Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Augustine Bernher

(d. 1567)

Clerk and servant of Latimer. Of Swiss or Belgian origin. [DNB]

When Hugh Latimer was committed to the Tower on 13 September 1553, 'his servant Austen' was allowed to attend him (1583, p. 1410) ('one Anstey, his servant' in APC IV, p. 346).

Augustine Bernher received a letter from John Bradford. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

He received a letter from Nicholas Ridley. 1570, p. 1902, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

He was a friend of Robert Glover. Information about Robert Glover's death was given to Foxe by Bernher. 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1713.

John Careless wrote a letter to Augustine Bernher. 1570, pp. 2109-10, 1576, pp. 1820-21.1583, pp. 1927-28.

John Careless wrote another letter to A.B. [Augustine Bernher] 1570, pp. 2115-16, 1576, pp. 1838-39, 1583, pp. 1932-33.

Bernher was de facto leader of the clandestine London congregation late in Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

[See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Dissenters from a Dissenting Church: The Challenge of the Freewillers, 1550-1558' in The Beginnings of English Protestantism, ed. P. Marshall and A. Ryrie (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 129-56.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hugh Latimer

(1485 - 1555)

Bishop of Worcester (1535 - 1539). Martyr. Of Thirkeson, Leicester. [DNB]

Foxe relates Latimer's formative years. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, pp. 1903-04, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

Hugh Latimer, the martyr, was the son of Hugh Latimer of Thirkeson, Leicestershire. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

Latimer declaimed the work of Melancthon. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1734.

Foxe records a sermon Latimer preached at Cambridge in 1529. 1563, pp. 1298-1304, 1583, pp. 1731-35.

Foxe records another of Latimer's sermons, the subject of which was Turks. 1563, pp. 1304-07, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe records Latimer's sermon on how to play with certain cards. 1563, pp. 1298-1304, 1583, pp. 1731-34.

Buckenham, prior of the Black friars or Lady friars, attempted to show Latimer why scripture should not be in English by use of his cards. 1570, pp. 1903-04, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1734.

Dr Venetus, a Grey friar, berated Latimer in his sermons. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1734.

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College), Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College), Dr Norton (Master of Clare), Dr Philo (Master of Michael House), Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John), Dr Blith (of the King's Hall), Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College), Dr Palmes (Master of St. Nicholas hostel), Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's, Brikenden of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

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Henry VIII appointed Richard Stokesley (Bishop of London), Stephen Gardiner (Bishop of Winchester), Richard Sampson (Bishop of Chichester), William Repps (Bishop of Norwich), Thomas Goodrich (Bishop of Ely), Hugh Latimer (Bishop of Worcester), Nicholas Shaxton (Bishop of Salisbury) and William Barlow (Bishop of St David's) to compose a book of ecclesiastical institutions called the Bishops' Book. 1563, p. 1472.

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Dr West preached against Latimer at Barwell Abbey. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Barnes, prior of the Augustine friars, licensed Latimer to preach to the friars. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Articles were gathered out of Barnes' sermon against Master Tyrell, fellow of King's Hall, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer would walk and talk on 'Heretykes hyll' with Bilney. 1563, pp. 1307-08, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer went with Bilney to visit prisoners in the Tower in Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney spoke to a woman in prison who was accused of killing her own child. Latimer spoke to Henry VIII after a sermon he gave at Windsor and tried to get the woman pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

The woman gave birth to another child and Latimer became godfather, Mistress Cheek godmother. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney gave the woman spiritual counselling and eventually she was pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Dr Redman was an enemy of Latimer at Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe includes a copy in English and in Latin of a letter Latimer received from Dr Redman, who revoked him for the doctrine he taught, along with Latimer's brief response. 1563, p. 1308, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632 [English only], 1583, p. 1736.

Latimer subscribed to articles after three years' teaching and preaching at Cambridge. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1737.

Dr Buttes, the king's physician, housed Latimer while he was preaching in London. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer had been offered the benefice of West Kinton, Wiltshire, through the suit of Dr Buttes and Lord Cromwell. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer had been made bishop of Worcester, assisted by Cromwell and Buttes. 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer refuted Dr Powell's articles. 1563, pp. 1309-11, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Enemies of Latimer were Powell of Salisbury, Wilson of Cambridge, Hubberdin and Sherwood. 1563, p. 1311, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer was called to appear before William Wareham (archbishop of Canterbury) and John Stokesley (bishop of London) on 29 January 1531. 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

The wording in Tonstall's register seems to suggest that Latimer did subscribe. 1563, p. 1334, 1570, p.1907 , 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer was advanced to the post of bishop by Buttes and Cromwell. 1563, p. 1349, 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1633., 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer told Morrice that the mayor had appointed him to preach at Easter. 1563, p. 1314, 1570, p. 1910, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer prayed for Dr Wilson and his countrymen who disliked Latimer. 1563, p. 1317, 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

A friend of Latimer's told him that Wilson had gone to Beverley in Holdernesse and then on progress. 1563, p. 1317, 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer resigned his bishopric at the same time as Bishop Shaxton of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1634, 1583, p. 1740.

