Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Elizabeth Frodsham

Edmund Bonner's mother. Of Fulham. [DNB vide Edmund Bonner]

Nicholas Ridley was kind to Elizabeth Frodsham. She would dine at Ridley's manor in Fulham (her house adjoined it) with Ridley and Mistress Mungey, Bonner's sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley's sister and her husband, George Shipside, were also kind to Bonner's mother and sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1717-18.

[Foxe refers to her only as Bonner's mother.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
George Shipside

George Shipside was the brother-in-law of Nicholas Ridley. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1717-18.

Dr Heath, bishop of Worcester, came to Shipside's aid when Bonner wished him dead. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1718.

Shipside could testify to Ridley's kindness to Edmund Bonner's mother and sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1718.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. Ridley mentioned that he knew that his brother-in-law, Shipside, had spent much time in prison but was now released. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Ridley had married his widowed sister to his servant George Shipside and provided for them and for her three children. The lease had been lost through the action of Bonner, and Ridley pleaded with Queen Mary to provide relief for his sister. 1570, pp. 1935-36, 1576, p. 1660, 1583, p. 1768.

Ridley gave his gown and tippet to Shipside. 1563, p. 1377, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley's 'friendly farewell' sent greetings to him. 1570, pp. 1939-43, 1576, pp. 1622-28, 1583, pp. 1770-76.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hugh Latimer

(1485 - 1555)

Bishop of Worcester (1535 - 1539). Martyr. Of Thirkeson, Leicester. [DNB]

Foxe relates Latimer's formative years. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, pp. 1903-04, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

Hugh Latimer, the martyr, was the son of Hugh Latimer of Thirkeson, Leicestershire. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

Latimer declaimed the work of Melancthon. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1734.

Foxe records a sermon Latimer preached at Cambridge in 1529. 1563, pp. 1298-1304, 1583, pp. 1731-35.

Foxe records another of Latimer's sermons, the subject of which was Turks. 1563, pp. 1304-07, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe records Latimer's sermon on how to play with certain cards. 1563, pp. 1298-1304, 1583, pp. 1731-34.

Buckenham, prior of the Black friars or Lady friars, attempted to show Latimer why scripture should not be in English by use of his cards. 1570, pp. 1903-04, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1734.

Dr Venetus, a Grey friar, berated Latimer in his sermons. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1734.

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College), Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College), Dr Norton (Master of Clare), Dr Philo (Master of Michael House), Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John), Dr Blith (of the King's Hall), Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College), Dr Palmes (Master of St. Nicholas hostel), Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's, Brikenden of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

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Henry VIII appointed Richard Stokesley (Bishop of London), Stephen Gardiner (Bishop of Winchester), Richard Sampson (Bishop of Chichester), William Repps (Bishop of Norwich), Thomas Goodrich (Bishop of Ely), Hugh Latimer (Bishop of Worcester), Nicholas Shaxton (Bishop of Salisbury) and William Barlow (Bishop of St David's) to compose a book of ecclesiastical institutions called the Bishops' Book. 1563, p. 1472.

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Dr West preached against Latimer at Barwell Abbey. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Barnes, prior of the Augustine friars, licensed Latimer to preach to the friars. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Articles were gathered out of Barnes' sermon against Master Tyrell, fellow of King's Hall, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer would walk and talk on 'Heretykes hyll' with Bilney. 1563, pp. 1307-08, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer went with Bilney to visit prisoners in the Tower in Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney spoke to a woman in prison who was accused of killing her own child. Latimer spoke to Henry VIII after a sermon he gave at Windsor and tried to get the woman pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

The woman gave birth to another child and Latimer became godfather, Mistress Cheek godmother. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney gave the woman spiritual counselling and eventually she was pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Dr Redman was an enemy of Latimer at Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe includes a copy in English and in Latin of a letter Latimer received from Dr Redman, who revoked him for the doctrine he taught, along with Latimer's brief response. 1563, p. 1308, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632 [English only], 1583, p. 1736.

Latimer subscribed to articles after three years' teaching and preaching at Cambridge. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1737.

