Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Mary's False Pregnancy32. Censorship Proclamation 33. Our Lady' Psalter 34. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain35. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 36. Bradford's Letters 37. William Minge 38. James Trevisam 39. The Martyrdom of John Bland 40. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 41. Sheterden's Letters 42. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 43. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 44. Nicholas Hall45. Margery Polley46. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 47. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 48. John Aleworth 49. Martyrdom of James Abbes 50. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 51. Martyrdom of John Newman52. Richard Hooke 53. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 54. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 55. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 56. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 57. Martyrdom of William Haile 58. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 59. William Andrew 60. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 61. Samuel's Letters 62. William Allen 63. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 64. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 65. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 66. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 67. Cornelius Bungey 68. John and William Glover 69. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 70. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 71. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 72. Ridley's Letters 73. Life of Hugh Latimer 74. Latimer's Letters 75. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed76. More Letters of Ridley 77. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 78. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 79. William Wiseman 80. James Gore 81. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 82. Philpot's Letters 83. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 84. Letters of Thomas Wittle 85. Life of Bartlett Green 86. Letters of Bartlett Green 87. Thomas Browne 88. John Tudson 89. John Went 90. Isobel Foster 91. Joan Lashford 92. Five Canterbury Martyrs 93. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 94. Letters of Cranmer 95. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 96. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 97. William Tyms, et al 98. Letters of Tyms 99. The Norfolk Supplication 100. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 101. John Hullier 102. Hullier's Letters 103. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 104. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 105. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 106. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 107. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 108. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 109. Gregory Crow 110. William Slech 111. Avington Read, et al 112. Wood and Miles 113. Adherall and Clement 114. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 115. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow116. Persecution in Lichfield 117. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 118. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 119. Examinations of John Fortune120. John Careless 121. Letters of John Careless 122. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 123. Agnes Wardall 124. Peter Moone and his wife 125. Guernsey Martyrdoms 126. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 127. Martyrdom of Thomas More128. Examination of John Jackson129. Examination of John Newman 130. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 131. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 132. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 133. John Horne and a woman 134. William Dangerfield 135. Northampton Shoemaker 136. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 137. More Persecution at Lichfield
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward Powell

(d. 1540)

D. D. (1506) [Foster]

Latimer refuted Dr Powell's articles. 1563, pp. 1309-11, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Enemies of Latimer were Powell of Salisbury, Wilson of Cambridge, Hubberdin and Sherwood. 1563, p. 1311, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Articles imputed to Latimer by Powell of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1654, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hugh Latimer

(1485 - 1555)

Bishop of Worcester (1535 - 1539). Martyr. Of Thirkeson, Leicester. [DNB]

Foxe relates Latimer's formative years. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, pp. 1903-04, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

Hugh Latimer, the martyr, was the son of Hugh Latimer of Thirkeson, Leicestershire. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

Latimer declaimed the work of Melancthon. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1734.

Foxe records a sermon Latimer preached at Cambridge in 1529. 1563, pp. 1298-1304, 1583, pp. 1731-35.

Foxe records another of Latimer's sermons, the subject of which was Turks. 1563, pp. 1304-07, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe records Latimer's sermon on how to play with certain cards. 1563, pp. 1298-1304, 1583, pp. 1731-34.

Buckenham, prior of the Black friars or Lady friars, attempted to show Latimer why scripture should not be in English by use of his cards. 1570, pp. 1903-04, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1734.

Dr Venetus, a Grey friar, berated Latimer in his sermons. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1734.

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College), Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College), Dr Norton (Master of Clare), Dr Philo (Master of Michael House), Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John), Dr Blith (of the King's Hall), Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College), Dr Palmes (Master of St. Nicholas hostel), Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's, Brikenden of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

[Back to Top]

Henry VIII appointed Richard Stokesley (Bishop of London), Stephen Gardiner (Bishop of Winchester), Richard Sampson (Bishop of Chichester), William Repps (Bishop of Norwich), Thomas Goodrich (Bishop of Ely), Hugh Latimer (Bishop of Worcester), Nicholas Shaxton (Bishop of Salisbury) and William Barlow (Bishop of St David's) to compose a book of ecclesiastical institutions called the Bishops' Book. 1563, p. 1472.