Articles were brought against Latimer. 1570, pp. 1926-28, 1576, pp. 1652-53, 1583, p. 1732.

Latimer was injured by a falling tree. He went to London for a remedy but was imprisoned in the Tower by the bishops in Edward's reign. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1738.

A justice in the diocese of Worcester bought land for his brother or for himself and and tried to have a poor man in the diocese damned. This man appealed to Latimer, who wrote to the gentleman about this. The gentleman later mended his ways and died prior to 1563. 1563, p .1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, pp. 1634-35, 1583, p. 1739.

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Latimer preached in Stamford before the duchess of Suffolk in London in convocation and in the garden before King Edward at court. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1739.

He prophecied that plagues would come in Queen Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1354, 1570, p. 1909, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1740.

He believed that preaching the gospel would cost him his life and that was why Winchester was imprisoned. 1563, p. 1354, 1570, p. 1909, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1740.

Articles were imputed to Latimer by Powell of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1654, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Hubberdin railed against Latimer and also railed against Luther, Melancthon, Zwingli, Frith, and Tyndale. Hubberdin danced in the pulpit. 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1639, 1583, p. 1748.

On 4 September 1553, the privy council ordered Latimer to appear before them (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]; APC IV, p. 340).

On 13 September, Latimer appeared before the privy council and was committed to the Tower as a 'close prisoner' (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1704] - 1410]; APC IV, p. 345-46). [NB: Foxe did not reprint the description in the privy council register of Latimer's 'sedycious demeanour'].

Latimer was committed to the Tower on 17 September 1553 (1570, p. 1466; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1635). [Note that Foxe never corrected these inconsistent dates].

He was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, pp. 933 and 938; 1570, pp. 1593; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; 1583, p. 1430).

[There is a summary of Latimer's disputation on Wednesday 18 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, p. 934-35.]

Latimer disputed with Weston, Smith and the other catholic doctors on 18 April 1554 (1563, pp. 978-85; 1570, pp. 1622-27; 1576, pp. 1384-89; 1583, pp. 1454-59).

Latimer was summoned, together with Cranmer and Ridley, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant what he had said during the disputations. He was condemned and taken in custody by the bailiffs (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, pp. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-67).

He was brought out of the bailiff's house where he was being held, on 21 April 1554, to observe a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried a canopy over Weston. Latimer, however, thought he was about to be taken to execution and urged one Augustine Cooper to make a fire that would burn quickly. When he came to Carfax and understood that he was being taken to view the procession, Latimer refused to look at it and ran 'to one Spensers shop' (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, p. 1464).

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Foxe mentions Latimer's condemnation and disputation in passing in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

Bullinger sent commendations to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554 (1570, p. 1692; 1576, p. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley from the Marshalsea(1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500).

The examination of Latimer and Ridley before White and Brookes took place on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from Cardinal Poole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

Latimer appeared at a second session with Brookes and White on 1 October 1555. 1570, pp. 1930-33, 1576, pp. 1758-59.

Ridley was cast into Bocardo prison with Hugh Latimer. 1563, p. 1285, 1583, p. 1718.

There was a conference between Ridley and Latimer in prison upon the objection of Antoman. 1563, pp. 1285-94, 1583, pp. 1718-24.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Bullinger sent commendations to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554. 1570, p. 1692; 1576, p. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley from the Marshalsea. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Foxe relates the behaviour of Ridley and Latimer at their martyrdom. 1563, pp. 1376-79, 1570, pp. 1937-39, 1576, pp. 1661-62, 1583, p. 1769.

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which Ridley makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Letters. 1563, pp. 1314-17, 1321-25, 1333-34, 1344-48, 1349-53, 1570, pp. , 1576, pp. , 1583, pp. 1736-37, 1741-42, 1745-56.

Hugh Latimer presented a new year's gift to Henry VIII. 1563, p. 1734.

Foxe includes one of Latimer's card sermons. 1583, p. 2142.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hugh Latimer (Snr)

Hugh Latimer's father. [DNB, sub Hugh Latimer]

Hugh Latimer, the martyr, was the son of Hugh Latimer of Thirkeson, Leicestershire. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Ridley

(d. 1555) (DNB)

Bishop of London (1550 - 1553). Martyr. [DNB]

Nicholas Ridley gave John Rogers a prebend in St Paul's (1563, p. 1023; 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1484).

He led the bishops who compelled John Hooper to wear vestments at his consecration. Ridley wrote a letter to Hooper apologising for this in Mary's reign (1563, pp. 1050-2; 1570, pp. 1676-7; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5).

He preached a sermon at Paul's Cross, at the behest of the privy council, supporting Jane Grey's claim to the throne. After Mary's accession Ridley visited the queen at Framlingham and was arrested (1563, p. 903; 1570, p. 1569; 1576, p. 1338; and 1583, p. 1408).

