about his God, I cōpelled him to say, MarginaliaAbsurditye graunted by the Catholickes that the body of Christ goeth into the belly, and so so into the draughte.that it must needs enter into the belly, & so fal into the draught. To which he answered.

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MarginaliaComparisō betweene the Iewes that spit in Christs face and Papists which let fall him into the draught.Doct. What derogation was it to Christ, whē the Iewes spit in his face?

Smith
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