[Back to Top]

Dr West preached against Latimer at Barwell Abbey. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Barnes, prior of the Augustine friars, licensed Latimer to preach to the friars. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Articles were gathered out of Barnes' sermon against Master Tyrell, fellow of King's Hall, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer would walk and talk on 'Heretykes hyll' with Bilney. 1563, pp. 1307-08, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer went with Bilney to visit prisoners in the Tower in Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney spoke to a woman in prison who was accused of killing her own child. Latimer spoke to Henry VIII after a sermon he gave at Windsor and tried to get the woman pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

The woman gave birth to another child and Latimer became godfather, Mistress Cheek godmother. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney gave the woman spiritual counselling and eventually she was pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Dr Redman was an enemy of Latimer at Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe includes a copy in English and in Latin of a letter Latimer received from Dr Redman, who revoked him for the doctrine he taught, along with Latimer's brief response. 1563, p. 1308, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632 [English only], 1583, p. 1736.

Latimer subscribed to articles after three years' teaching and preaching at Cambridge. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1737.

Dr Buttes, the king's physician, housed Latimer while he was preaching in London. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer had been offered the benefice of West Kinton, Wiltshire, through the suit of Dr Buttes and Lord Cromwell. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer had been made bishop of Worcester, assisted by Cromwell and Buttes. 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer refuted Dr Powell's articles. 1563, pp. 1309-11, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Enemies of Latimer were Powell of Salisbury, Wilson of Cambridge, Hubberdin and Sherwood. 1563, p. 1311, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer was called to appear before William Wareham (archbishop of Canterbury) and John Stokesley (bishop of London) on 29 January 1531. 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

The wording in Tonstall's register seems to suggest that Latimer did subscribe. 1563, p. 1334, 1570, p.1907 , 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer was advanced to the post of bishop by Buttes and Cromwell. 1563, p. 1349, 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1633., 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer told Morrice that the mayor had appointed him to preach at Easter. 1563, p. 1314, 1570, p. 1910, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer prayed for Dr Wilson and his countrymen who disliked Latimer. 1563, p. 1317, 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

A friend of Latimer's told him that Wilson had gone to Beverley in Holdernesse and then on progress. 1563, p. 1317, 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer resigned his bishopric at the same time as Bishop Shaxton of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1634, 1583, p. 1740.

Articles were brought against Latimer. 1570, pp. 1926-28, 1576, pp. 1652-53, 1583, p. 1732.

Latimer was injured by a falling tree. He went to London for a remedy but was imprisoned in the Tower by the bishops in Edward's reign. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1738.

A justice in the diocese of Worcester bought land for his brother or for himself and and tried to have a poor man in the diocese damned. This man appealed to Latimer, who wrote to the gentleman about this. The gentleman later mended his ways and died prior to 1563. 1563, p .1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, pp. 1634-35, 1583, p. 1739.

[Back to Top]

Latimer preached in Stamford before the duchess of Suffolk in London in convocation and in the garden before King Edward at court. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1739.

He prophecied that plagues would come in Queen Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1354, 1570, p. 1909, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1740.

He believed that preaching the gospel would cost him his life and that was why Winchester was imprisoned. 1563, p. 1354, 1570, p. 1909, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1740.

Articles were imputed to Latimer by Powell of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1654, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Hubberdin railed against Latimer and also railed against Luther, Melancthon, Zwingli, Frith, and Tyndale. Hubberdin danced in the pulpit. 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1639, 1583, p. 1748.

On 4 September 1553, the privy council ordered Latimer to appear before them (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]; APC IV, p. 340).

On 13 September, Latimer appeared before the privy council and was committed to the Tower as a 'close prisoner' (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1704] - 1410]; APC IV, p. 345-46). [NB: Foxe did not reprint the description in the privy council register of Latimer's 'sedycious demeanour'].

Latimer was committed to the Tower on 17 September 1553 (1570, p. 1466; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1635). [Note that Foxe never corrected these inconsistent dates].

He was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, pp. 933 and 938; 1570, pp. 1593; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; 1583, p. 1430).

[There is a summary of Latimer's disputation on Wednesday 18 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, p. 934-35.]

Latimer disputed with Weston, Smith and the other catholic doctors on 18 April 1554 (1563, pp. 978-85; 1570, pp. 1622-27; 1576, pp. 1384-89; 1583, pp. 1454-59).

Latimer was summoned, together with Cranmer and Ridley, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant what he had said during the disputations. He was condemned and taken in custody by the bailiffs (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, pp. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-67).

He was brought out of the bailiff's house where he was being held, on 21 April 1554, to observe a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried a canopy over Weston. Latimer, however, thought he was about to be taken to execution and urged one Augustine Cooper to make a fire that would burn quickly. When he came to Carfax and understood that he was being taken to view the procession, Latimer refused to look at it and ran 'to one Spensers shop' (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, p. 1464).