He was engaged, over dinner with John Feckenham and Sir John Bourne, in a debate on the nature of the eucharist. An account of the debate, 'penned with his own hand,' is first printed in 1563, (1563, pp. 928-31; 1570, pp. 1589-91; 1576, pp. 1356-58; and 1583, pp. 1426-28). There is no earlier printed version or manuscript of the exchange.

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Ridley was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, p. 933 and 937-38; 1570, p. 1593; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; 1583, pp. 1429-30).

[NB: There is a summary of Ridley's disputation on Tuesday 17 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, pp 933-34].

Ridley disputed with Richard Smith and the other catholic doctors on 17 April 1554 (1563, p. 957-78; 1570, pp. 1606-22; 1576, pp. 1370-84; 1583, pp. 1441-54).

Ridley's preface to his account of the disputation is 1563, pp. 956-57 and (in a differently worded version) 1570, p. 1632; 1576, pp. 1392-93; 1583, p. 1463.

Ridley's conclusion to his account of the Oxford disputations is printed (only) in 1563, p. 978.

Ridley wrote to Weston protesting the conduct of the 1554 Oxford disputations and demanding that Ridley's written responses to the three propositions be shown to the higher house of convocation (1563, p. 977; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, pp. 1393-94; 1583, p. 1464).

The queen's letter ordering Ridley, together with Cranmer and Latimer, to be held in the custody of the mayor and bailiffs of Oxford during the disputation is printed in 1563, p. 999.

He was summoned, together with Cranmer and Latimer, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant what he had said during the disputations. He was condemned and taken to the sheriff's house (1563, pp. 935-38; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-64).

On 21 April 1554, Ridley was compelled to observe, having been brought from the sheriff's house, a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried a canopy over Weston (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, p. 1464).

Ridley wrote a letter to Cranmer, which was sent together with copies of his account of the disputation and news of recent developments (1570, pp. 1633-34; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, pp. 1464).

Foxe mentions Ridley's condemnation and disputation in passing in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469.

In a letter of 10 October 1554, Heinrich Bullinger asked John Hooper to pass his commendations toRidley, Hugh Latimer and Thomas Cranmer (1570, p. 1692; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Ridley was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for a chance to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Ridley, Thomas Cranmer and Hugh Latimer from the Marshalsea(1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97).

Foxe describes Ridley's character. 1563, p. 1283, 1570, p. 1895, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

John Bradford was persuaded to enter the ministry by Ridley. Ridley called Bradford to take the position of deacon and, at Bradford's willing, ordered him deacon. 1563, p. 1173, 1570, p. 1780, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1603-04.

He led the bishops who compelled John Hooper to wear vestments at his consecration. Ridley wrote a letter to Hooper apologising for this in Mary's reign. 1563, pp. 1050-2; 1570, pp. 1676-7; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5.

In a letter of 10 October 1554, Heinrich Bullinger asked John Hooper to pass his commendations to Ridley, Hugh Latimer and Thomas Cranmer. 1570, p. 1692; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Ridley was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for a chance to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms. 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Ridley, Thomas Cranmer and Hugh Latimer from the Marshalsea.1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97.

During Bradford's second examination, Doctor Seton described Ridley and Latimer as being unable to answer anything at all at their examinations. 1570, p. 1786, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1607.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Foxe recounts the life of Ridley. 1563, pp. 1283-96, 1570, pp. 1895-96, 1576, pp. 1623-24, 1583, pp. 1717-30.

Ridley was kind to Heath, archbishop of York during Edward VI's reign. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley was kind to Edmund Bonner's mother. She would dine at Ridley's manor in Fulham with Ridley and Mistress Mungey, Bonner's sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley's sister and her husband, George Shipside, were also kind to Bonner's mother and sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1717-18.

Ridley was converted through the reading of Bertram's Book of the Sacrament, and confirmed in his beliefs through conference with Cranmer and Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1895, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

After Mary's accession, Ridley was kept first in the Tower, then in the Bocardo in Oxford, and then held in custody at Master Irish's house until his death. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1624, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley was cast into Bocardo prison with Hugh Latimer. 1563, p. 1285, 1583, p. 1718.

A conference took place between Ridley and Latimer in prison on the objections of Antonian, in other words, those of a popish persecutor, such as Winchester. 1563, pp. 1285-94, 1583, pp. 1718-24.

Letters of Ridley. 1570, pp. 1896-1902, 1576, pp. 1624-30, 1583, pp. 1724-30.

