Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1755 [1731]

Queene Mary. The story and lyfe of M. Latymer, Preacher and Martyr.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. October.So that whereas before he was an enemy, and almost a persecutor of Christe, he was now a zelous seeker after him, chaunging his old maner of cauilling and rayling, into a diligent kind of conferring, both with M. Bilney and others, & came also to M. Stafford before he dyed, and desired him to forgeue him. MarginaliaRead M. Latimers owne confession in his first Sermon vpon the Pater Noster. M. Latimer a Papist, turned to a zealous Christian.

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After this his winning to Christ, he was not satisfied with his owne conuersion onely, but like a true Disciple of the blessed Samaritane, pitied the misery of others, and therefore became both a publike Preacher,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 438, line 20

Latimer seems to have possessed a predilection for preaching previous to his conversion, for we find him in the Proctors' Accounts as one of twelve University preachers appointed in 1522.

and also a priuate Instructer to the rest of his brethren within the Vniuersitie, MarginaliaM. Latimer becommeth a Preacher in Cambridge.by the space of 3. yeres, 
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'Two years' in 1563, corrected to three years in 1570.

 
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Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 438, line 22

The edition of 1563 reads "2 yeres," that of 1570 "iij yeres," which all the rest follow... This period of three years seems intended by Foxe to include the space between Latimer's conversion and his appearance before Wolsey.

spending his tyme partly in the Latin tongue among the learned, & partly amongst the simple people in his naturall and vulgar language. Howbeit, as Satan neuer slepeth when he seeth his kingdome to begin to decay, so likewyse now seeyng that this worthy member of Christ would be a shreud shaker therof he raised vp his impious impes to molest & trouble him. MarginaliaEnemyes styrred in Cambridge agaynst M. Latimer.

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Amongest these there was an Augustine Frier, who tooke occasion vpon certaine Sermons that M. Latimer made about Christenmas 1529. aswell in the church of S. Edward, as also in S. Augustins, within the Vniuersitie in Cambridge, to inuey against him, for that M. Latimer in the sayde Sermons 

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Cattley/Pratt, VII, Appendix: ref page 438, line 19 from the bottom

Fuller, in his History of Cambridge, places Latimer's Card Sermons in the vice-chancellor's year 1527-8: certainly they must be misplaced by Foxe here, if 1529 be their correct date, for he subsequently mentions his citation before Wolsey, who was in disgrace Christmas 1529, and died in November 1530. Dr. Corrie (Preface to the Parker Society's Latimer's Remains) places the Card Sermons subsequent to the appearance before Wolsey. It is highly probable that Latimer got into trouble through his faithful preaching long before the Card Sermons in 1529; and that Foxe confounded the two occasions, and was thus led to transpose the order of events in his narrative. Becon, in his "Jewel of Joy," published toward the close of 1547, says that he remembered how "before twenty years" he used to attend Latimer's preaching at Cambridge, and how he pleaded for the use of the English Scriptures, and inveighed against the monks and friars, and was persecuted by them. (Parker Soc. Edit. p. 424.) This would correspond with the latter part of 1527: and it is probable that Latimer was summoned before the Cardinal some time the next year.

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(alludyng to the common vsage of the season) gaue the people certaine cardes out of the 5. 6. 7. Chapiters of S. Matthewe, whereupon they might, not onely then, but alwayes els occupy their tyme. MarginaliaM. Latimers Preaching of the Cardes in Cambridge.For the chiefe triumph in the cardes he limitted the Hart as the principall thing that they shoulde serue God with all: wherby he quite ouerthrew all hypocriticall and externall ceremonies, not tending to the necessarie furtheraunce of Gods holy word and Sacramentes. For the better atteyneng hereof, he wished the Scriptures to be in Englysh, 
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This sermon has not survived.

 
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Cattley/Pratt, VII, 438, fn 3

The Sermon on which this topic is handled, has not come down to us. - ED.

wherby the common people might the better learne their dueties, aswell to God, as their neighbours.

