Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesLatin/Greek TranslationsCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Glover

(d. 1555)

Gentleman. Elder brother to Robert Glover, the martyr, and brother to William Glover. Of Mancetter, Warwickshire.

Laurence Saunders sent John and Robert Glover a farewell letter on the morning he was burned.1570, p. 1674; 1576, p. 1428; 1583, p. 1502.

John Glover is described by Foxe as a constant professor of the gospel, who was 'exempted' after his death and cast out of the same church. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1714.

He wanted to take the place of his brother, Robert, but others persuaded him to avoid such risks. A search was then made for him late in Mary's reign by the authorities. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1714.

The mayor of Coventry warned John Glover of his impending arrest. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1714.

John Glover escaped being arrested as he was fit enough to flee, although his brother Robert was ill and so was apprehended. 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

John Glover hid in the woods while the authorities looked for him and examined his wife, Agnes. He died of an ague brought on by hiding in the woods. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

John Careless sent greetings to John Glover in a letter to Augustine Bernher. 1570, pp. 2109-10, 1576, pp. 1820-21.1583, pp. 1927-28.

After his death John Glover was buried in the churchyard but Chancellor Draycot demanded that he be dug up. The priest protested, as Glover had been buried for six weeks and therefore stank, so Draycot insisted that Glover be denounced as damned from the pulpit and then dug up after one year and his bones be thrown over the wall into the highway. This information was given by the parson of the town to Hugh Burrows of Fynden in Derbyshire and to Glover's wife, Agnes, who gave the information to Foxe. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ralph Bayne

(d. 1559)

Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield (1554 - 1559) [DNB]

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College); Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College); Dr Norton (Master of Clare); Dr Philo (Master of Michael House); Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John); Dr Blith (of the King's Hall); Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College); Dr Palmes (Master of St Nicholas hostel); Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's; Brikenden, of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

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Robert Glover believed that after Bayne and Draycot had read his letter to the mayor of Coventry they had decided to attempt to do away with Glover while he was in prison 1570, p. 1888, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he was examined before the bishop of Coventry in Denton's house . 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

Robert Glover was examined and condemned by Draycot and Bayne. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

When friends and family of William Glover tried to have Glover buried in his local church, Bernard, the clerk (whom Foxe believed still to be clerk in 1570), refused his burial. Bernard rode to bishop Raufe Bayne for advice. After two days and one night, Bernard returned with a letter from Bayne which demanded that Glover not be buried in the churchyard. Some of the villagers dragged his body by horse (as it had now begun to stink so badly they could not touch him) and then buried him in a broom field. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Bayne wrote a letter to the parish of Weme. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

Cornelius Bungey was condemned by Ralph Baynes, bishop of Coventry. Articles were raised against Bungey which he answered. 1563, pp. 1282-83, 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1714.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

John Philpot's final examination, on 16 December 1555, was before the bishops of London, Bath, Worcester and Lichfield. 1563, p. 1442, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

John Colstock, Nicholas Ball, Thomas Flyer, Thomas Pyot, Henry Crimes and Thomas Johnson, among others, were examined in the diocese of Lichfield by Ralph Bayne for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1528, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

Bayne persecuted Joan Waste of Derby. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1951.

He is described by Foxe as the cruel bishop of Coventry. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Draycot and Bayne examined the following but later dismissed them: John Adale, Anthony Afterwhittle, Thomas Arch, Thomas Arnal, John Avines, Henry Birdlim, Eustache Bysacre, Julius Dudley, William Enderby, Richard Foxal, John Frankling, Anthony Jones, Richard Kempe, John Leach, Hugh Lynacres, Thomas Lynacres, William Marler, Hugh Moore, William Mosley, Martin Newman, Isabel Parker, Cicely Preston, John Richardson, John Robinson, Thomas Sailter, William Shene, John Stamford, Thomas Steilbe, Thomas Underdone, Francis Ward, Richard Weaver, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Woodburne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

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Robert Aston was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Bayly was examined by Draycot and Bayne and deprived. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Borsley the younger was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Agnes Foreman was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on 12 September 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2141 , 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

Edward Hawkes was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Kaime was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Katrenes was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Mossey was examined and deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Norris was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Anselm Sele was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Slavy was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Smith was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Stiffe was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Waterhouse was examined and forced by Draycot and Bayne to do penance. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Taylor and Henry Tecka were deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