A letter was sent by Ridley to West, in which Ridley asked West and also Dr Harvey to remember their promises to him. Foxe also includes West's letter and Ridley's response. 1570, pp. 1900-01, 1576, pp. 1627-28, 1583, pp. 1728-29.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. He mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins, a weaver, had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote this letter. He had heard that West had relented, and Grimald been cast into the Marshalsea. He had also heard that Thomas Ridley, of the Bull-head in Cheapside, had died. He had heard that his brother-in-law, Shipside, had spent much time in prison but was now released. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

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The examination of Ridley and Latimer by White (Lincoln) and Brookes (Gloucester) took place on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from Cardinal Poole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

A communication took place between Ridley and Brookes in Irish's house on 15 October, on which day he was degraded, and at which Edridge ('reader then of the Greek lecture') was present.. 1563, pp. 1374-76, 1570, pp. 1934-35, 1576, pp. 1659-60, 1583, pp. 1768-69.

Ridley had a discussion with Brookes on 16 October, on which day he was degraded. 1563, pp. 1374-76.

Foxe recounts the behaviour of Ridley at supper the night before he was martyred. 1563, pp. 1376-79, 1570, pp. 1936-37, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Foxe recounts the behaviour of Ridley and Latimer at their martyrdom. 1563, pp. 1376-1379, 1570, pp. 1937-39, 1576, pp. 1661-62, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley gave his gown and tippet to Shipside. 1563, p. 1377, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley gave a new groat to Henry Lea. 1563, p. 1377, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley spoke with Lord Williams before his martyrdom. 1563, p. 1379, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1662, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley's friendly farewell. 1563, pp. 1379-81, 1570, pp. 1939-43, 1576, pp. 1622-28, 1583, pp. 1770-76.

Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which he makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Cranmer was confirmed in his reformist beliefs after conference with Ridley. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

In the third year of Edward's reign, Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley admitted Robert Drakes to minister the sacraments. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Letter to Augustine Bernher [BL, Harley 416, fo.16v. Printed in LM, p. 72 et seq. Also in 1570, p. 1902 et seq.].

Letter to Augustine Bernher [BL Harley 416, fos.17v and 32r. Not printed in Foxe or LM].

Letter to Bernher [BL Harley 416, fo.32r. Not printed in AM or LM.]

Letter to Bradford. [BL Harley 416, fo.32v. Printed in LM, pp. 62 et seq. and 1570, p. 1897 et seq.]

Foxe records Nicholas Ridley's writings against idolatry. 1583, pp. 2128-31.

Lord Dacre would have paid a ransom to Mary for his kinsman Nicholas Ridley's life if it were possible but she refused. 1563, p. 1733, 1583, p. 2131.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Philip Melancthon (Philipp Schwartzerdt)

(1497 - 1560) [C. Scott Dixon, M. Greengrass, www.leedstrinity.ac.uk/histcourse/reformat/biograph.htm]

Educated at Heidelberg (1509 - 12) and Tübingen (1512 - 18); professor of Greek at Wittenberg 1518; protestant reformer, associate of Luther; split the Lutheran movement

In his oration for his BTh at Cambridge, Hugh Latimer spoke against Philip Melancthon. He was heard by Thomas Bilney, who converted him to a reformed position. 1570, p. 1146; 1576, p. 981; 1583, p. 1008.

Robert Barnes fled England and went to Germany, where he found favour with Luther, Melancthon, Bugenhagen, Justus Jonas, Hegendorph, Aepinus, the duke of Saxony and the king of Denmark. 1563, p. 603; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1165; 1583, p. 1194.

Melancthon wrote a letter to Henry VIII against the Six Articles. In it he complained of the imprisonment of Hugh Latimer, Edward Crome and Nicholas Shaxton. 1570, pp. 1340-44; 1576, pp. 1144-47; 1583, pp. 1172-76.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Bilney

(d. 1531)

Preacher and Martyr. Of Norwich. [DNB]

Thomas Bilney brought God's word to the town of Hadleigh, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1065; 1570, p. 1693; 1576, p. 1445; 1583, p. 1518.

Latimer would walk and talk on 'Heretykes hyll' with Bilney. 1563, pp. 1307-8, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer went with Bilney to visit prisoners in the Tower in Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney spoke to a woman in prison who was accused of killing her own child. Latimer spoke to Henry VIII after a sermon he gave at Windsor and tried to get the woman pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

The woman gave birth to another child and Latimer became godfather, Mistress Cheek godmother. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney gave the woman spiritual counselling and eventually she was pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thirkeston [Thurcaston]
NGR: SK 564 104

A parish in the western division of the hundred of Gascote, county of Leicester. 3.25 miles south-south-west from Mountsorrel. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Leicester and Diocese of Lincoln.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1754 [1730]

Q. Mary. The story and lyfe of M. Latymer, Preacher and Martyr.

MarginaliaAnno. 1555. October.regno Angliæ, in omnibus Archiepiscopis, Episcopis, Decanis, Prebendarijs, Sacerdotibus Ecclesiarum, & in toto clero: 

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The preceding passages, translated into English, read: 'all the reformations of studies and statutes [which were] recently accomplished are now again deformed and abolished and everything reduced to its original chaos and ancient popery: all the heads of colleges who favoured the sincerity of the gospel, or who were married, are removed from their places and replaced by others of the popish faction and I hear this also of those fellows who could not bow their knees to Baal. This is not surprising, for this has happened throughout the kingdom of England, to all archbishops, bishops, deans, prebendaries, ministers of churches and all the clergy'.