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The handling of this matter was so apt for the tyme, and so pleasantly applyed of him, that not only it declared a singuler towardnesse of witte in the Preacher, but also wrought in the hearers much fruite, to the ouerthrowe of Popish superstition, and setting vp of perfect Religion.

This was vpon the Sundaye before Christenmas day, on which day commyng to the Church, and causyng the Bell to be tolled to a Sermon, he entered into þe Pulpit, takyng for his text the wordes of the Gospell aforesayd, red in the Church that day: Tu quis es. &c. []In deliueryng the whiche cardes (as is abouesayd) he made the Harte to be triumph, exhortyng and inuityng all men thereby to serue the Lord with inwarde hart and true affection, and not with outward ceremonies: adding moreouer to the prayse of that triumph, that though it were neuer so small, yet it woulde make vp the best cote carde beside in the bunch, yea though it were þe kyng of Clubs. &c. meanyng thereby, MarginaliaThe difference betweene true & false religion.how the Lorde would be worshipped and serued in simplicitie of the harte and veritie, wherein consisteth true Christian Religion, and not in the outward deedes of the letter onely, or in the glisteryng shewe of mans traditions, or pardons, pilgrimages, ceremonies, vowes, deuotions, voluntarie workes, and workes of supererogation, foundations, oblations, the Popes supremacie. &c. so that all these either were nedeles, where the other is present: or els were of small estimation, in comparison of the other.

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The tenour and effect of these his Sermons, so far as they could come to our handes, here foloweth.

¶ The tenoure and effecte of certayne Sermons, made by mayster Latimer in Cambridge, about the yeare of our Lord. 1529. 
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This first 'card' sermon was printed in 1563, dropped from the 1570 and 1576 editions, but was restored in the 1583 edition. The two 'card' sermons printed by Foxe were part of a longer series of sermons 'on the card' which Latimer preached at Cambridge in Advent and Christmas 1529. (Their name derived from Latimer's using the traditional card games played during these holidays as props and themes to his sermons). Interestingly, these two sermons did not appear in any of the compendious editions of Latimer's sermons which were printed by John Day. Just as the Acts and Monuments was intertwined with, and yet distinct from the Letters of the Martyrs, so Foxe's account of Latimer and his writings was intertwined with, but distinct from, Day's editions of Latimer's sermons.

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TV quis es? which wordes are as much to say in Englyshe, Who art thou? These be the wordes of the Phariseis, which were sent by the Iewes vnto sainct Iohn Baptist in wildernesse, to haue knowledge of hym, whom he was, which woordes they spake vnto hym of an euill intent, thinkyng that he would haue taken on hym to be Christe, and so they woulde haue had him done with their good willes, because they knewe that he was more carnall, and geuen to their lawes, then Christ in deede should be, as they perceyued by their old prophecies: and also because they maruayled muche of his great doctryne, preachyng, and baptising, they were in doubt whether he was Christ or not: wherefore they sayd vnto him, who art thou? Then answered sainct Iohn, and confessed, that he was not Christ. Now here is to be noted, the great, and prudent answere of saincte Iohn Baptist vnto the Phariseis, that when they required of him whom he was, he would not directly answere of himselfe what he was him selfe: but he sayd he was not Christ, by the which saying he thought to put the Iewes and Phariseis out of their false

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opinion, & beliefe towardes him, in that they would haue had him to exercise the office of Christ, and so declared farther vnto them of Christ, saying: he is in þe middes of you, and amongst you, whō ye know not, whose latchet of his shoe I am not worthy to vnlose, or vndoe. By this you may perceiue that saint Iohn spake much in the laude, and prayse of Christ his maister, professing himselfe to be in no wise like vnto him. So likewise it shalbe necessary vnto all men & women of this world, not to ascribe vnto them selues any goodnes of themselues, but all vnto our Lorde God, as shall appeare hereafter, when this question aforesayd, (Who art thou?) shall be moued vnto thē: not as the Phariseis did vnto saint Iohn, of an euill purpose, but of a good and simple minde, as may appeare hereafter.