[Back to Top]

Foxe mentions Latimer's condemnation and disputation in passing in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

Bullinger sent commendations to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554 (1570, p. 1692; 1576, p. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley from the Marshalsea(1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500).

The examination of Latimer and Ridley before White and Brookes took place on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from Cardinal Poole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

Latimer appeared at a second session with Brookes and White on 1 October 1555. 1570, pp. 1930-33, 1576, pp. 1758-59.

Ridley was cast into Bocardo prison with Hugh Latimer. 1563, p. 1285, 1583, p. 1718.

There was a conference between Ridley and Latimer in prison upon the objection of Antoman. 1563, pp. 1285-94, 1583, pp. 1718-24.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Bullinger sent commendations to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554. 1570, p. 1692; 1576, p. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley from the Marshalsea. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Foxe relates the behaviour of Ridley and Latimer at their martyrdom. 1563, pp. 1376-79, 1570, pp. 1937-39, 1576, pp. 1661-62, 1583, p. 1769.

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which Ridley makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Letters. 1563, pp. 1314-17, 1321-25, 1333-34, 1344-48, 1349-53, 1570, pp. , 1576, pp. , 1583, pp. 1736-37, 1741-42, 1745-56.

Hugh Latimer presented a new year's gift to Henry VIII. 1563, p. 1734.

Foxe includes one of Latimer's card sermons. 1583, p. 2142.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ralph Morrice

(fl. 1523 - 1570; born.1500?)

Secretary to Archbishop Thomas Cranmer.

Cranmer's secretary wrote to Buttes and Deny asking for Dr Lee to join the commission, lest nothing be learned by the commission. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1868.

Latimer wrote to Morrice concerning the articles against Latimer. 1563, p. 1314.

Morrice wrote a letter to William Buttes and Anthony Denny defending Richard Turner. Morrice was Turner's patron. 1570, p. 2043-44, 1576, pp. 1762-63, 1583, pp. 1868-70.

Morrice got Moyle to hear one of Turner's sermons in Easter week, his rehearsal sermon in his parish at Westwell. Moyle heard him before noon and after noon on the Wednesday and approved. 1570, p. 2043, 1576, p. 1762, 1583, p. 1869.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Hubberdine

(fl. 1539) [Emden, Oxford]

William Hubberdine was a preacher of no great learning or stable wit who only preached what the bishops told him. 1563, p. 1317.

Enemies of Latimer were Powell of Salisbury, Wilson of Cambridge, Hubberdin and Sherwood. 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Hubberdine railed against Latimer and also railed against Luther, Melancthon, Zwingli, Frith, and Tyndale. Hubberdine danced in the pulpit, fell and broke his leg. Wardens told him the pulpit was for preaching not dancing. 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1639, 1583, p. 1748.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
West Kington
NGR: ST 806 772

A parish in the hundred of Chippenham, county of Wiltshire. 8.5 miles west-north-west from Chippenham. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Wiltshire and Diocese of Salisbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
1765 [1741]

Queene Mary. The story and life of M. Latimer Martyr.

MarginaliaAnno 1555. October.haue obteined, but may proceed in all faythfulnes, to build and keepe vp the house and temple of the Lorde, to the aduansing of his glory, and our euerlasting comfort in hym. And thus much concerning the doings and laborious trauelles of M. Latimer. Now after these thinges thus finished, and discoursed perteining to the story of his lyfe, lette vs come to his letters which he wrote at diuers and sundry tymes from the first beginning of his preachinge, all which here to comprehend whiche he wrote both in English and Latine, lacke of space and place at this present will not permitte, neuertheles certayne we will take, and fyrst concerning the articles aboue mentioned, for the which he was troubled by the Priestes of the country about his benefice at West Kington: whiche hee writeth thereof to M. Morice, the copy thereof here foloweth.

[Back to Top]
Letters of M. Latimer. 
Commentary  *  Close
Latimer's Letters

There are surprisingly few letters of Hugh Latimer and, apart from his note to Joan Wilkinson, none from Mary's reign. Whether it was due to age, illness, or strict confinement, Latimer did not produce the extensive correspondence of other Marian prisoners. As a result, Foxe's section on Latimer's letters consists largely of Henrician writings.