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and to tell you muche naughty matter in fewe woordes, Papismus apud nos vbique in pleno suo antiquo robore regnat.  
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'Papistry reigns everywhere among us in all of its ancient strength'.

MarginaliaVnthankefull receauing of Gods great giftes and graces.The Lord be mercyfull, and for Christes sake pardon vs our olde vnkyndesse and vnthankefulnesse: for when he powred vppon vs the gyftes of his manifolde graces and fauoure (alas) we did not serue him nor render vnto hym thankes according to the same. MarginaliaColdenes of pastors. corruption of Magistrates, waywardnes of the people, prouoked Gods wrathe.We pastors manye of vs were to colde and bare to much (alas) with the wicked worlde, our Magistrates did abuse to their owne worldly gayne, both Gods Gospell and the ministers of the same. The people in many places was wayward and vnkynde. Thus of euery side and of euery sorte we haue prouoked Gods anger and wrath to fall vppon vs: but blessed myght he be that that not suffered his to continue in those wayes, which so wholly haue displeased his secrete Maiestie, but hath awaked them by the fatherly correction of his owne sonnes crosse, vnto his glorie and our endlesse saluation, through Iesus Christe our Lorde.

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My dayly prayer is (as God doth know) and by gods grace shall be so long as I lyue in this worlde, for you my deare brethren that are fled out of your owne Country, because you will rather forsake all worldly thynges then the truth of Gods worde. It is euen the same that I vse to make to GOD for all those Churches abroad through the worlde, which haue forsaken the kyngdome of Antichrist, and professed openly the puritie of the Gospell of Iesus Christ: MarginaliaThe prayer of B. Ridley for all the Churches abroad which openly professe the Gospell of Christ Iesus.that is, that God our eternall father for our Sauiour Christes sake, will dayly encrease in you the gracious gifte of his heauenly spirite to the true settyng forth of his glory and of his Gospell, and make you to agree brotherly in the truth of the same, that there arise no rote of bitternesse among you that may infect that good seede which God hath sowen in your hartes already, and finally that your lyfe may be so pure and so honest, accordyng to the rule of Gods worde, and according to that vocation whereunto we are called by þe Gospell of Christ our Sauiour, that the honesty and purity of the same may prouoke all that shall see or knowe it, to the loue of your doctrine, and to loue you for your honesty and vertues sake, and so both in brotherly vnity of your true doctrine and also in the Godly vertue of your honest lyfe, to glorifie our father which is in heauen.

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Ex nostratibus magni aliquot magistratus, Cancellarius Wint. 

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Stephen Gardiner, bishop of Winchester and lord chancellor.

Comes Arundellus, & Dominus Pachetus iam legatione funguntur, vna cum Cardinali Polo, in partibus transmarinis, ad componendam (vt aiunt) pacem inter imperatorem, regem nostrum,  
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Phillip, the consort of Queen Mary.

& Francorum regem. MarginaliaB. Ridley prayeth for Q. Mary.Post illorum magistratuum nostrorum reditum, & partum reginæ, 
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Mary was going into confinement, or seclusion, because she was believed, inaccurately, to be pregnant and this was the custom before giving birth.

quem iam quotidie expectamus & iam aliquandiu expectauimus, quemq; Deus pro sui nominis gloria dignetur bene illi fortunare: nos tunc statim nihil aliud quam nostræ confessionis de hoste nostro antiquo triumphales in domino coronas expectamus.  
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I.e., Ridley expects that he Latimer and Cranmer will be martyred.

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Omnium vestrṷm precibus me humillime ex toto corde commendo: In primis, tuis o chariss in Christo frater, & delectiss. Grindalle, & chariss. fratrum & vnicè mihi in domino delectorum, Checi, Coxi, Turneri Leueri, Sampsonis, Chamberi, 

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Sir John Cheke had been imprisoned at the start of Mary's reign but had been released in the spring of 1554 and arrived in Strasbourg on 14 April. He journeyed on, reaching Padua in July and would remain in Italy until the spring of 1555. William Turner had fled England in September 1553 and went to Emden and subsequently traveled throughout Germany. Thomas Sampson's movements are mysterious although he eventually arrived in Strasbourg. Thomas Lever, on the other hand, arrived in Frankfurt in February 1555 and took a prominent role in the disputes there. Richard Chambers, the moneyman for the Marian exiles, settled in Zurich in 1554, but his movements would have been known to Grindal. Richard Cox was committed to the Marshalsea on 5 August 1553 but was released into house arrest two weeks later. He made his escape in May 1554, arriving in Strasbourg in June 1554. He arrived in Frankfurt in March 1555, becoming the chief opponent of John Knox in the dispute over whether the Book of Common Prayer or the Genevan liturgy would be used by the English congregation there.