A citation to appear before the bishop was delivered to Joyce Lewes' husband, who furiously insisted that the summoner return it, lest he would force him to eat it, which he forced him to do at dagger-point. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes and her husband were commanded to appear before the bishop. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Although her husband submitted, Joyce Lewes refused. The bishop gave her one month's respite and returned her to her husband, who was bound to the sum of £100 to return her to submit at the end of one month. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

John Glover and others pleaded with Joyce Lewes' husband not to send her to the bishop and so forfeit the money but he refused. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

As Lewes took a drink, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were were examined by the bishop and his chancellor and later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

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Ralph Bayne was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Ralph Bayne died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Hawtrey

Sheriff of Coventry in 1555.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he had spoken with the sheriff [John Parker or Richard Hawtrey] before he was imprisoned. 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, p. 1886-89, 1576, p. 1615-1619, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Glover

(d. 1555)

Martyr. Of Baxterley, Warwickshire; lived in Mancetter, Warwickshire. Married a niece of Latimer's. [DNB]

Laurence Saunders sent John and Robert Glover a farewell letter on the morning Saunders was burned. 1570, p. 1674; 1576, p. 1428; 1583, p. 1502.

Robert Glover was too ill to avoid being apprehended. 1563, p. 1773, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

Robert Glover wrote a letter to his wife. 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he was examined before bishop of Gloucester in Denton's house . 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he spoke with the sheriff [John Parker or Richard Hawtrey] before he was imprisoned. 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that, while he was imprisoned, Hopkins and Dudley spoke to Glover about liberty of conscience. 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that William Brasburge, Katherine Phines and Nicholas Hopkins visited him in prison.1563, p. 1276, 1570, p. 1887, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1711.

Glover wrote a letter to to the mayor of Coventry. 1563, p. 1280, 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1712.

Glover believed that when the bishop of Lichfield and Coventry and the chancellor had read his letter to the mayor of Coventry they had decided to try to do away with Glover while he was in prison. 1570, p. 1888, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

He was sent to Lichfield and received by Telphcot, the chancellor's man sent from Coventry. 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

Telphcot and the bishop's servant, named Persey, were cruel to Glover. Persey became his jailor. 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

The chancellor and a prebendary named Temsey visited him in prison. 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

Telphcot and the jailor spoke to Glover in prison. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p. 1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

The chancellor and Temsey visited Glover and urged him to repent. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p. 1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

Robert Glover was examined and condemned by Draycot and Bayne. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p. 1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

Robert Glover was burned at Coventry with Cornelius Bungey on 19 September 1555. 1563, pp. 1278, 1282, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1713.

Information of Robert Glover's death was given to Foxe by Augustine Bernher. 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1713.

He wrote a letter to his wife [BL, Harley Ms. 416, fos.8r-13r. Printed in 1563, pp. 1273-77 et seq.].

[Brother of John Glover.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Glover

(d. 1555?)

Brother of John and Robert Glover.

William Glover is described by Foxe as a constant professor of the gospel, who was 'exempted' after his death and cast out of the same church. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

He died of natural causes in Weme , Shropshire. He planned to be buried in the local church but Bernard, the clerk (whom Foxe believes still to be clerk in 1570), refused his burial. Bernard rode to bishop Raufe Bayne for advice. In the meantime the body lay in the village for the day. At night Richard Morrice, a taylor, intended to inter him. However, John Thorlye and several others who lived in Weme refused to let Morrice bury Glover. After two days and one night, Bernard returned with a letter from Bayne, which demanded that Glover not be buried in the churchyard. Some of the villagers dragged his body by horse (as it had now begun to stink so badly they could not touch it) and then buried him in a broom field. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Witnesses to William Glover's godly death included Lawrence Nowell, dean of Lichfield; George Wilestone and his wife; Thomas Constantine; Roger Wydouse; John Prynne and George Torpelley. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1714.