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Now then, according to the preachers mynd, let euery man and woman, of a good & simple mind, contrary to the Phariseis intent, aske this question (Who art thou?) this question must be moued to themselues, what they be of themselues, on this fashion. What art thou of thy only and natural generatiō betwene father, & mother, whē thou camest into this world? What substāce, what vertue, what goodnes art thou of by thy selfe? which question if thou reherse often times vnto thy selfe, thou shalt well perceiue, & vnderstand, how that thou shalt make aunswer vnto it, which must be made on this wayes: I am of my selfe, and by my selfe, cōming from my naturall father & mother, the childe of the ire, & indignation of God, the true inheritour of hel, a lumpe of sinne, & working nothing of my selfe but all towardes hell, except I haue better helpe of an other, then I haue of my selfe. Now we may see in what state we enter in to this world, that we be of our selues the true, and iust inheritours of hell, the children of the ire & indignation of Christ, working all towardes hell, whereby we deserue of our selues perpetuall dampnation, by þe ryght iudgement of God, and the true clayme of our selues: which vnthrifty state that we be borne vnto, is come vnto vs for our own desertes, and proueth well this example followyng.

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Let it be admitted for the probatiō of this, that it might please the kynges grace now being, to accept into his fauour a meane man, of a simple degre, and byrth, not borne to any possession, whom the kynges grace fauoureth, not because this person hath of himselfe deserued any such fauoure, but that the kyng casteth this fauoure vnto him of his owne mere motion, & fantasy: and for because þe kings grace will more declare his fauoure vnto him, he geueth vnto his sayd man a thousand poundes in landes, to hym and his heyres, on this condition, that he shall take vpon him to be the chiefe captayne, and defendour of his towne of Calice, and to be trew, and faythfull vnto hym, in the custodie of the same, agaynst the Frenche men specially, aboue all other enemies.

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This man taketh on hym this charge, promysing his fidelitie thereunto. It chaunceth in processe of tyme, that by the singuler acquaintaunce, and frequent familiaritie of this Captaine with the French men, these French men geue vnto this sayde Captayne of Calice a great summe of money, so that he will be content, and agreeable, that they may enter into the sayde towne of Calice by force of armes, and so thereby to possesse þe same vnto the Crowne of Fraunce: vpon this agreement the French men doe inuade the sayde Towne of Calice, alonely by the neglygence of this Captayne.

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Now the Kynges grace hearyng of this inuasion, commeth with a great puissaunce to defende this his sayd Towne, and so by good pollicie of warre ouercommeth the sayd French men, and entreth againe into his Towne of Calice. Then he beyng desyrous to knowe how these enemies of his came thyther, he maketh profound searche, and enquirie, by whom this treason was conspyred: by this searche it was knowen and founde, his owne Captayne to be the very authoure and beginner of the betraying of it. The King seeing the great infidelitie of this person, dischargeth this man of his office, and taketh from him and his heyres, this thousande poundes possessions. Thinke you not but the Kyng doth vse iustice vnto him, and all his posteritie, and heyres? Yes truely: the sayde Capitayne cannot deny hymselfe, but that he hadde true iustice, consyderyng howe vnfaythfully he behaued him to his Prince, contrary to his own fidelitie and promyse: so likewyse it was of our fyrst Father, Adam. He had geuen vnto him the spirite of science, & knowledge, to worke all goodnesse therewith: this sayd spirite was not geuen alonely vnto him, but vnto all his heyres and posteritie. He had also deliuered him the Towne of Calice, that is to say, Paradise in earth, the most strong and fayrest Towne in the worlde, to be in his custodie: He neuerthelesse, by the instigation of these Frenche menne, that is to say, the temptation of the Feende, dyd obey vnto their desire,

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