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& omnium fratrum nostrorum & conterraneorum qui apud vos degunt & deligunt dominum nostrum Iesum Christum in veritate. Commendo etiam vobis reuerendiss. patres & concaptiuos meos in domino Thomam Cranmerum, iam veri magni pastoris & Archipresulis nomine digniss. & veteranum illum Christi & nostræ gentis Anglicanæ verum Apostolum Hugonem Latimerum Condona mihi frater harum prolixitatem, non enim post hac credo charissime frater, meis literis iam amplius aliquando turbaberis. Oxonij.  
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The preceding two paragraphs read, in translation: 'Some of our great magistrates, Chancellor Winchester [Stephen Gardiner, bishop of Winchester and lord chancellor], the earl of Arundel, and Lord Paget, are joined overseas with Cardinal Pole on an embassy to negotiate (as they say) peace between the emperor, our king [Phillip, the consort of Queen Mary], and the king of France. After the return of the magistrates and the confinement of the queen, which we now expect anyday, indeed we have expected it for some time - and which may God for the glory of his name undertake to make fortunate for her - we then expect nothing more than the triumphal crowns of our confession immediately from our ancient enemy [i.e., Ridley, Cranmer and Latimer expect to be martyred].

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I commend myself in all humility and with all my heart to the prayers of all of you; in you primarily, Grindal, a most dear and cherished brother in Christ, and of those most dear brothers to me, the Lord's beloved, Cheke, Cox, Turner, Lever, Sampson, Chambers and all our brothers and countrymen who abide among you and love our Lord Jesus Christ in truth. I also commend to you the most reverend fathers, and my fellow captives in the Lord, Thomas Cranmer, now truly most worthy of the name of chief pastor and archbishop, and that veteran, the true apostle of the English people and of Christ, Hugh Latimer. Forgive me, brother, for the verbosity of this letter, for after this, I believe, most dear brother, that you will never again be troubled with letters of mine'.

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N. R.

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¶ To Augustine Bernher. 
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From the reference to the burning of John Rogers this letter must have been written fairly soon after 4 February 1555. This letter was first printed in Letters of the Martyrs, pp. 72-73 and was reprinted in the 1570 edition, and all subsequent editions, of the Acts and Monuments. The orginal letter survives in Foxe's papers (ECL 260, fo. 278r-v); copies of the letter are Harley 416, fo. 16v and ECL 260, fos. 269r-270r and 283r.

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MarginaliaA letter of B. Ridley to one Austen Bernher.BRother Augustine, I blesse God with all my hart in his manifolde mercifull gyftes, geuen vnto our deare breathren in Christ, especially to our brother Rogers, whom it pleased to set forth fyrst; no doubt but of his gracious goodnes and fatherly fauour towardes hym. MarginaliaCommemoration of Saintes.And likewyse blessed be God in the rest, as Hoper, Saunders, and Taylour, whom it hath pleased the Lord likewyse to set in the forefront of the battayle agaynst his aduersaries, and hath endued them all (so farre as I can heare) to stand in the confession of his truth, and to be content in his cause, and for his Gospels sake to lose their lyfe. 

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Ridley is refering to the examinations of John Hooper, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor by Stephen Gardiner at the end of January 1555 and their refusal to recant.

And euermore and without ende blessed be euen the same our heauenly father for our deare and entirely beloued brother Bradford, whom nowe the Lorde (I perceiue) calleth for: for I weene  
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I believe

he will no longer vouchsafe him to abide among the adulterous and wicked generation of this worlde,. I do not doubt but that he (for those giftes of grace whiche the Lorde hath bestowed on hym plente-

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ously) hath holpen those which are gon before in their iourney, that is, hath animated and encouraged them to keepe the hygh way, & sic currere vti tandem acciperent præmium. The Lord be his comfort, whereof I do not doubt, and I thanke God hartely that euer I was acquainted with him, and that euer I had such a one in my house. And yet agayne I blesse GOD in our deare brother, and of this tyme Protomartyr Rogers, 

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Obviously this passage was written after the execution of Rogers on 4 February 1555.

MarginaliaProtomartyr is the first martyr. whom he so called, because he was the first that suffered here in those bloudy dayes.that he was also one of my calling to be a Prebendary Preacher of London. And now because Grindall is gone (the Lorde I doubt not hath and knoweth wherein he will bestow him) I trust to God it shall please him of his goodnes to strengthen me to make vp the trinitie out of Paules Churche, 
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Rogers was a prebend of St Paul's in London. Grindal had been precentor of the cathedral. Ridley is anticipating the martyrdom of John Bradford (another prebend) and of himself (the bishop) to make up a trinity of martyrs from St Paul's.

to suffer for Christe, whom God the father hath annoynted, the holy spirite doth beare witnes vnto, Paule & all the Apostles preached. Thus fare you well. I had no paper:  
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Cattley/Pratt, VII, 437, fn 1

Bishop Ridley's expression, "I had no paper," is at once accounted for on inspecting the autograph of his letter in the Emmanuel College Library, as it is written on the reverse of that addressed to him by Bernher. See Letter 24 in PS. Ridley, and Letter 78 in PS. Bradford. - ED.