[Back to Top]

Latimer's letters were first printed in the 1563 edition. In 1570, Foxe addeda disgression on Latimer's adversary Hubberdine, drawn from individual informants. He also added a conclusion to an incomplete letter which Latimer wrote to Henry VIII. As with the life of Latimer, material was deleted from the 1570 edition to save paper: the first letter to Sir Edward Baynton and a 1530 proclamation banning heretical books were removed . In the 1583 edition, the first letter to Sir Edward Baynton was reprinted.

[Back to Top]
¶ A Letter of M. Latimer to Mayster Morice, concerning the Articles written, which were falsely and vntruely layed agaynst him. 
Commentary  *  Close

Ralph Morrice, Archbishop Cranmer's secretary, was one of Foxe's most important informants. Interestingly, this letter was not sent to Foxe by Morrice. Morrice first began sending material to Foxe in 1566, while this letter first appeared in the 1563 edition.

MarginaliaA letter of M. Latimer to M. Morice.RIght worshipfull, and mine owne good mayster Morice, salutem in Christo Iesu. And I thanke you for all harty kindnesse, not onely heretofore shewed vnto me, but also that now of late, you would vouchsafe to write vnto me so poore a wretch, to my great comforte among all these my troubles. I trust and doubte nothing in it, but GOD will reward you for me, and supplye aboundauntly mine vnabilitie. &c. Mayster Morice you woulde wonder to know how I haue bene intreated at Bristow. MarginaliaNote the dissēbling inconstancy of Popish Priestes.I meane of some of the Priestes, which first desired me, welcommed me, made me cheare, hearde what I sayde, allowed my saying in all thinges whiles I was with them: when I was gone home to my Benefice, perceiuing that the people fauoured me so greatlye, and that the Maior had appoynted me to preache at Easter, MarginaliaInhibition procured against M. Latimer not to preach.priuilye they procured an inhibition for all them that had not the Bishoppes licence, which they knew well enough I had not, & so craftely defeated mayster Maiors appoyntment, pretending that they were sory for it, procuring also certayne Preachers to blatter against me, MarginaliaHubberdine and Powell preach agaynst M. Latimer.as Hubberdin and Powell, with other moe: whom when I had brought before the Maior and the wise Counsaile of the Towne, to know what they coulde lay to my charge, wherefore they so declaymed agaynst me, they sayde they spake of information: howbeit no man could be brought forth that would abide by any thing: So that they had place and time to belye me shamefully, but they had no place nor time to laye to my charge, when I was present and ready to make them answere. God amēd them, and swage their malice that they haue agaynst the truth & me. &c.

[Back to Top]
Our Lady was a Sinner.

So they did belye me to haue sayd, when I had sayd nothing so, but to reproue certayne both Priestes and beneficed menne, whiche doe geue so muche to our Ladye, MarginaliaWhat the Papistes do geue to our Lady.as though she had not bene saued by Christe, a whole Sauiour both of her, and of all that be and shall be saued: I did reason after this maner, that either she was a sinner, or no sinner: MarginaliaOur Lady not without sinne.if a sinner, then she was deliuered from sinne by Christ: so that he saued her, either by deliuering or by preseruing her from sinne, so that without hym neyther she, nor none other, neither be, nor could be saued. And to auoyde all offence, I shewed howe it might bee aunswered, both to certayne Scriptures which maketh all generally sinners, and how it might be aunswered vnto Chrysostome and Theophilact, which maketh her namely and specially a sinner. But all woulde not serue, theyr malice is so great: notwithstanding that fiue hundred honest men can and will beare recorde. MarginaliaPapists depraue when they cannot disproue.When they cannot reproue that thing that I do say, then they will belye mee to say that thing that they can not reprooue, for they will needes appeare to be agaynst me.

[Back to Top]
Sayntes are not to be worshipped.

So they lyed when I had shewed diuers significations of thys word (Sayntes) among the vulgare people. MarginaliaDifference betwixt images & Saintes.First Images of Sayntes are called Sayntes, and so they are not to be worshipped: take worshipping of them for praying to them: for they are neither Mediators by way of redemption, nor yet by way of intercession. And yet they may be well vsed, when they be applied to that vse that they were ordeined for, to be lay mens bookes for remēbraunce of heauenly thinges. &c.

[Back to Top]

Take Sayntes for inhabitours of heauen, and worshippinge of them, for praying to them, I neuer denyed, but that they might be worshipped, and be our Mediatours, MarginaliaMaister Latimers errour in those dayes.though not by way of redemption (for so Christ alonely is a whole Mediatour, both for them and for vs) yet by the way of intercession. &c.

[Back to Top]

Pilgrimage.