1733 [1709]

Queene Mary. The trouble & persecution of M. Rob. Glouer & Ioh. Glouer, in the Dioces of Lichfield.
MarginaliaAnno 1555. September.¶ The persecution and story of M. Robert Glouer Gentleman, and of Iohn Glouer his brother, in the Dioces of Lichfield. 
Commentary  *  Close
The Martyrdom of Robert Glover

Robert Glover was married to Hugh Latimer's niece Mary and was closely tied to people in Latimer's circle, most especially Augustine Bernher, Latimer's amanuensis and confidante. For important background on Mary Glover and her close relationship to her uncle see Susan Wabuda, 'Shunamites and Nurses of the English Reformation: The Activities of Mary Glover Niece of Hugh Latimer' in Diana Webb, ed., Women in the Church, Studies in Church History 37 [Oxford, 1990], pp. 335-44. Richard Bott, Mary Glover's second husband, testified that Hugh Latimer arranged the marriage of Mary to Robert Glover (Wabuda, 'Shunamites,' p. 340). If this is true, it is a powerful indication that Robert Glover held strong evangelical convictions from an early date.

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Robert Glover's letter to his wife, describing his arrest and imprisonment, which is the main source for Foxe's account of his martyrdom, was printed in the Rerum (pp. 525-30 and 533-37). Foxe interrupted the letter to compare Robert Glover with his brother John (Rerum, pp. 530-32). This material was reprinted in the 1563 edition, with Foxe only adding comments that Robert Glover wrote nothing else in prison except this letter and that Glover was burned at Coventry on 19 September (it was actually 20 September). An account of Glover's sudden elation as he walked to the stake came to Foxe while the 1563 edition was being printed and was placed in an appendix to this edition. Augustine Bernher, who is mentioned in the story, was almost certainly Foxe's source for it.

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Glover's letter to his wife was reprinted in the Letters of the Martyrs (pp. 527-42). (A letter to the mayor of Coventry which was part of Robert's letter was printed separately inthe Letters of the Martyrs [p. 542]). A farewell letter from Glover to his wife and children was also printed in Letters of the Martyrs (pp. 542-43), but was never printed by Foxe. In the 1570 edition, Foxe rearranged this material so that the discussion of John and Robert Glover preceded Robert's letter instead of interrupting it. The description of Glover's elation on the way to the stake was expanded and incorporated into the account of Robert Glover. Aware that Bull had uncovered another letter written by Glover in prison, Foxe dropped his statement that Glover had written nothing else in prison and instead declared that he was unable to find official records of Glover's examinations, trial and condemnation. The 1570 account of Robert Glover was printed without change in subsequent editions.

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MarginaliaThe story of M. Robert Glouer Martyr, and of M. Iohn Glouer his brother.VNto this present tyme and moneth of September, pertaineth also the memorable Martyrdome, of M. Rob. Glouer Gentleman, in the Diocesse of Lichfield and Couentry. Of whose apprehensiō and troubles, because I cannot well entreate, but I must also intermixt some mention of his brother Iohn Glouer, for so much as this priuy Commission was chiefly sent down for the said Iohn, and not for Rob. Glouer, (albeit it pleased almighty God that Iohn escaped, and Rob. in his stead was apprehended) I thought therefore in one story to comprehēd them both, in describing some part of their vertuous institution and order of lyfe, and first to begin with Iohn the eldest brother. Who beyng a Gentleman, and heyre to his father, dwellyng in the towne of Mancetor, was endued with fayre possessiōs of worldly goods, but yet much more plentifully enriched with Gods heauenly grace and inward vertues. Which grace of God so working in him, he with hys two other brethren, Rob. and Wil. MarginaliaIohn Glouer, Robert Glouer, William Glouer, 3. godly brethren and zealous professors of the Gospell. not onely receyued and embraced the happy light of Christes holy Gospell, but also most zealously professed, and no lesse diligētly in their liuyng & conuersation followed the same: much vnlike vnto our tablegospellers now adaies, Virtutem qui verba putant, vt lucum ligna, 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Horace, Epistles I. 6. 31 - 32
Foxe text Latin

Virtutem qui verba putant, vt lucum ligna

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2003)

Who think that virtue is just words, as a grove is trees.

Actual text of Horace, Epistles, Book I. 6. 31-2

virtutem verba putas et lucum ligna:

as Horace sayth.  
Commentary  *  Close

Foxe is paraphrasing Horace (Epistles I, no. 6, line 31): 'virtutem verba putas et Lucum ligna' [you think that virtue is (merely) words and a sacred grove (merely) trees]. Foxe's version makes little grammatical sense but if one assumes that 'ut' is a printer's error for 'et' then Foxe's version reads: 'who think that virtue is [merely] words and a sacred grove [merely] trees'.

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Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, 384, fn 1

Lib. i. Epist. vi. 31. - ED.