Dr Buttes, the king's physician, housed Latimer while he was preaching in London. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer had been offered the benefice of West Kinton, Wiltshire, through the suit of Dr Buttes and Lord Cromwell. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer had been made bishop of Worcester, assisted by Cromwell and Buttes. 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer refuted Dr Powell's articles. 1563, pp. 1309-11, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Enemies of Latimer were Powell of Salisbury, Wilson of Cambridge, Hubberdin and Sherwood. 1563, p. 1311, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer was called to appear before William Wareham (archbishop of Canterbury) and John Stokesley (bishop of London) on 29 January 1531. 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

The wording in Tonstall's register seems to suggest that Latimer did subscribe. 1563, p. 1334, 1570, p.1907 , 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer was advanced to the post of bishop by Buttes and Cromwell. 1563, p. 1349, 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1633., 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer told Morrice that the mayor had appointed him to preach at Easter. 1563, p. 1314, 1570, p. 1910, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer prayed for Dr Wilson and his countrymen who disliked Latimer. 1563, p. 1317, 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

A friend of Latimer's told him that Wilson had gone to Beverley in Holdernesse and then on progress. 1563, p. 1317, 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer resigned his bishopric at the same time as Bishop Shaxton of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1634, 1583, p. 1740.

Articles were brought against Latimer. 1570, pp. 1926-28, 1576, pp. 1652-53, 1583, p. 1732.

Latimer was injured by a falling tree. He went to London for a remedy but was imprisoned in the Tower by the bishops in Edward's reign. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1738.

A justice in the diocese of Worcester bought land for his brother or for himself and and tried to have a poor man in the diocese damned. This man appealed to Latimer, who wrote to the gentleman about this. The gentleman later mended his ways and died prior to 1563. 1563, p .1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, pp. 1634-35, 1583, p. 1739.

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Latimer preached in Stamford before the duchess of Suffolk in London in convocation and in the garden before King Edward at court. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1739.

He prophecied that plagues would come in Queen Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1354, 1570, p. 1909, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1740.

He believed that preaching the gospel would cost him his life and that was why Winchester was imprisoned. 1563, p. 1354, 1570, p. 1909, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1740.

Articles were imputed to Latimer by Powell of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1654, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Hubberdin railed against Latimer and also railed against Luther, Melancthon, Zwingli, Frith, and Tyndale. Hubberdin danced in the pulpit. 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1639, 1583, p. 1748.

On 4 September 1553, the privy council ordered Latimer to appear before them (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]; APC IV, p. 340).

On 13 September, Latimer appeared before the privy council and was committed to the Tower as a 'close prisoner' (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1704] - 1410]; APC IV, p. 345-46). [NB: Foxe did not reprint the description in the privy council register of Latimer's 'sedycious demeanour'].

Latimer was committed to the Tower on 17 September 1553 (1570, p. 1466; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1635). [Note that Foxe never corrected these inconsistent dates].

He was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, pp. 933 and 938; 1570, pp. 1593; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; 1583, p. 1430).

[There is a summary of Latimer's disputation on Wednesday 18 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, p. 934-35.]

Latimer disputed with Weston, Smith and the other catholic doctors on 18 April 1554 (1563, pp. 978-85; 1570, pp. 1622-27; 1576, pp. 1384-89; 1583, pp. 1454-59).

Latimer was summoned, together with Cranmer and Ridley, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant what he had said during the disputations. He was condemned and taken in custody by the bailiffs (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, pp. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-67).

He was brought out of the bailiff's house where he was being held, on 21 April 1554, to observe a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried a canopy over Weston. Latimer, however, thought he was about to be taken to execution and urged one Augustine Cooper to make a fire that would burn quickly. When he came to Carfax and understood that he was being taken to view the procession, Latimer refused to look at it and ran 'to one Spensers shop' (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, p. 1464).

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Foxe mentions Latimer's condemnation and disputation in passing in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

Bullinger sent commendations to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554 (1570, p. 1692; 1576, p. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley from the Marshalsea(1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500).

The examination of Latimer and Ridley before White and Brookes took place on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from Cardinal Poole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

Latimer appeared at a second session with Brookes and White on 1 October 1555. 1570, pp. 1930-33, 1576, pp. 1758-59.

Ridley was cast into Bocardo prison with Hugh Latimer. 1563, p. 1285, 1583, p. 1718.

There was a conference between Ridley and Latimer in prison upon the objection of Antoman. 1563, pp. 1285-94, 1583, pp. 1718-24.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Bullinger sent commendations to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554. 1570, p. 1692; 1576, p. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley from the Marshalsea. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Foxe relates the behaviour of Ridley and Latimer at their martyrdom. 1563, pp. 1376-79, 1570, pp. 1937-39, 1576, pp. 1661-62, 1583, p. 1769.

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which Ridley makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Letters. 1563, pp. 1314-17, 1321-25, 1333-34, 1344-48, 1349-53, 1570, pp. , 1576, pp. , 1583, pp. 1736-37, 1741-42, 1745-56.