And I neuer denyed Pilgrimage. And yet I haue sayed that much scurffe must be pared away ere euer it can be wel done, MarginaliaPare away the skurfe, and cleane take all Poperye away.superstition, idolatry, false fayth, and trust in the Image, vniust estimation of the thing, setting aside Gods ordinaunce for doynge of the thing: debtes must be payd, restitutions made, wife & children prouided for, duetye to our poore neighbours discharged. And when it is at the best, before it be vowed, it neede not to be done, for it is neither vnder the bidding of GOD nor of manne to be done. And Wiues muste counsell with Husbandes, and Husbandes and Wiues with Curates, before it be vowed to bee done. &c.

[Back to Top]
Aue Maria.

MarginaliaAue Maria.As for the Aue Maria, who can thinke that I would deny it? I sayd it was an heauenly greting or saluting of our blessed Lady, wherein the Aungell Gabriell sent from the Father of heauen, did annunciate and shewe vnto her the good will of God towardes her, what he would with her and to what he had chosen her But I sayd, it was not properly a prayer, MarginaliaAue Maria no prayer.as the Pater noster, whyche our Sauior Christ himselfe made for a proper prayer, and bade vs say it for a Prayer, not adding that we shoulde say 10. or 20. Aue Maries, withall: and I denyed not but that we may well saye the Aue Maria elso, but not so that we shall thinke that the Pater noster is not good, a whole and a perfit prayer, nor can not be well sayd without Aue Maria: so that I did not speake agaynst wel saying of it, but agaynst superstitious saying of it, and of the Pater noster to: and yet I put a difference betwixte that, & that whiche Christ made to be sayd for a prayer. &c.

[Back to Top]
No fire in hell.

MarginaliaWhether the fier in hell be a materiall fier, or spirituall.Who euer could say or thinke so? Howbeit good Authors do put a difference betwixt a suffering in the fire with bodyes, and without bodyes. The soule without the body is a spirituall substaunce, which they say can not receiue a corporall quality, and some maketh it a spirituall fire: and some a corporall fire. And as it is called a fire, so is it called a Worme, and it is thought of some not to be a materiall Worme that is a liuing beast, but it is a metaphor, but that is neither to nor fro. MarginaliaThe worme of consciēce is so called by a metaphoricall speach.For a fire it is, a worme it is, a payne it is, a torment it is, an anguishe it is, a griefe, a misery, a sorow, a heauinesse inexplicable, intolerable, whose nature and condition in euery poynt who can tell, but he that is of Gods priuy counsell sayth S. Austen? 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VII, 474, fn 3

[De civitate Dei, lib. xx. 16.]

God geue vs grace rather to be diligent to keepe vs out of it, then to be curious to discusse the property of it: for certayne we be, that there is litle ease, yea none at all, but weeping, wayling, and gnashing of teeth, whiche be two effectes of extreme payne, rather certayne tokens what payne there is, then what maner payne there is.

[Back to Top]
No Purgatory.

He that sheweth the state and condition of it, doth not denye it. MarginaliaM. Latimer had leauer be in Purgatory then in Lollers Tower.But I had leauer be in it, then in Lollers tower the Bishoppes prison, for diuers skils and causes.

MarginaliaCauses declared why it is better to be in Purgatorye then in Lollers Tower.First, in this I might dye bodily for lacke of meat and drinke: in that I could not.

Item, in this I might dye ghostly for feare of payne, or lack of good counsell: there I could not.

Item, in this I might be in extreme necessity: In that I coulde not, if it be perill of perishing.

Item, in this I might lacke charity: There I could not.

Item, in this I might lose my pacience: In that I could not.

Item, in this I might be in perill and daūger of death, In that I could not.

Item, in this I might be without surety of Saluation, in that I could not.

Item, in this I might dishonor God: In that I could not.

Item, in this I might murmur & grudge agaynst God: In that I could not.

Item, in this I might displease God: In that I could not.

Item, in this I might be displeased with God: In that I coulde not.

Item, in this I might bee iudged to perpetuall prison as they call it: in that I could not.

Item, in this I might be craftily handled: In that I could not.

Item, in this I might be brought to beare a fagotte: In that I could not.

Item, in this I might be discontented with GOD: In that I could not.

Item, in this I might be separated and disseuered from Christ: In that I could not.

Item, in this I mighte bee a member of the Deuill: In that I could not.

Itē, in this I might be an inheritor of hell: In that I could not.

Item, in this I might pray out of charity, and in vayne: in that I could not.

Item,
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield