Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bernard

Curate of the parish of Weme, Shropshire.

When William Glover died of natural causes, Bernard (whom Foxe believed still to be curate in 1583) refused to allow his burial in consecrated ground. 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
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Edward Bourton

(d. 1558)

Esquire. Of Shrewsbury.

Edward Bourton died the day before Elizabeth was due to be crowned. He desired to be buried in his parish church - St Chad's, Shrewsbury - with no 'massmonger' present. This was declared to the curate, Sir John Marshall, who would then not bury him on the day of Elizabeth's coronation. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Bourton's friend, George Torpelley, berated the priest of St Chad's, Shrewsbury, for refusing to bury Bournton in consecrated ground. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

Bourton was buried in his own garden. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
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George Torpelley

George Torpelley was a witness to William Glover's godly death. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

He was a friend of Edward Bourton who berated the curate of St Chad's, Shrewsbury, for refusing to bury Bourton in the church. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p.1620 , 1583, p. 1714.

 
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George Wilestone

George Wilestone was a witness to William Glover's godly death. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
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John Christopherson

(d. 1558)

Master of Trinity College, Cambridge (1553 ? 1558); bishop of Chichester (1557 - 1558). Master of Trinity College (1553 - 1558). Dean of Norwich (1554 - 1557). Chaplain and confessor to Queen Mary. (DNB)

Christopherson was sent to Cambridge University by Stephen Gardiner with articles ordering that every scholar wear the proper vestments, pronounce Greek in the traditional pronounciation and declare the whole style of the king and queen in their sermons (1563, p. 1007; 1570, pp. 1646-47; 1576, p 1405; and 1583, p. 1475).

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John Christopherson condemned Robert Pygot and William Wolsey on 9 October 1555. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

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John Christopherson was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Christopherson attempted to sprinkle scholars of Trinity College with holy water at the gatehouse to the college, but they refused it. Nicholas Carre wrote a letter to John Cheke about Martin Bucer, which was then passed on to Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Scot, Watson and Christopherson discussed and agreed to the exhumation of Bucer and Phagius. . 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Christopherson did not attend King's College on 14 January 1557 with the other commissioners. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

He was taken sick during Watson's Candlemas sermon and began babbling. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

Some present at Watson's sermon said that Christopherson had become sick because he had been accused of false accounting at the college and that he had witnessed his brother-in-law's lease being cancelled on the manor of the college because the covenants seemed unreasonable. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

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Richard Woodman's first examination before Christopherson, Story, Cooke and others took place on 14 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1573-79, 1570, p. 2174-78, 1576, pp. 1877-81, 1583, pp. 1986-89.

Woodman's second examination before Christopherson and two of his chaplains, as well as Story, took place on 27 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1582-87, 1570, pp. 2178-82, 1576, pp. 1881-84, 1583, pp. 2089-92.

The sixth and last examination of Woodman took place before Chichester, Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. 1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

He accused and examined several prisoners in Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

He died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
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John Fuller

(d. 1558)

Master of Jesus College, Cambridge. Chancellor of Ely. [DNB]

John Fuller examined Pygot and Wolsey about their doctrinal beliefs. 1570, pp. 1893-94, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Fuller gave Wolsey a book [Dr. Watson's Book of Sermons or Homilies] to read. That night when Fuller returned to Wolsey, he saw that Wolsey had crossed out the content of the book. Fuller called him a heretic. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Fuller gave Wolsey the chance to avoid being examined, which Wolsey refused. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

During Easter week William Wolsey conferred with Fuller, Christopherson and Dr Young. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Fuller condemned Pygot and Wolsey on 9 October 1555. 1563, p. 1283 [states around 4 October], 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

He sent Wolsey to Ely prison until his execution. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

 
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John Marshall

Curate of St Chad's, Shrewsbury.

John Marshall refused to bury Edward Bourton and was berated for this act by George Torpelley. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
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John Prynne

John Prynne was witness to William Glover's godly death. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
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John Thorlyne

John Thorlyne refused to let Richard Morrice bury William Glover at night. 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
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John Young

(1514 - 1580)

DD (1553). Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge (1536). Original founder of Trinity College, Cambridge (1546). Vice-chancellor of Cambridge (1553 - 1554). Master of Pembroke College, Cambridge (1554 - 1559). Regius professor of divinity (1555). Deprived of all preferments under Elizabeth. Imprisoned (1561 - 1579). Removed to Wisbech castle and died there. (DNB)

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On 3 October 1553, Young challenged one 'maister Pierson' for ministering communion in his parish and refusing to say mass. On 5 October Pierson was discharged from his living (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

On 26 October 1553, John Young, acting on Stephen Gardiner's authority and in the presence of a Dr Walker, discharged John Madew as Master of Clare on the grounds that he was married. Madew was replaced by Roland Swynborne (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

On 31 October 1553 Young sharply reproved one 'maister Thrackolde' for challenging Young over his lenient treatment of Henry Bovell. Bovell had refused to swear to Mary's supremacy over the English church, as was still required by statute (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

On 3 November 1553 Young ordered the curate of the Round Church in Cambridge not to minister in the vernacular and declared that all services in Cambridge town were to be held in Latin (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

On 12 January 1554, Young called a congregation general at Cambridge, and ordered that a mass of the Holy Ghost be celebrated there on 18 February, Mary's birthday. This was done (1563, p. 1000; 1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

John Young was one of the official disputants in the Oxford disputations of April 1554 (1563, pp. 932, 936-38 and 951-53; 1570, pp. 1591-93 and 1602-4; 1576, pp. 1358-59 and 1367-68; 1583, pp. 1428-30 and 1438-39).

[NB: A brief account of the Oxford disputations of 1554, printed only in 1563, mentions Young debating with Cranmer (1563, p. 933)].

According to Foxe, Young was present when William Glynn visited Ridley and asked Ridley's forgiveness for having spoken to him disrespectfully during Ridley's disputation on 17 April 1554 (1563, p. 971; 1570, p. 1618; 1576, p. 1380; 1583, p. 1451).

During Easter week William Wolsey conferred with Fuller, Christopherson and Dr Young. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Young told Wolsey that laymen should not meddle with scripture, to which Wolsey counter-argued using scripture. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Young was one of those who put the common seal of the University of Cambridge to the condemnation of Bucer and Phagius. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

John Young was present for the judgement against Bucer and Phagius on 17 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

When the commission found no witnesses to support Bucer and Phagius, they called aside DrsYoung, Sedgwick, Bullock, Taylor, Maptide, Hunter, Parker, Redman, as well as Brown, Gogman, Rud, Johnson, Mitch, Raven and Carre. They were all commanded to give witness against Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

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On 14 January 1557, after the examination of the provost and vice-provost of Cambridge, Thomas Bacon invited Perne, Dr Young, Dr Harvey, Swinborne, and Maptide to come to dinner. His examination took place before Scot, Watson and Christopherson on 14 January 1557. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

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John Hullier appeared before Shaxton, Young, Segewick, Scot, Mitch and others on Palm Sunday eve at Great St Mary's. 1570, p. 2196, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2004.

 
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Lawrence Nowell

(d. 1576)

Dean of Lichfield. Of Lancashire. [DNB]

Lawrence Nowell was a witness to William Glover's godly death. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
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Mrs Wilestone

Wife of George Wilestone.

Mrs Wilestone was a witness to William Glover's godly death. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
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Nicholas Shaxton

(1485? - 1556)

Bishop of Salisbury (1535 - 1539). Almoner to Anne Boleyn. [DNB]

Shaxton condemned Pygot and Wolsey on 9 October 1555. 1563, p. 1283 [states around 4 October], 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

Bishop Shaxton resigned his post after Latimer resigned his. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1739.

Henry VIII appointed Richard Stokesley (Bishop of London), Stephen Gardiner (Bishop of Winchester), Richard Sampson (Bishop of Chichester), William Repps (Bishop of Norwich), Thomas Goodrich (Bishop of Ely), Hugh Latimer (Bishop of Worcester), Nicholas Shaxton (Bishop of Salisbury) and William Barlow (Bishop of St David's) to compose a book of ecclesiastical institutions called the Bishops' Book. 1563, p. 1472.