Hugh Latimer presented a new year's gift to Henry VIII. 1563, p. 1734.

Foxe includes one of Latimer's card sermons. 1583, p. 2142.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Mungey

Bonner's sister.

Nicholas Ridley was kind to Mrs Mungey. She would dine at Ridley's manor in Fulham with Ridley and her mother. 1563, p. 1284, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley's sister and her husband, George Shipside, were also kind to Bonner's sister (and mother). 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1717-18.

John Harpsfield sent greetings to her in a letter to Bonner. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846.

 
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Nicholas Heath

(1501? - 1578)

Bishop of Worcester (1543 - 1551, 1553 - 1555). Archbishop of York (1555 - 1560). Lord Chancellor (1556 - 1559). Descended from the Heaths of Apsley, Tamworth. [DNB]

Heath was deprived as bishop of Worcester under Edward VI; he was reinstated by Mary. 1563, p. 1053; 1570, p. 1678; 1576, p. 1432; 1583, p. 1505.

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Robert Ferrar on 4 February 1555. 1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1722-23; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, pp. 1553-54.

On 23 February 1555 the archbishop of York (Nicholas Heath) and the bishop of Chichester (George Day) went to the Counter to speak with Bradford. Heath was gentle towards Bradford when they met. Heath told Bradford that they had not been sent to him but that they had come out of love and charity. Heath knew Bradford better than Day did. 1563, pp. 1204-08, 1570, pp. 1794-97, 1576, pp. 1532-34, 1583, pp. 1615-17.

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A discussion about salvation and other things took place between Bradford and Heath and Day, which lasted three hours. 1563, pp. 1204-08.

Heath and Day left Bradford because the bishop of Durham was waiting at Master York's house. 1563, p. 1208.

Ridley was kind to Heath during Edward VI's reign. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester [Heath] and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

Philpot's twelfth examination on 4 December 1555 was before Bonner, Worcester and Bangor. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

During Philpot's twelfth examination, Worcester told Philpot that Durham and Chichester would be coming to speak with him. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, p. 1717, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

Philpot's thirteenth examination was before York [Heath], Chichester and others. 1570, p. 1996, 1576, pp. 1717-19, 1583, pp. 1824-26.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before Bonner and other bishops, including York. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

After Cromwell was apprehended, Bishops Heath and Skip forsook Cranmer and stood against him. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, pp. 1865-66.

Heath questioned Cranmer about his bill against the mass. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, pp. 1764-64, 1583, p. 1871.

Drakes, Tyms, Spurge, Cavell and Ambrose petitioned Heath over their long imprisonment. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

The receipt of a writ about Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole from Heath was delayed. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Robert Farrer was examined before the bishops of Durham and Worcester, Sir Robert Rochester, Sir Richard Southwell and Gilbert Bourne. 1563, p. 1732, 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Nicholas Heath was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

He was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Ridley

(d. 1555) (DNB)

Bishop of London (1550 - 1553). Martyr. [DNB]

Nicholas Ridley gave John Rogers a prebend in St Paul's (1563, p. 1023; 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1484).

He led the bishops who compelled John Hooper to wear vestments at his consecration. Ridley wrote a letter to Hooper apologising for this in Mary's reign (1563, pp. 1050-2; 1570, pp. 1676-7; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5).

He preached a sermon at Paul's Cross, at the behest of the privy council, supporting Jane Grey's claim to the throne. After Mary's accession Ridley visited the queen at Framlingham and was arrested (1563, p. 903; 1570, p. 1569; 1576, p. 1338; and 1583, p. 1408).

He was engaged, over dinner with John Feckenham and Sir John Bourne, in a debate on the nature of the eucharist. An account of the debate, 'penned with his own hand,' is first printed in 1563, (1563, pp. 928-31; 1570, pp. 1589-91; 1576, pp. 1356-58; and 1583, pp. 1426-28). There is no earlier printed version or manuscript of the exchange.

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Ridley was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, p. 933 and 937-38; 1570, p. 1593; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; 1583, pp. 1429-30).

[NB: There is a summary of Ridley's disputation on Tuesday 17 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, pp 933-34].

Ridley disputed with Richard Smith and the other catholic doctors on 17 April 1554 (1563, p. 957-78; 1570, pp. 1606-22; 1576, pp. 1370-84; 1583, pp. 1441-54).

Ridley's preface to his account of the disputation is 1563, pp. 956-57 and (in a differently worded version) 1570, p. 1632; 1576, pp. 1392-93; 1583, p. 1463.

Ridley's conclusion to his account of the Oxford disputations is printed (only) in 1563, p. 978.