I was constrayned thus to write. 
Commentary  *  Close

The meaning of this passage is made clear from the original letter. Short of paper, Ridley wrote this letter to Bernher on the back of a letter which Bernher had sent to him.

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Besydes these letters of Byshop Ridley, diuers other tractations also were written by hym, partly out of prison, partly in prison: as namely amongest certaine other, there remayneth in my handes, certayne notes answearing to the two notable Sermons of D. Watson, Bishop of Lincolne. &c.

¶ Here beginneth the lyfe, actes, and doynges of maister Hugh Latimer, the famous Preacher and worthy Martyr of Christ and his Gospel. 
Commentary  *  Close
The Life of Hugh Latimer

The account of Latimer's life appeared in the 1563 edition. (There is nothing on Latimer's life in the Rerum, which is a powerful indication of the pressure on Foxe to sacrifice material in order to complete the work on time). Foxe's sources for the 1563 account are largely Latimer's own sermons and letters, Latimer's own descriptions of his early life (it is worth remembering that Foxe knew Latimer personally) and Augustine Bernher's dedication to the collection of Latimer's sermons which he edited. Bernher also probably contributed his own memories of Latimer and this may well have also been true of Mary Glover, Latimer's niece.

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Even by the low standards of the 1563 edition, the account of Latimer was poorly organised, and one major difference between it and the 1570 account of Latimer was the rearranging of the materials in it into a logical and chronological order. Another major difference was the pruning back of documents: Latimer's 'card' sermons, the citation sent to him by the bishop of Salisbury, Latimer's letter to Archbishop Warham, the ban on his preaching and the articles imputed to him were all dropped from this edition. But if documents were deleted, information from individual informants was added on Latimer's disputes with various friars in Cambridge.

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The 1570 version of Latimer's life was printed without change in 1576. In the 1583 edition, with paper in abundant supply, all of the documentation removed from the account of Latimer's life in the 1570 edition was restored, although the second 'card' sermon was relegated to an appendix.

 
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Cattley/Pratt, VII, 437, fn 2

{Cattley/Pratt alters this section of the text} See Edition 1563, p. 1297. Appendix:This portion of Foxe's text is given according to the text of 1563, having been needlessly tinkered and much spoilt in the subsequent editions.

MarginaliaThe story of M. Hugh Latimer Martyr.NOw consequently after the lyfe of B. Ridley, with other his letters, whiche partly we haue expressed, partly we haue differred to our later appendix, followeth lykewyse the lyfe and doynges of the worthy champion, and olde practised souldiour of Christe M. Hugh Latimer, of whose actes and long trauayles euen from his fyrst yeares and tender age, to beginne here to entreate: fyrst, he was the son of one Hugh Latimer, of Thirkesson in the Countie of Leicester, a housebandman of right good estimation: with whom also he was brought vp vntyll he was of the age of fower yeares or thereabout. At which tyme his Parentes (hauyng hym as then left for their onely sonne, with sixe other daughters) seeyng his ready, prompte, and sharpe witte, purposed to trayne him vp in erudition, and knowledge of good literature: wherein he so profited in his youth, at the common Scholes of his owne countrey, MarginaliaM. Latimer first set to schoole.that at the age of xiiij. yeares, he was sent to the Vniuersitie of Cambridge. MarginaliaM. Latimer sent to Cambridge.Where after some continuaunce of exercises in other thynges, he gaue hym selfe to the studie of such schole Diuinitie, as þe ignoraunce of that age did suffer.

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MarginaliaM. Latimer a long tyme was a zealous and superstitious Papist.Zelous he was then in the Popyshe Religion, and therewith so scrupulous (as hym selfe confessed) that beyng a Priest, and vsyng to say Masse, he was so seruile an obseruer of the Romishe Decrees, that he had thought he had neuer sufficiently mingled his Massing wine with water: and moreouer, that he shoulde neuer be damned, if he were once a professed Frier, 

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Foxe is basing this claim on a passage in Latimer's first letter to Sir Edward Baynton.

with diuers suche superstitious fantasies. And in this blinde zeale he was a very enemie to the professours of Christes Gospell: as both his Oration made when he proceeded Bachlour of Diuinitie, agaynst Philip Melancthon, MarginaliaM. Latimer declamed in Cambridge agaynst Melancthon.and also his other workes did playnely declare. But especially his Popyshe zeale coulde in no case abyde in those dayes good Maister Stafford,  
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Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 437, line 9 from the bottom

On Stafford ... it would seem that he took his B. D. degree at or about the same time with Latimer.