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And as touchyng this foresayde Iohn Glouer (who through his manifold afflictions, seemed to haue a deeper taste and contemplation of spirituall thyngs, ioyned with mortification from all worldly cares more then the other had) although sufficient relatiō be made before in our first edition to be seene, yet as concernyng his spirituall conflicts, and the Lordes gracious workyng in hym, because the consideration thereof, is both worthy of memory, and the example may worke experience peraduenture to the comfort of the godly, it shal not be hurtful to reherse some part of the same. MarginaliaTouching further mention of M. Iohn Glouer, read in the first edition. So it pleased God to lay his heauy hand of inward afflictions and greuous passions vpon this mā that though he suffred not the paynes of the outward fire, as his brother and other Martyrs did: yet if we consider what inwardly in spirit and mynd this man felt & suffred, MarginaliaThe inward conflictes and exercises of M. Iohn Glouer.and that of so long tyme, he may well be counted with hys brother Rob. for a Martyr, beyng no lesse desirous wt hym of the same Martyrdome: yea, & in comparison may seme to be chronicled a double Martyr.

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MarginaliaIohn Glouer a double Martyr.For as the sayd Rob. was spedily dispatched with the sharpe and extreme torments of the fire in a short tyme, so this no lesse blessed Saint of God, what and how muche more greuous pangs, what sorrowfull tormentes, what boyling heates of the fire of hell in hys spirit inwardly he felt and sustayned, no speech outwardly is able to expresse. 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe's accounts of both Robert and John Glover are very preoccupied with the issue of the spirtual despair into which the godly fell. For Foxe's concern with this problem, see the introductory essay to this edition on Foxe's life.

MarginaliaA heauy Crosse of inward tormentes layd vpō Iohn Glouer.Being yong, I remember I was once or twise with him, 
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This is a fascinating autobiographical titbit. Foxe either was in the Coventry area briefly in 1547 or he might have traveled to Warwick during Edward VI's reign; he could have met John in either period.

who partly by hys talke I perceiued, and partly by myne owne eyes saw to be so worne and consumed by the space of fiue yeares, that neither almost any brookyng of meate, quietnes of sleepe, pleasure of lyfe, yea and almost no kynd of senses was left in hym. And doubtlesse I haue greatly wondered oftentymes at the meruailous workes and operation of Christ shewed vpon hym, who vnlesse he had relieued betymes his poore wretched seruant so far worne, with some opportune consolation, now and then betwixt, it could not possible bee, that he should haue susteined so vntollerable paynes and tormentes. And yet the occasion thereof was not of so great moment and weight. MarginaliaThe better conscience the sooner disquieted.But this we see common among holy & blessed men, how the more deuout and godly they are, hauing the feare of God before their eyes, the more suspition and mistrust they haue of thē selues: whereby it commeth to passe, that often they are so terrified & perplexed with small matters, as though they were huge mountains: where as contrary others there be, whom most hainous & very sore crimes in deed do nothyng touch or stirre at all.

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MarginaliaThe first occasiō of Iohn Glouers inward afflictiō.The occasion of this was, that he beyng first called by the light of the holy spirit to the knowledge of the gospell, and hauyng receiued a wonderous sweet feeling of Christes heauenly kyngdom, hys mynd after that fallyng a little to some cogitation of his former affayres belongyng to hys vocation, began by & by to misdoubt hymselfe vpō the occasion of these words written in the 7. to the Hebrues: For it cannot be that they which were once illumined, and haue tasted the heauenly gift, &c. MarginaliaHeb. 7.Vpon the consideration of which words he fully perswaded himselfe, that he had sinned verely against the holy Ghost: euen so much, that if hee had bene in the deepest pit of hell, he could almost haue dispaired no more of hys saluation. Here redily euery good man may iudge of hymselfe, what terrors, boylings, & conuul-

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sions turmoiled in the meane tyme in his wofull brest: although it be hard for any mā to iudge the greuousnes therof, vnlesse he which hath experience of the lyke.

MarginaliaNo griefe lyke to the griefe of conscience.In comparing now the torments of all Martyrs with his paynes, I pray you what paynes, punishment, and flames would not he willingly haue suffered, to haue had some refocillation 

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Refreshment, revival [OED].

and tyme of refreshyng? Who in suche intollerable griefes of mynd, although he neyther had nor could haue any ioy of hys meate, yet was he compelled to eate against hys appetite, to the end to differe the tyme of his damnation, so long as he might, thinking with hymself no lesse, but that he must needs be thrown into hell, the breth beyng once out of the body. Albeit Christ he thought did pity his case, and was sory for hym: yet he could not (as he imagined) helpe, because of the veritie of the word, which sayd: It cannot be, &c. MarginaliaHeb. 7.