Ridley wrote to Weston protesting the conduct of the 1554 Oxford disputations and demanding that Ridley's written responses to the three propositions be shown to the higher house of convocation (1563, p. 977; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, pp. 1393-94; 1583, p. 1464).

The queen's letter ordering Ridley, together with Cranmer and Latimer, to be held in the custody of the mayor and bailiffs of Oxford during the disputation is printed in 1563, p. 999.

He was summoned, together with Cranmer and Latimer, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant what he had said during the disputations. He was condemned and taken to the sheriff's house (1563, pp. 935-38; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-64).

On 21 April 1554, Ridley was compelled to observe, having been brought from the sheriff's house, a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried a canopy over Weston (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, p. 1464).

Ridley wrote a letter to Cranmer, which was sent together with copies of his account of the disputation and news of recent developments (1570, pp. 1633-34; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, pp. 1464).

Foxe mentions Ridley's condemnation and disputation in passing in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469.

In a letter of 10 October 1554, Heinrich Bullinger asked John Hooper to pass his commendations toRidley, Hugh Latimer and Thomas Cranmer (1570, p. 1692; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Ridley was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for a chance to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Ridley, Thomas Cranmer and Hugh Latimer from the Marshalsea(1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97).

Foxe describes Ridley's character. 1563, p. 1283, 1570, p. 1895, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

John Bradford was persuaded to enter the ministry by Ridley. Ridley called Bradford to take the position of deacon and, at Bradford's willing, ordered him deacon. 1563, p. 1173, 1570, p. 1780, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1603-04.

He led the bishops who compelled John Hooper to wear vestments at his consecration. Ridley wrote a letter to Hooper apologising for this in Mary's reign. 1563, pp. 1050-2; 1570, pp. 1676-7; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5.

In a letter of 10 October 1554, Heinrich Bullinger asked John Hooper to pass his commendations to Ridley, Hugh Latimer and Thomas Cranmer. 1570, p. 1692; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Ridley was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for a chance to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms. 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Ridley, Thomas Cranmer and Hugh Latimer from the Marshalsea.1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97.

During Bradford's second examination, Doctor Seton described Ridley and Latimer as being unable to answer anything at all at their examinations. 1570, p. 1786, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1607.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Foxe recounts the life of Ridley. 1563, pp. 1283-96, 1570, pp. 1895-96, 1576, pp. 1623-24, 1583, pp. 1717-30.

Ridley was kind to Heath, archbishop of York during Edward VI's reign. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley was kind to Edmund Bonner's mother. She would dine at Ridley's manor in Fulham with Ridley and Mistress Mungey, Bonner's sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley's sister and her husband, George Shipside, were also kind to Bonner's mother and sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1717-18.

Ridley was converted through the reading of Bertram's Book of the Sacrament, and confirmed in his beliefs through conference with Cranmer and Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1895, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

After Mary's accession, Ridley was kept first in the Tower, then in the Bocardo in Oxford, and then held in custody at Master Irish's house until his death. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1624, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley was cast into Bocardo prison with Hugh Latimer. 1563, p. 1285, 1583, p. 1718.

A conference took place between Ridley and Latimer in prison on the objections of Antonian, in other words, those of a popish persecutor, such as Winchester. 1563, pp. 1285-94, 1583, pp. 1718-24.

Letters of Ridley. 1570, pp. 1896-1902, 1576, pp. 1624-30, 1583, pp. 1724-30.

A letter was sent by Ridley to West, in which Ridley asked West and also Dr Harvey to remember their promises to him. Foxe also includes West's letter and Ridley's response. 1570, pp. 1900-01, 1576, pp. 1627-28, 1583, pp. 1728-29.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. He mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins, a weaver, had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote this letter. He had heard that West had relented, and Grimald been cast into the Marshalsea. He had also heard that Thomas Ridley, of the Bull-head in Cheapside, had died. He had heard that his brother-in-law, Shipside, had spent much time in prison but was now released. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

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The examination of Ridley and Latimer by White (Lincoln) and Brookes (Gloucester) took place on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from Cardinal Poole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

A communication took place between Ridley and Brookes in Irish's house on 15 October, on which day he was degraded, and at which Edridge ('reader then of the Greek lecture') was present.. 1563, pp. 1374-76, 1570, pp. 1934-35, 1576, pp. 1659-60, 1583, pp. 1768-69.

Ridley had a discussion with Brookes on 16 October, on which day he was degraded. 1563, pp. 1374-76.