In the Register of West, Bp. of Ely, at folio 83, an Ordination is recorded as taking place at the Chapel in Ely Palace, Ely, Saturday, March 7th, 1516-17, when among the "Subdiaconi seculares" appears the name of "Georgius Stawert, Dunelmen. dioc. per lit. dim. Aulæ Pembrochiæ Cant." And from the same Register, fol. 83 b., he appears to have been ordained Deacon three weeks after, at the same place, Saturday, March 28th, 1517, "ad titulum collegii Valenciæ Mariæ Cant. predict."

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The following grace for George Stafford's B. D. degree will, perhaps, be acceptable to the reader: -

In the year Michs. 1523 - Michs. 1524: "Item conceditur Georgio Stavert ut sex anni à suâ regentiâ [i. e. his M. A. degree], cum unâ responsione et duobus sermonibus, altero ad Clerum et altero ad crucem Pauli, sufficiant sibi ad opponendum in theologiâ, sic quod admittatur intra quindenam."

reader of the Diuinitie Lectures in Cambridge, moste spitefully raylyng agaynst hym, and willyng the youth of Cambridge, in no wyse to beleeue hym.

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Notwithstandyng suche was the goodnesse and mercifull purpose of God, that when he saw his good tyme, by the whiche waye hee thought to haue vtterly defaced the professours of the Gospell and true Church of Christ, he was at lengthe hym selfe by a member of the same, pretily caught in the blessed nette of Gods woorde. MarginaliaLatymer conuerted by M. Bilney.For M. Thomas Bilney 

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Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 437, last line

Bilney appears from the Tunstal (London) Register to have been ordained subdeacon at the priory of Elsing, London, by John suffragan bishop of Calipolis, on Saturday, March 19th, 1518-19; "Thomas Bylney, Norwicen. dioc. per lit. dim. ad titulum prioratûs sive monasterii Sancti Bartholomæi in Smythfeld London." And from the Register of West, bishop of Ely, folio 87, it appears that he was ordained deacon by bishop West at Dodington, June 18th, 1519. The entry is as follows: -

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"Thomas Bylney Nor. dioc. sufficienter dimissus, ad titulum prioratûs sancti Bartholomæi in Smythfeld London, in presbyterum [lege diaconum] admissus." And on the same folio, at the ordination on Saturday, 24th September, of the same year, we find: "Dominus Thomas Bylney, Nor. dioc. diaconus, sufficienter dimissus, ad titulum Mon. sive prioratûs Sancti Bartholomæi in Smythfeld, in presbyterum admissus."

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And it further appears from the Proctors' Accounts at Cambridge, that he took the B. C. L. degree in 1520-21.

"Recepta a bachalaureis in jure canonico pro ordinariis et pro locatione cathedræ.

"In primis

s.d.
a domino goodman68
- petytt68
- duke100
- davy100
- dale134
- doughty134
- clapam68
- wylne100
- pateper68
- north68
- bilney - -
Summa4134
Bilney appears to have paid nothing otherwise than in the form of a caution for future payment: this appears in an after entry; "Cautio domini bilney in manibus Magistri Medow." The University chest was formerly stocked with Cautions for people who had not money at hand: these cautions were pieces of plate, rings, missals, &c. If the cautions were not redeemed, the goods were sold.

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The following entry is from the Register of West, bishop of Ely, fol. 33: -

"Item xxiijtio die mensis predict. [Julii] Anno Dni. et loco suprascriptis [i. e. A. D. 1525, intra manerium suum de Somersham] dominus concessit licentiam magistro Thomæ Bylney in jure canonico Bacchalaurio ad prædicandum populo sibi commisso per totam dioc. Elien. temporibus et locis congruis, Absque tamen alieni juris præjuditio, ad beneplacitum suum duraturam," &c.

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In the margin we read: "Revocata fuit hæc Licentia per spiritualem Inhibitionem quia super heretica pravitate accusatus et convictus erat."

(whose storye is before described) beyng at that tyme a tryer out of Sathans subtilties, and a secrete ouerthrower of Antichristes kyngdome, seeyng M. Latimer to haue a zeale in his waies (although without knowledge) was striken with a brotherly pittie towardes hym, & bethought by what meanes he might best winne this zelous ignoraunt brother, to the true knowledge of Christe. Wherefore, after a shorte tyme, he came to M. Latimers study, and desired him to here him make his confession. Which thing he willingly graunted: by hearyng whereof, he was (through the good spirte of God) so touched, that hereuppon he forsooke his former studying of the schole Doctors, and other suche fopperies, and became an earnest student of true Diuinitie, as he hym selfe, aswell in his conference with M. Ridley, as also in his fyrst sermom made vpon the Pater noster,  
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A somewhat different account of Latimer's conversion, which Foxe did not use, was sent to Foxe by Ralph Morrice, Cranmer's private secretary and a friend of Latimer's (BL, Harley MS 422, fos. 84r-87r).

doth confesse.

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So
PPPP. iij.
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