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Oliver Richardyne

(d. 1555)

Martyr. Of the parish of Whitchurch, Wiltshire.

Oliver Richardyne was burned at Hartford West during the reign of Henry VIII. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
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Ralph Bayne

(d. 1559)

Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield (1554 - 1559) [DNB]

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College); Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College); Dr Norton (Master of Clare); Dr Philo (Master of Michael House); Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John); Dr Blith (of the King's Hall); Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College); Dr Palmes (Master of St Nicholas hostel); Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's; Brikenden, of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

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Robert Glover believed that after Bayne and Draycot had read his letter to the mayor of Coventry they had decided to attempt to do away with Glover while he was in prison 1570, p. 1888, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he was examined before the bishop of Coventry in Denton's house . 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

Robert Glover was examined and condemned by Draycot and Bayne. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

When friends and family of William Glover tried to have Glover buried in his local church, Bernard, the clerk (whom Foxe believed still to be clerk in 1570), refused his burial. Bernard rode to bishop Raufe Bayne for advice. After two days and one night, Bernard returned with a letter from Bayne which demanded that Glover not be buried in the churchyard. Some of the villagers dragged his body by horse (as it had now begun to stink so badly they could not touch him) and then buried him in a broom field. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Bayne wrote a letter to the parish of Weme. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

Cornelius Bungey was condemned by Ralph Baynes, bishop of Coventry. Articles were raised against Bungey which he answered. 1563, pp. 1282-83, 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1714.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

John Philpot's final examination, on 16 December 1555, was before the bishops of London, Bath, Worcester and Lichfield. 1563, p. 1442, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

John Colstock, Nicholas Ball, Thomas Flyer, Thomas Pyot, Henry Crimes and Thomas Johnson, among others, were examined in the diocese of Lichfield by Ralph Bayne for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1528, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

Bayne persecuted Joan Waste of Derby. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1951.

He is described by Foxe as the cruel bishop of Coventry. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Draycot and Bayne examined the following but later dismissed them: John Adale, Anthony Afterwhittle, Thomas Arch, Thomas Arnal, John Avines, Henry Birdlim, Eustache Bysacre, Julius Dudley, William Enderby, Richard Foxal, John Frankling, Anthony Jones, Richard Kempe, John Leach, Hugh Lynacres, Thomas Lynacres, William Marler, Hugh Moore, William Mosley, Martin Newman, Isabel Parker, Cicely Preston, John Richardson, John Robinson, Thomas Sailter, William Shene, John Stamford, Thomas Steilbe, Thomas Underdone, Francis Ward, Richard Weaver, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Woodburne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

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Robert Aston was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Bayly was examined by Draycot and Bayne and deprived. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Borsley the younger was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Agnes Foreman was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on 12 September 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2141 , 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

Edward Hawkes was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Kaime was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Katrenes was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Mossey was examined and deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Norris was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Anselm Sele was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Slavy was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Smith was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Stiffe was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Waterhouse was examined and forced by Draycot and Bayne to do penance. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Taylor and Henry Tecka were deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

A citation to appear before the bishop was delivered to Joyce Lewes' husband, who furiously insisted that the summoner return it, lest he would force him to eat it, which he forced him to do at dagger-point. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes and her husband were commanded to appear before the bishop. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Although her husband submitted, Joyce Lewes refused. The bishop gave her one month's respite and returned her to her husband, who was bound to the sum of £100 to return her to submit at the end of one month. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

John Glover and others pleaded with Joyce Lewes' husband not to send her to the bishop and so forfeit the money but he refused. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

As Lewes took a drink, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were were examined by the bishop and his chancellor and later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

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Ralph Bayne was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Ralph Bayne died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
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Richard Everard

Gentleman

According to Foxe, William Wolsey was brought to death by the procurement of Richard Everard, who mistreated Wolsey and ordered him to produce sureties of good behaviour, which Wolsey refused to do. 1570, pp. 1893-94, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

[No one of this name was a JP in Mary's reign.]

 
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Richard Morrice

Taylor of Weme, Shropshire.