Foxe recounts the behaviour of Ridley at supper the night before he was martyred. 1563, pp. 1376-79, 1570, pp. 1936-37, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Foxe recounts the behaviour of Ridley and Latimer at their martyrdom. 1563, pp. 1376-1379, 1570, pp. 1937-39, 1576, pp. 1661-62, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley gave his gown and tippet to Shipside. 1563, p. 1377, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley gave a new groat to Henry Lea. 1563, p. 1377, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley spoke with Lord Williams before his martyrdom. 1563, p. 1379, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1662, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley's friendly farewell. 1563, pp. 1379-81, 1570, pp. 1939-43, 1576, pp. 1622-28, 1583, pp. 1770-76.

Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which he makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Cranmer was confirmed in his reformist beliefs after conference with Ridley. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

In the third year of Edward's reign, Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley admitted Robert Drakes to minister the sacraments. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Letter to Augustine Bernher [BL, Harley 416, fo.16v. Printed in LM, p. 72 et seq. Also in 1570, p. 1902 et seq.].

Letter to Augustine Bernher [BL Harley 416, fos.17v and 32r. Not printed in Foxe or LM].

Letter to Bernher [BL Harley 416, fo.32r. Not printed in AM or LM.]

Letter to Bradford. [BL Harley 416, fo.32v. Printed in LM, pp. 62 et seq. and 1570, p. 1897 et seq.]

Foxe records Nicholas Ridley's writings against idolatry. 1583, pp. 2128-31.

Lord Dacre would have paid a ransom to Mary for his kinsman Nicholas Ridley's life if it were possible but she refused. 1563, p. 1733, 1583, p. 2131.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
West

(d. 1554?)

West is described by Foxe as a chaplain to Nicholas Ridley. He said mass against his conscience and died soon afterwards. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

A letter was sent by Ridley to West, in which Ridley asked West and also Dr Harvey to remember their promises to him. Foxe also includes West's letter and Ridley's response. 1563, p. 1379,1570, pp. 1900-01, 1576, pp. 1627-28, 1583, pp. 1728-29.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. Ridley mentioned that he knew that West had relented. 1570, p. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

[Almost certainly Edmund West, who was steward to Ridley and a prebend of St Paul's (1551 - 1554), Rector of Fulham, Middlesex, (1552 - 1554). Died 1554. (Venn)]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Wolsey

(d. 1555)

Martyr. Constable, dwelling in Wells, but removed to Wisbeach.

William Wolsey was condemned by John Fuller, the bishop's chancellor of Ely, Dr Shaxton, the suffragen, Robert Steward, dean of Ely, and John Christopherson, dean of Norwich on 9 October 1555. 1563, p. 1283 [states around 4 October], 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

He was brought to death by his procurement of Richard Everard, gentleman and justice, who originally requested surities of Wolsey, and brought him to live in Wisbeach. Wolsey refused to give surities and so was imprisoned during assizes at Ely that Lent. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

During Easter week William Wolsey conferred with Fuller, Christopherson and Dr Young. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Young told Wolsey that laymen should not meddle with scripture, to which Wolsey counter-argued using scripture. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Fuller gave Wolsey a book [Dr Watson's Book of Sermons or Homilies] to read. That night when Fuller returned to Wolsey, he saw that Wolsey had crossed out the content of the book. Fuller called him a heretic. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Fuller gave Wolsey the chance to avoid being examined, which Wolsey refused. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Fuller sent Wolsey to Ely prison until his execution. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Wolsey was visited in prison by a chaplain of Bishop Goodricke's, Peter Valentius, who was of French birth, and who was almoner there for twenty years prior to this meeting. Valentius questioned his beliefs. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

Wolsey was called before Fuller (then chancellor), Shaxton, Christopherson, and others of the commission on 9 October 1555. They examined both Wolsey and Pygot about their doctrinal beliefs. 1570, pp. 1893-94, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

William Wolsey was burned with Robert Pygot. 1563, p. 1283, 1570, pp. 1893-4, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

Peacock preached at the execution of Wolsey and Pygot. 1570, pp. 1893-94, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

When Wolsey and Pygot were bound to the stake, Wolsey was spoken to by Richard Collinson, a destitute priest without living or residence, as he was concerned for his doctrinal errors. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

Books were burned with Wolsey and Pygot (probably New Testaments), one of which each man held to his breast in the flames. 1563, p. 1284, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

Witnesses and informers of the death of Wolsey (and Pygot) were: Robert Scortred, Robert Crane, Edward Story, Robert Kendall, and Richard Best. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

A further account of the imprisonment and death of Wolsey and Pygot was given by Thomas Hodilo and William Fulke. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, pp. 1621-2,1583, p. 1715.