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And this I rehearse of hym not so much to open hys wounds and sorrowes, as for that by his example all wee with hym may glorifie the sonne of God, MarginaliaChrist a mercifull helper in temptations and hard distresses.who suffereth none to be tempted aboue hys strength, but so tempereth and seasoneth the asperitie of euyls, that what seemeth to vs intollerable, not onely he doth alleuate the same, that we may beare it, but also turneth it to our further commoditie then we can thinke. Which well appered in this good seruaunt of God, in no man more. Who albeit (as we haue sayd) suffred many yeres so sharpe temptations & strong buffetyngs of Sathan: yet the Lord, who graciously preserued hym all the whyle, not onely at last did rid him out of all discomfort, MarginaliaIohn Glouer by the grace of Christ restored agayne to perfect tranquilitye.but also framed hym thereby to such mortification of lyfe, as the lyke lightly hath not bene seene, in such sort as he beyng lyke one placed in heauen alredy and dead in this world, both in word and meditation led a life altogether celestiall, abhorryng in hys mynd all prophane doyngs. Neither was his talke any thyng discrepant frō the fruits of his lyfe, throwyng out neuer any idle, vyle, or vayne language. The most part of hys landes he distributed to the vse of hys brethren, and committed the rest to the guidyng of hys seruauntes and officers, whereby the more quietly he myght geue hymselfe to hys godly study, as to a continuall Saboth rest. This was about the latter end of K. Henries raigne, and continued a great part of the tyme of K. Edward 6.

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After this in the persecuting dayes of Queene Mary, as soone as the B. of Couentry heard þe fame of this Iohn aforesayde beyng so ardent and zealous in the Gospell of Christ, eftsoones he wrote his letter to the Maior and Officers of Couentry to apprehend hym as soone as myght be. But it chaunced otherwyse by Gods holy prouidence, disposing all thyngs after hys owne secret pleasure, who seyng his old and trusty seruaunt so many yeares with so extreme and many torments broken and dried vp, would in no wyse heape too many sorrowes vpon one poore sillie wretch: neyther would commit hym to the flames of fire, who had bene already baked and scorched with the sharpe fires of inward affliction, and had sustained so many burnyng dartes and conflictes of Sathan so many yeares. God therefore of hys diuine prouidence thinkyng it too much that one man should be so much ouercharged wyth so many plagues and tormentes, did graciously prouide, that Robert his brother beyng stronger of body, and also better furnished with helpes of learnyng to aunswer the aduersaries (beyng a Maister of Arte in Cambridge) should sustaine that conflict, 

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It is fascinating that Foxe is equating the torments of a guilty conscience with martyrdom.

and euen so it came to passe, as ye shall heare.

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For as soone as the Maior of Cauentry had receyued the Byshops letters for the apprehendyng of M. Iohn Glouer, he sent forthwith a priuy watchword 

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I.e., a secret warning.

to the sayde Iohn to conuey away hymselfe. MarginaliaThe Mayor of Couentry sendeth a priuy watchword to Iohn Glouer. Who with hys brother William, was not so soone departed out of hys house: but that yet in sight of the shiriffe and other, the serchers came and rushed in to take hym, accordyng to the bishops commandement.

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But when the sayde Iohn could in no place be found, one of the Officers goyng into an vpper chamber, founde there Robert the other brother lying on hys bed: & sicke of a long disease, who was by hym incontinent 

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Immediately.

brought before the Shiriffe. MarginaliaM. Robert Glouer apprehended lying sicke in his chamber. Which Shiriffe notwithstandyng fauouryng Robert and hys cause, would in deed fayne haue dismissed hym, and wrought what meanes he could, saying, that he was not the man for whome they were sent: Yet neuerthelesse beyng feared wich the stoute wordes of the officer contendyng with hym to haue hym stayed tyll the bishops commyng, he was constrained to cary him away agaynst his will, and so layed hym fast while the Bishop came. And thus much by the way of preamble first concernyng the woorthy remembraunce of maister Iohn Glouer.

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Now to enter the matter which principally we haue in

hand,
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