Richard Morrice tried unsuccessfully to bury the body of William Glover secretly at night. 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
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Robert Pygot

(d. 1555)

Painter. Martyr. Of Wisbeach.

Pygot was presented at Wisbeach Easter-week assizes, 1555, for not going to church. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Robert Pygot appeared before the judge, Sir Clement Higham, who sent him to Ely prison until his execution. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Pygot and Wolsey were visited in prison by a chaplain of Bishop Goodricke's, Peter Valentius, who was of French birth, and who was almoner there for twenty years prior to his meeting with them. Valentius questioned them on their beliefs. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

On 9 October 1555 Pygot was called before Fuller, Shaxton, Christopherson and others of the commission, who examined Pygot and Wolsey about their doctrinal beliefs. 1570, pp. 1893-94, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Peacock preached at the execution of Pygot and Wolsey. 1570, pp. 1893-94, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

When Pygot and Wolsey were bound to the stake, Wolsey was spoken to by Richard Collinson, a destitute priest without living or residence, as he was concerned for Wolsey's doctrinal errors. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

Books were burned with Pygot and Wolsey [probably New Testaments], one of which each man held to his breast in the flames. 1563, p. 1284, 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Witnesses and informers of the death of Pygot and Wolsey were: Robert Scortred, Robert Crane, Edward Story, Robert Kendall, and Richard Best. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Steward

(d. 1557)

Dean of Ely (1541 - 1557)

Robert Steward condemned Robert Pygot and William Wolsey on 9 October 1555. 1570, pp. 1893-94, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Roger Wydouse

Roger Wydouse was a witness to William Glover's godly death. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Clement Higham

(by 1495 - 1571)

Of Barrow, Suffolk. MP for Rye (1553), Ipswich (1554), West Looe (1554), Lancaster (1555). Chief bailiff of Bury St Edmunds, JP Suffolk (1529 - 1571). (Bindoff)[SP11/5, no. 6].

Robert Pygot appeared before the judge, Sir Clement Higham, who sent him to Ely prison until his execution. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

The examination of John Fortune was carried out by Bishop Hooper, aided by Doctor Parker, Master Foster and Master Hygham. 1570, p. 2100, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, p. 1918.

David and John Henry, Philip Humphrey were arrested for heresy. The writ for Humphrey's burning was signed by Sir Clement Higham. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Alice Driver rebuked Queen Mary, for which the chief justice, Sir Clement Higham, ordered her ears to be cut off. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

At Bury St Edmunds, Clement Higham met with the witnesses against Cooper, Richard White of Wattisham and Grimwood of Hitcham, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Cooper was condemned to be hanged, drawn and quartered as an example to others. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir John Ygone

Sir John Ygone was sheriff [in the county of Salop] at the time of the death of Oliver Richardyne, during the latter years of Henry VIII's reign. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Constantine

Constantine was a witness to William Glover's godly death. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Wolsey

(d. 1555)

Martyr. Constable, dwelling in Wells, but removed to Wisbeach.

William Wolsey was condemned by John Fuller, the bishop's chancellor of Ely, Dr Shaxton, the suffragen, Robert Steward, dean of Ely, and John Christopherson, dean of Norwich on 9 October 1555. 1563, p. 1283 [states around 4 October], 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

He was brought to death by his procurement of Richard Everard, gentleman and justice, who originally requested surities of Wolsey, and brought him to live in Wisbeach. Wolsey refused to give surities and so was imprisoned during assizes at Ely that Lent. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

During Easter week William Wolsey conferred with Fuller, Christopherson and Dr Young. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Young told Wolsey that laymen should not meddle with scripture, to which Wolsey counter-argued using scripture. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Fuller gave Wolsey a book [Dr Watson's Book of Sermons or Homilies] to read. That night when Fuller returned to Wolsey, he saw that Wolsey had crossed out the content of the book. Fuller called him a heretic. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Fuller gave Wolsey the chance to avoid being examined, which Wolsey refused. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Fuller sent Wolsey to Ely prison until his execution. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Wolsey was visited in prison by a chaplain of Bishop Goodricke's, Peter Valentius, who was of French birth, and who was almoner there for twenty years prior to this meeting. Valentius questioned his beliefs. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Wolsey was called before Fuller (then chancellor), Shaxton, Christopherson, and others of the commission on 9 October 1555. They examined both Wolsey and Pygot about their doctrinal beliefs. 1570, pp. 1893-94, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

William Wolsey was burned with Robert Pygot. 1563, p. 1283, 1570, pp. 1893-4, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

Peacock preached at the execution of Wolsey and Pygot. 1570, pp. 1893-94, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

When Wolsey and Pygot were bound to the stake, Wolsey was spoken to by Richard Collinson, a destitute priest without living or residence, as he was concerned for his doctrinal errors. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

Books were burned with Wolsey and Pygot (probably New Testaments), one of which each man held to his breast in the flames. 1563, p. 1284, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

Witnesses and informers of the death of Wolsey (and Pygot) were: Robert Scortred, Robert Crane, Edward Story, Robert Kendall, and Richard Best. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

A further account of the imprisonment and death of Wolsey and Pygot was given by Thomas Hodilo and William Fulke. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, pp. 1621-2,1583, p. 1715.

Hodilo visited Wolsey in prison in Ely and was given some money by Wolsey for Hodilo to distribute to Wolsey's wife, kinsfolk and friends. Wolsey also gave him six shillings and eight pence to give to Richard Denton. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, pp. 1621-2,1583, p. 1715.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Eccles, Eccletch
NGR: SJ 765 988

A parish in the hundred of Salford, county Palatine of Lancaster, 4 miles west of Manchester, comprising two chapelries and three townships. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Chester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Hereford [Herforde; Herford]

County town of Herefordshire; cathedral city

OS grid ref: SO 515 405

 
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St Chaddes [St Chad's Church, Shrewsbury]
NGR: SJ 492 132

Perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry of Salop, diocese of Coventry and Lichfield, and in the patronage of the Crown. The present church was built in 1792.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Weme [Wem]
NGR: SJ 515 290

A parish partly in the hundred of Pimhill, but chiefly in the Whitchurch division of the hundred of Bradford North in the county of Salop. 11 miles north by east from Shrewsbury. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Salop, Diocese of Coventry and Lichfield.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Whitchurch
NGR: SJ 540 420

A parish, comprising the market town of Whitchurch, 10 townships and one chapelry, in the Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, county of Salop. 20 miles north by east from Shrewsbury. The living is a rectory, with that of Marbury annexed in the Archdeaconry of Salop, diocese of Coventry and Lichfield.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wisbech
NGR: TF 460 096

A town in the hundred of Wisbech, Isle of Ely and county of Cambridge. 44 miles north from Cambridge. Wisbech comprises the parishes of St Mary and St Peter, in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Ely. The living of St Peter is a vicarage, with the perpetual curacy of St Mary and the chapelry of Guyhirn annexed.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1739 [1715]

Queene Mary. The life and story of William Wolsey, and Robert Pygot Martyrs.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. Septembernerd, being then Curate of the sayd Church MarginaliaBernard a Popish Curate of Weme.(and is yet as I heare to say to this day) to stoppe the buriall therof, rode to the bishop named Raufe Bayne, to certify him of the matter, and to haue his aduise therein. In the meane time, the body lying there a whole daye, in the night time one Rich. Morice a Taylour woulde haue enterred him. But then came MarginaliaIohn Thorlyne agaynst the burying of W. Glouers brother.Iohn Thorlyne of Weme with other moe, & woulde not suffer the body to be buryed: expressing to vs þe contrary examples of good Toby, for as he was religious in buriyng the dead so this man putteth religiō in not burying the dead: so that after he had layne there two dayes & one night, commeth the foresayd Bernerd the Curate with the Bishops letter, the contentes of which letter beyng copied out word for word here foloweth. 

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The letter was probably copied by one of Foxe's informants and the copy sent to Foxe.

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A copy of the Byshops Letter written to the Parish of Weme.

MarginaliaThe letter of Raufe Bayne B. of Chester, for the not burying of W. Glouers body.VNderstanding that one Glouer an heretick is dead in the parish of Weme, whiche Glouer hath for all the time of my being in this country bene knowne for a rebellion agaynst our holy fath and Religion, a Contemner of the holy Sacramentes and ceremonies vsed in holy Churche, and hath separate himselfe frō the holy Communion of all good Christian men, nor neuer required to be reconciled to our mother holy Church, nor in hys last dayes did not call for his ghostly father, but dyed without all rites belonging to a Christian man: I thought it good not only to commaund the Curate of Weme that he shoulde not be buried in Christian mans buriall, but also will and commaunde all the parish of Weme that no manne procure, helpe, nor speake to haue him buried in holy ground: but I do charge and commaund the Church Wardens of Weme in speciall, and all the parishe of the same that they assist the sayd Curate in defending and letting, and procuring that he bee not buried neither in the Churche nor within the wanybles 

Commentary  *  Close

Lands, precincts

of the Churchyarde, and likewise I charge those that brought the body to the place, to cary it away agayne, and that at theyr charge: as they will aunswere at theyr perill. At Eccletch this 6. of September. an 1558.

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By your Ordinary Radulph Co-
uentry and Liechfield. 

Commentary  *  Close

Ralph Baynes, the bishop of Coventry and Lichfield.

MarginaliaThe dead corpes of W. Glouer dragged with horse into the field.By þe vertue of this foresaid letter so it fel out, that they which brought the corps thither, were fayne at their owne charges to carye it backe agayne. But for so muche as the body was corrupted, and smelt so strongly that vnneth any man might come nere it, they were forced to draw it wt horses vnto a bromefield, 

Commentary  *  Close

Broom is a wild shrub.

and there was he buried.

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Witnesses of the godly end of the sayde William Glouer dying in the true fayth and confession of Christe, Mayster Nowell Deane of Liechfielde, George Wilestone and hys wife, Tho Cōstantine, Roger Wydouse, Iohn Prynne, George Torpelley. 

Commentary  *  Close

George Torpelly was Foxe's source for the refusal to bury both William Glover and Edward Burton.

&c.

MarginaliaM. Edward Burton not suffered to be buryed in Christian buriall, the same day when Q. Elizabeth was crowned.The like example of charitable affection in these catholicke churchmen is also to be sene and noted in the burying of one mayster Edward Bourton Esquire, who in þe same Diocesse of Chester departing out of this worlde the verye day before Queene Elizabeth was crowned, required of his frendes, as they would aunswere for it, that his bodye should be buryed in his Parishe Churche (which was S. Chaddes in Shrousbury) so that no Massemonger should be present therat. Which thing being declared to the Curat of that Parish named sir Iohn Marshal, & the body being withall brought to the buriall, 

Commentary  *  Close

In the errata printed in the 1576 edition, Foxe printed a correction stating that Burton's body was not actually sent to the church but that a messenger, one John Torperly (probably a relative of George Torpelly), was sent to ask if Burton would be allowed a Christian burial and that permission was denied. Probably the curate of St Chad protested to Foxe or Day about the account of this which appeared in the 1570 edition. This correction was never added to the story of Burton in Foxe's text.

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Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 402, line 13

In the table of errata to the edition of 1576 it is stated: "Whereas it is mentioned of Maister Edward Bourton Esquier, that he was brought to the church and there denyed Christian burial: understand (gentle reader) that he was not brought to the place of burial, but only a messenger whose name is John Torperley was sent to know whether he should be buried in Christian burial or not: whych being denyed him, he was therefore buried in his own garden, as is declared in the page abovre mentioned."

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vpon the same day whē the Queene 
Commentary  *  Close

Elizabeth I.

was crowned, the Curate being therwith offended, sayd playnely that he should not be buried in þe church there. Whereunto one of his frendes, named George Torpelley answering againe said, that God would iudge him in the last day. &c. Then the priest, Iudge God (saith he) or Deuill, the body shall not come there. And so they buryed him in his owne garden. Where he is no doubt as neare þe kingdome of heauen, as if he had bene buried the middest of the Church.

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MarginaliaOliuer Richardine in Hartford West. Martyr.Moreouer, in the sayd County of Salop, I finde that one Olyuer Richardyne 

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This terse account is all the information known about the obscure Oliver Richardine.

of the Parish of Whitchurch was burned in Hartford Weste, Syr Iohn Ygone being Sheriffe the same time. Whiche seemeth to be about the latter yeare of king Henry viij. Whose name because it was not mentioned before, I thought here to geue some litle touch of him,  
Commentary  *  Close

This brief story must have been given to Foxe as the 1570 edition was being printed and he inserted it into the text (far out of chronological order) as soon as he could.

hauing now in hande to speake of the persecution within the Diocesse of Couentry and Liechfield.

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¶ The Martyrdome of William Wolsey, and Robert Pygot Paynter. 
Commentary  *  Close
The Martyrdoms of Wolsey and Pygot

The Rerum simply has a note stating that William Wolsey, weaver, and Robert Pygot, painter, were burned on 19 September 1555 (Rerum, p. 538). In the 1563 edition this note was repeated, mistakenly giving Wolsey's first name as 'Thomas' and correcting the date of their execution to 4 October 1555. (The actual date was 16 October 1555). Foxe provided his full account of Wolsey and Pygot in the 1570 edition. It appears to have been based on personal testimony for the background and examinations of Wolsey and Pygot; some of Foxe's informants were listed in his account. (Fortunately the official records for the trials of Wolsey and Pygot survive - Ely Diocesan Register G 1/8, fos. 81r-84r - and they confirm the accuracy of Foxe's account at several points. However, it is pretty evident that Foxe did not have access to these materials but to an independent source of information, as his account contains material not in the official records). Foxe also obtained a description of the execution of Wolsey and Pygot from the famous Cambridge puritan divine William Fulke. The account of Wolsey and Pygot was not altered in the 1576 and 1583 editions.

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MarginaliaWilliam Wolsey, Robert Pigot, Martyrs.AFter the sufferyng of Mayster Robert Glouer & Cornelius Bongey at Couentrye, followeth next the condemnation of other two blessed Martyrs which were iud-

ged and condemned at Eley by Iohn Fuller the Bishops Chauncellour of Eley, Doctor Shaxton his Suffragane, Robert Steward Deane of Eley, Iohn Christopherson Deane of Norwich. &c. an. 1555. October 9. the names of which martyrs were William Wolsey and Robert Pygot, dwelling both in the Towne of Wisbich, whiche William Wolsey being a constable, dwelling and inhabiting in the Towne of Well, was there brought to death by the meanes and procurement of one MarginaliaRichard Euerard extreame agaynst Williā Wolsey.Richard Euerard Gentlemā a Iustice appoynted for those dayes, who extremely handled the same William Wolsey, and bounde him to the good abearing, 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., good behaviour.

causing him to put in sureties vpon his good behauior vntill the next general Sessions holden within the Ile of Eley: and so the sayd Wolsey being dispatched of his office, and brought in trouble, remoued his house & dwelling place, comming to dwell in the Towne of Wisbiche. Then being called agayne at the nexte Sessions, hee was still constrayned to put in new sureties, which at the lēgth he refused to do, & so was commaunded to the Iayle, MarginaliaW. Wolsey commaunded to the Iayle.at the Syse holden in Eley in lent. 
Commentary  *  Close

Wolsey had drawn attention to himself in Ely by denying the mass and by not attending church for six months before his arrest (Ely Diocesan Register G 1/8, fo. 81r).

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In the Easter weeke folowing, there repayred to conferre with him, D. Fuller the Chauncellor, with Christopherson, and one D. Young: MarginaliaD. Fuller, Christopherson, D. Yong, come to conferre with Wolsey.who layde earnestlye to hys charge that he was out of the catholicke fayth, willing him to meddle no further with the scriptures, thē it did become such a lay man as he was, to do. The said William Wolsey stāding still a great while, suffering them to say their pleasures, at the last answered in this wise: MarginaliaWolsey putteth a question to the Doctours.Good M. Doctor, what did our Sauiour Christ meane, when he spake these wordes written in the 23. Chapter of S. Mathewes Gospell: Wo be vnto you Scribes and Phariseis, ye hipocrites for ye shut vp the kingdome of heauen before men: ye your selues goe not in, neither suffer ye them that come to enter in.

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Yea sayeth Doctour Fuller, you must vnderstand, that Christ spake to the Scribes and Phariseys.

Nay Mayster Doctour (sayth Wolsey) Christ spake euē to you, and your felowes here present, & to al other such like as you be.

Away Mayster Doctor (saith Christopherson) for you can do no good with this man, Yet sayth D. Fuller, I will leaue thee a booke to read.  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, 403, fn 1

Dr. Watson's Book of Sermons or Homilies.

I promise thee, of a learned mās doing, that is to say of Doctor Watsons doing (who was then Bishop of Lincolne.) 
Commentary  *  Close

The book was Thomas Watson, Twoo [sic] notable sermons made'before the quenes highness, concernynge the reall presence (London, 1554), STC 25115. This was considered by contemporaries to have been a very effective defence of transubstantiation.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 403, line 18

"Then" is wrong, unless it mean "afterwards," i. e. A. D. 1557-1559. (Godwin de Præsulibus.)

Wolsey receiuing the same booke, MarginaliaD. Watsons booke of Sermons or Homelyes.did diligently reade it ouer, which in many places did manifestly appeare contrary to the knowne trueth of Gods word. At the length a fourtnight or three weekes folowing, the sayde Doctour Fuller resorting agayne to the prison house to confer with the sayd Wolsey, MarginaliaD. Fuller agayne resorteth to W. Wolsey.did aske him how he liked the sayd booke (thinking that he had won him by þe reading of the same:) who aunswered him and sayd: Syr, I like the booke no otherwise then I thought before I should find it. Wherupon the Chauncellor taking his booke departed home.

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At night when D. Fuller came to his chamber to looke on it, he did finde in many places cōtrary to his minde, the booke raced with a pen by the sayd Wolsey. The which hee seing, and being vexed therwith, sayd: Oh this is an obstinate hereticke and hath quite marred my booke. 

Commentary  *  Close

Wolsey mentioned writing in Watson's book during his trial (Ely Diocesan Register G 1/8, fo. 81v).

Then the Syse holden at Wisbich drawing nye, Doctor Fuller commeth agayne to the sayd Wolsey, and speaketh vnto him on this maner: MarginaliaThe Chancellour geueth leaue to Wolsey to depart.Thou doest much trouble my cōscience, wherfore I pray thee depart, & rule thy toūg, so that I heare no more complaint of thee, and come to the Church when thou wilt, and if thou be complayned vpon, so farre as I may, I promise thee I will not heare of it.

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Mayster Doctour (quoth Wolsey) I was brought hyther by a law, and by a law I will be deliuered.

Then being broughte to the Sessions before named, Wolsey was layd in the Castle at Wisbich, MarginaliaW. Wolsey layd in the Castle of Wisbich.thinking to him and al his frēdes, that he should haue suffered there at that present time, but it proued nothing so.

Then Robert Pygot the painter being at liberty, was there presented by some euill disposed persons (sworne mē as they called them) for not comming to the Church. 

Commentary  *  Close

Pygot confessed to not having attended church for three months before his arrest (Ely Diocesan Register G 1/8, fo. 83r).

MarginaliaRob. Pigot Painter presented for not cōming to the Church.

The sayd Pygot being called in the Sessions, woulde not absent himselfe, but there did playnely appeare before Syr Clement Hygham being Iudge, who sayd vnto him: MarginaliaTalke betweene Syr Clement Higham Iudge, and Rob. Pigot.Ah, are you the holy father the Paynter? How chaunce ye came not to the Churche? Syr (quoth the Paynter) I am not out of the Church, I trust in God.

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No Syr, sayd the Iudge, this is no Churche, this is a Haule. Ye sir sayd Pygot, I know very wel it is a Haule: but he that is in the true faith of Iesus Christ, is neuer absent, but present in the Church of God.

Ah Syrha, sayd the Iudge, you are to high learned for me to talke withall: wherfore I will send you to them that be better learned then I, strayght wayes commaundynge him to the Iayle where Wolsey lay. MarginaliaRob. Pigot brought to the Iayle where W. Wolsey lay.So the Sessiōs being

broken
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