Hodilo visited Wolsey in prison in Ely and was given some money by Wolsey for Hodilo to distribute to Wolsey's wife, kinsfolk and friends. Wolsey also gave him six shillings and eight pence to give to Richard Denton. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, pp. 1621-2,1583, p. 1715.

1741 [1717]

Queene Mary. The life and story of Nicholas Ridley Bishop of London Martyr.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. October.For in the yeare of our Lord. 1564. On Tuesday beyng the 18. of Aprill, his house was set on fire, & while he went in, to saue his goodes he loste his life, with two other that were in the same house. 

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Foxe would later include Denton's death by fire among a collection of cases of providential retribution printed at the end of the Acts and Monuments. (See 1570, p. 2303; 1576, p. 1994 and 1583, p. 2103).

MarginaliaRichard Dentō burned iu his owne house, which before would not burne for Christ. Anno 1564. Aprill. 18.

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Witnessed by Thomas Hodilo,
and William Fulke.

Not much vnlike to this, was also the example of M. West Chapleine to Bishop Ridley, who refusing to die in Christes cause with his Mayster, sayd Masse agaynst hys couscience, and soone after dyed.

¶ Doctor Nicholas Ridley and M. Hugh Latimer, both Byshops, Preachers, and Martyrs of Christ, with theyr doinges, conferences, and sufferinges described. 
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Life and Character of Ridley

Perhaps rather surprisingly there is no account of Nicholas Ridley's life in theRerum. This can be explained by the pressure Foxe was under to complete the Rerum in time for the Frankfurt book fair in September 1559. Those martyrs executed after the summer of 1555 received, with one or two exceptions, little notice in the Rerum because Foxe was running close to his September deadline. Foxe made up for this neglect in the first edition of the Acts and Monuments. Most of the account of Ridley's life and behaviour first appeared in the 1563 edition and was clearly based on the testimony of those who knew the bishop. (It is worth remembering that Ridley ordained Foxeas a deacon in 1550 and that Edmund Grindal was one of those closest to the martyredbishop). Additions were made to this account in the 1570 edition which were clearly derived from the testimony of Ridley's brother-in-law George Shipside. No changes were made to this material in the 1576 and 1583 editions.

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MarginaliaDoct. Nicholas Ridley, Martyr.THe same yeare, moneth, and day in whiche the foresayd 2. Martyrs William Wolsey, & Tho. Pygot suffered at Eley, the which was an 1555 October 16. folowed also at Oxford the slaughter of two other speciall & singuler Captaines, & principall pillers of Christes Churche. Mayster Ridley Bishop of London, & Mayster Hugh Latimer, Byshop sometimes of Worcester: of whose famous doinges & memorable learning, & incomparable ornaments & giftes of grace, ioyned with no lesse cōmendable sincerity of lyfe, as all the Realme canne witnes sufficiently: so it needeth not greatly that we should stand exactly at this time in setting forth a full description of the same, but onely to cōprehend briefly in a few words touching the order of theyr liues, so much as necessarily serueth to the due instruction of þe reader, & maketh to the vse of this present history, in declaring first theyr beginning & bringing vp, thē theyr studyes and actes in the Vniuersitye, theyr prefermentes also by theyr studyes to higher dignity, at last theyr trouble & trauell in setting forth Religion, and in mainteining the same to the shedding of theyr bloud. And first to begin with the life of Mayster Ridley, whose story here ensueth.

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AMong many other worthy and sundry historyes & notable acts of such as of late daies haue bene turmoiled, murthered  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 407, line 2

The first edition of the "Acts" (p. 283) reads "manicled, murdered."

and martyred for the true Gospell of Christe in Queene Maries raigne, the tragicall story and life of Doctour Ridley, I thought good to commend to Chronycle and leaue to perpetuall memorye: beseeching thee gentle Reader, with care and studye well to peruse, diligently to consider, and deepely to print the same in thy brest, seeing him to be a man beautified with such excellent qualities, so ghostly 
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Spiritually.

inspired and godly learned, & now written doubtlesse in the booke of life, with the blessed Sayntes of the almighty, crowned and throned amongest the glorious cōpany of Martyrs. First descending of a stocke right worshipfull,  
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The changes in this phrase from the 1563 to the 1570 edition are interesting. In the first edition Ridley was described as being from 'gentlestock' and he was promoted to being from 'stock right worshipful'. William Turner, a leading protestant divine and writer, wrote a letter to Foxe, dated 26 November 1564, in which, among other things, he described Ridley's background and early life.In the letter, Turner declared that Ridley was 'e nobili Ridleiorum prosapia prognatus' [descended from the noble family of Ridley] and pointed out that one of Ridley's uncles was a knight and another a famous divine (BL, Harley 416, fo. 132r). Foxe did not use any other information about Ridley which Turner supplied but this passage in Foxe's text may have been changed because of Turner's emphasis on the high status of the Ridley family. (Turner's letter is printed, with an English translation, inThe Works of Nicholas Ridley, ed., Henry Christmas [Parker Society, 1841], pp. 487-95).

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he was borne in Northūberlandshire, MarginaliaNicholas Ridley borne in Northumberland.who being a childe, learned his Grammer with greate dexteritye in Newcastle, MarginaliaNicholas Ridley learned at Newcastle.and was remoued from thence to the Vniuersity of Cambridge, where he in shorte space became so famous, that for his singular aptnes, he was called to hyer functions and Offices of the Vniuersity, by degree atteyning thereunto, and was called to be head of Pembrooke hall, MarginaliaNicholas Ridley mayster of Pembroke hall in Cambridge.and there made Doctour of Diuinitye. MarginaliaNicholas Ridley made D. of Diuinitye.After thys departing from thence, he trauelled to Paris, who at his returne, was made Chapleine to king Henrye the eight, MarginaliaNicholas Ridley king Henryes Chapleine.and promoted afterwardes by him to the bishoprick of Rochester: 
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Henry VIII did not create Ridley bishop of Rochester. Henry died on 28 January 1547, while Ridley was appointed bishop of Rochester at the end of August 1547 and consecrated in September of that year.

MarginaliaNicholas Ridley made Bishop of Rochester.and so from thence translated to the See and Bishopricke of London in king Edwardes dayes. MarginaliaNicholas Ridley made Bishop of Londō.

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In which calling and offices he so trauelled and occupyed hym selfe by preachinge and teachinge the true and wholesome doctrine of Christ, that neuer good childe was more singularly loued of his deare parents, then he of his flocke and Dioces. MarginaliaThe fruitefull dilligence of B. Ridley in preaching Gods word.Euery holy day and Sonday he lightly 

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Pleasantly.

preached in some one place or other, except he wer other wise letted  
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In the first edition, the word here is 'detented' which means held back or obstructed [OED]. In subsequent editions this word was replaced with the word'letted' which means hindered.

by weighty affayres and busines: to whose sermons the people resorted, swarming about him like bees, and coueting the sweete flowers and wholesome ioyce of the fruitfull doctrine, whiche he did not onely preach, but shewed the same by his life, as a glittering lanterne to the eyes and sences of the blinde, in such pure order and chastity of life (declining from euil desires and concupiscences  
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Carnal desires.

) that euen his very enemies could not reproue him in anye one iote thereof.

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MarginaliaB. Ridley of great memory and reading.Besides this, he was passingly well learned, his memorye was greate, and he of suche reading withall, that of right he deserued to be comparable to the best of this our age, as can testify as well diuers his notable workes, pythy sermons, and sundry his disputatiōs in both the Vniuersites, as also his very aduersaryes, all whiche will saye

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no lesse themselues.

Besides all this, wise he was of counsell, deepe of wit, and very politicke in all his doings. How mercifull & carefull he was to reduce the obstinate papistes frō their erroneous opinions, & by gentlenes to win them to the truth, his gentle ordering and curteous handling of Doc. Heath late Archbishop of Yorke 

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Nicholas Heath had been deprived of the bishopric of Worcester in 1551 and placed in Ridley's custody. In Mary's reign he was restored to his bishopric and then promoted to the archbishopric of York. Foxe refers to him as the late archbishop because he was deprived of the office in 1559.

being prisoner with him in king Edwardes time in his house one yeare, sufficiently declareth. In fine, he was suche a Prelate, and in all poyntes so good, godly, & ghostly a man, that England may iustly rue the losse of so worthy a treasure. And thus hitherto concerning these publicke matters.

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Now will I speake something further particularly of his person & conditiōs. MarginaliaB. Ridley comely of proportion and complexion.He was a man right comly & well proportioned in all poynts, both in cōplexion & lineamēts of the body. He tooke all thinges in good part, bearing no malice nor rancour in his hart, but straight wayes forgetting all iniuries & offēces done agaynst him. MarginaliaThe fayre conditions of Byshop Ridley. Marginaliatender to his kinred, yet not otherwise then truth and right required.He was very kind & naturall to his kinsfolke, and yet not bearyng with them any thing otherwise thē right would require, geueing them alwayes for a generall rule, yea to his own brother & sister, 

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I.e., Ridley's brother-in-law George Shipside and his sister (and Shipside's wife) Alice.

that they doing euill, should seeke or look for nothing at his hand, but shoulde be as straungers and aliens vnto him, and they to be his brother or sister, which vsed honesty, and a godly trade of life.

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MarginaliaB. Ridley a great mortyfier of himselfe. The order of his study and dyet.He vsing all kindes of wayes to mortify himselfe, was geuen to much praier and contemplation: For duely euery morning, so soone as his apparell was done vpon him, he went forthwith to his bedde chamber, and there vpon hys knees prayed the space of halfe an houre: which being don, immediately he went to his studye (if there came no other busines to interrupt him) where he continued till ten of þe clocke, and then came to common prayer, dayly vsed in his house. The prayers being done, he went to dynner, where he vsed litle talke except otherwise occasion by some hadde bene ministred, and then was it sober, discreet, and wise, & sometime mery, as cause required.

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The dinner done, which was not very long he vsed to sit an houre or therabouts talking or playing at the chests: 

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I.e., chess.

That done he returned to his study, & there would continue, except suiters or busines abroad were occasiō of the cōtrary, vntill 5. of the clocke at night, & then would come to cōmon prayer, as in the forenoone: which being finished he went to supper, behauing himselfe there, as at his dinner before: MarginaliaHis order after supper:After supper, recreating himselfe in playing at chestes the space of an houre, he would then returne againe to his studye: continuing there till 11. of the clocke at night, which was his cōmon houre to go to bed, then saying hys prayers vpō his knees as in þe morning when he rose. MarginaliaThe carefull dilligence of Bishop Ridley in instructing his familye.Being at his manor of Fulhā, as diuers times he vsed to be, he read daily a lecture to his family at the commō prayer, beginning at the acts of the apostles, & so going throughout all the Epistles of S. Paule, geuing to euery man that could read a new Testament, hyring thē besides with mony to learne by hart certayne principall Chapters, but especially the xiij. chapter of the Actes, reading also vnto his housholde oftentimes the 101. Psalme, being maruellous carefull ouer his family, that they might be a spectacle of all vertue & honesty to other. To be short, as he was godly & vertuous himselfe, so nothing but vertue & godlines reigned in his house, feeding them with the food of our sauiour Iesus Christ.

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Now remayneth a worde or two to be declared of hys gentle nature and kindly pitty in the vsage of an olde woman called Maystres Boner, mother to Doctour Boner, sometime Bishop of London: whiche I thought good to touch, as well for the rare clemency of Doctour Ridley, as the vnworthy immanity and ingratefull disposition again of Doctor Boner. MarginaliaThe behauiour of Bishop Ridley to Doctor Boners mother.Bishop Ridley being at his Manor of Fulham, alwayes sent for the sayd maistres Boner, dwelling in an house adioyning to his house, to dyner and supper, with one Maistresse Mungey Boners sister, saying: go for my mother Boner, who cōming, was euer placed in the chayre at þe tables end, being so gently entreated, welcomed, & taken, as though he had bene borne of her owne body, being neuer displaced of her seat, although the kings Counsell had bene present, saying, when any of them were there (as diuers times they were) by your Lordships fauor, this place of right and custome is for my mother Boner. But howe well he was recompenced for this his singular gentlenes, and pitifull pity after at the handes of the sayd Doctor Boner, almost the least child that goeth by the ground can declare. MarginaliaThe courtesie of Ridley and the currishnes of Boner described & compared together.For who afterward, was more enemy to Ridley, then Boner and his? Who more went aboute to seek his destruction, then he? recompensing his gentlenes with extreme cruelty. 

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Note that in the 1563 edition, Foxe accused Bonner of imprisoning Alice Shipside, Nicholas Ridley's sister. Foxe was much less specific about this in the 1570 edition but much more detailed about the ordeals of George Shipside. As the source for the 1570 account was Shipside himself, this version of events is more accurate. Although Foxe does not say so, Shipside was not persecuted out of unmotivated malice, he was arrested when he was caught delivering works which Ridley had written while incarcerated to one of the bishop's former chaplains (see ECL 260, fo. 115r - printed in Letters of the Martyrs, p. 54 - also see Letters of the Martyrs, pp. 56-57).

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As well appeared by the strait handling of Ridleyes owne naturall sister, and George Shypside her husband, from time to time: whereas the gentle-

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